Tag Archives: Two Girls

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

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everything

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My girl will undoubtedly face ignorance as she steps further into the world. When she does, I want her armed with an impenetrable wall of self-esteem. Of belief that just as there are serious challenges in her autism, there are also gifts – her incredible memory, her uncanny ability to repeat what she’s heard or read, her pitch-perfect imitation of accents – and so much more we will have the joy of watching emerge as she grows.
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When someone spits ‘autism’ at her as a dirty word, I want her to turn it back on them, framed as her own. “Yes, I’m autistic. So? I’m damn proud of it.’” Heck, she could even throw in, ‘I’m sorry that you’re not, but that’s not my problem,” for good measure.

~ Person First, Diary, July, 2012

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Yesterday, one of my dearest friends shared a story. Well, maybe calling it a story is a bit grandiose. It was really just a moment in time. A tiny sliver of a conversation between her girls.

But well, as we all know around here, sometimes the smallest moments – the ones that may look quite ordinary to an outsider – are anything but small and anything but ordinary.

Her two girls, one thirteen and on the spectrum, one nine and not, were chatting together over breakfast. This is what they said.

Little Sister: She didn’t even know who Picasso was! And we went to the museum and everything!

Big Sister: Well…what do you expect? She’s…typical. (looks at Little, puts hand on her arm) No offense.

Five lines of conversation.

An impenetrable wall of self-esteem.

Everything.

View the original article here