Tag Archives: Toddler Boys

Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Jenny asks…

odd toddler behavior?

my 18 month old girl, does something odd – she sits on the floor and puts her hands on the floor in front of her and rocks front to back. is this abnormal behavior, she is my first girl my other kids are boys and they never did this.

admin answers:

I studied early childhood development in college and sometimes you may see this behavior early on with children that have autism. BUT, don’t get worried right away since autism comes with a lot of other symptoms and behaviors.
As long as she is developing normal on the other milestones for her age (walking, trying to talk, etc…) I wouldn’t be worried about one thing.
Some babies also develop different ways of self soothing, a tiny step into their “independence”.
Keep watching her and take her to the pediatrician if it concerns you anymore.
Happy parenting and best wishes!

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Mark asks…

experiences with Autism?

I am writing a story based on a girl with Autism
for an assignment for english.

I want to get quite close into how people relate to autistic others
So if you know anyone autistic, or are or have an autistic sibling
can you please tell me about your relationship to them
or any habits they may have etcerta etcetera
information from the net can only tell you so much,
but something personal means so much more.
Thankyou guys =D

admin answers:

My 4 y.o. Son has autism. Many days I think, Why him? Why me? But I have to always remind myself that my son’s condition is so much milder than most cases.

He looks typical, he doesn’t drool or flap hands. He speaks quite moderately, can tolerate people whistling, noises, or getting his lined cars messed. That’s why when he has a tantrum over his frustration of failing to deliver the right message, people just stare at him, labelling him as spoiled and then look at the mother who’s not doing a good job as a parent. Or when he suddenly barks at children or attempts to push them, people’s eyebrows are raising.

He’s very visual, sometimes that means a problem. I can’t go to supermarket because he thought our stuff was gone once we put it in the locker. He’s quite rigid sometimes, and we’ve had fights over how he wants to have things done his way.

I saw the symptoms at 15 months old. He ran away from other kids and covered his ears as if in pain while the kids screamed in delight. He wasn’t verbal until almost 3. We got the diagnosis at 3 years and 2 months. Before that, I’d evolved myself into guessing what he wanted, I made every decision for him and didn’t even bother to ask him anything anymore.

Many days I’d spent in tears, my spirit was broken. I hated guessing his inaudible words. I’d poured my love into this boy, and I never got a hug and a kiss from him. “He’s still a toddler, he doesn’t understand yet!” I’d told myself. Then I saw kids younger than him, rushing to their Mommies and chatted about the slides and swings.

Deep down inside, I knew something’s not right. I’d decided to do something about it. His reluctance to socialize drove me to drag him out of the house 3 times a day. We’d go to playgrounds, park, lakeside, hiking, swimming, crossing a bridge, city centre, supermarkets, shops, bus rides, ferry, every place I could think of. Within a month, I noticed a change. He’s not that scared of loud noises, crowds or buses. He’s looking forward to have these daily trips. He still hates people, but it’s a start.

As soon as we got the diagnosis, we jumped straight into the intervention. We’re doing ABA therapy for 9 months now, and it’s like cracking a shell off him and the real personality emerges. He’s charming, funny, a fast learner, eager to help people, and that cute dimpled smile always melts even the coldest heart.

He now has a playdate whom he likes. The tremendous progress he has in such a short time is nothing but miraculous. I’m in awe at how much he wants to learn and know.

My life is much easier than before ABA. His vocabulary skyrocketed and he can express his wants and needs, not specifically, but it eliminates the guessing game. In fact, he likes to play with words and came up with his own joke: “What’s so furni? The funny-ture!” and “Eleven Elephants”

I’m his mother, his therapist, his carer, his friend, his guide, his teacher. I’d do everything for him because he is my world. If there’s a magic spell that can make Autism disappear, I’d do it in a heartbeat. But, in the meantime, I’m content with what we have. My boy is healthy, my boy has Autism. And that gives him extra challenges. But we’ll overcome them. His many hugs and kisses give me strength and hope.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

William asks…

wat are the symptons of asburghes?

what should i be looking for ????

admin answers:

The symptoms of Asperger’s can depends on the age the person. There can be variation by age group and gender — toddlers, kids, boys, girls, adults, women and men. Run a Google search for “symptoms of Asperger’s in _______”. You fill in the age group and gender. Or use the link below to get more general information by age.

Http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/tc/aspergers-syndrome-symptoms

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

John asks…

Could my 2 yr old son have autism?

I have a 2 yr old boy an he doesent talk yet, well nothing pastt mama baba. He throws servere tantrems sometimes I dont even know why he is so upset. he loves to run and seems completly absessed with cars but thats really all he plays with he shows little intrest in other toys. when he watches tv its like he gets sucked into it and cant take his gaze off. Most of the time when i speak to him he aks like he cant hear me and continues what he is doing and if i interupt him he starts screamng. I have never seen any other children his age throw tantrums as often and the way he does, he will throw hisself on the floor an sometimes he hurts hisself doing this. He had a really bad fibril sezure when he was one and has had 2 very small ones since. but i am really getting concerned because of his behavior and speech problems.
Yes my son has had his hearing tested. i also read that many autistic kids have servere allergies and bowel problems. my son is allerigic to milk products. and was also diagnosed with the childhood form of irritable bowel. as far as communication, well evey morning when we get up i have to pick him up so he can look to see what he wants then he either points or grabs what he wants. he turned two on june2 i dont plan on having him tested untill he is at least 3. i dont want to jump to conclushions. but alot of friends and family have sudgested i have him checked for autism

admin answers:

Characteristics

Autism is distinguished by a pattern of symptoms rather than one single symptom. The main characteristics are impairments in social interaction, impairments in communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis.[19]

[edit] Social development

Autistic people have social impairments and often lack the intuition about others that many people take for granted. Noted autistic Temple Grandin described her inability to understand the social communication of neurotypicals as leaving her feeling “like an anthropologist on Mars”.[20]

Social impairments become apparent early in childhood and continue through adulthood. Autistic infants show less attention to social stimuli, smile and look at others less often, and respond less to their own name. Autistic toddlers have more striking social deviance; for example, they have less eye contact and anticipatory postures and are less likely to use another person’s hand or body as a tool.[18] Three- to five-year-old autistic children are less likely to exhibit social understanding, approach others spontaneously, imitate and respond to emotions, communicate nonverbally, and take turns with others. However, they do form attachments to their primary caregivers.[21] They display moderately less attachment security than usual, although this feature disappears in children with higher mental development or less severe ASD.[22] Older children and adults with ASD perform worse on tests of face and emotion recognition.[23]

Contrary to common belief, autistic children do not prefer to be alone. Making and maintaining friendships often proves to be difficult for those with autism. For them, the quality of friendships, not the number of friends, predicts how lonely they are.[24]

There are many anecdotal reports, but few systematic studies, of aggression and violence in individuals with ASD. The limited data suggest that in children with mental retardation, autism is associated with aggression, destruction of property, and tantrums. Dominick et al. Interviewed the parents of 67 children with ASD and reported that about two-thirds of the children had periods of severe tantrums and about one third had a history of aggression, with tantrums significantly more common than in children with a history of language impairment.[25]

[edit] Communication

About a third to a half of individuals with autism do not develop enough natural speech to meet their daily communication needs.[26] Differences in communication may be present from the first year of life, and may include delayed onset of babbling, unusual gestures, diminished responsiveness, and the desynchronization of vocal patterns with the caregiver. In the second and third years, autistic children have less frequent and less diverse babbling, consonants, words, and word combinations; their gestures are less often integrated with words. Autistic children are less likely to make requests or share experiences, and are more likely to simply repeat others’ words (echolalia)[17][27] or reverse pronouns.[28] Autistic children may have difficulty with imaginative play and with developing symbols into language.[17][27] They are more likely to have problems understanding pointing; for example, they may look at a pointing hand instead of the pointed-at object.[18][27]

In a pair of studies, high-functioning autistic children aged 8–15 performed equally well, and adults better than individually matched controls at basic language tasks involving vocabulary and spelling. Both autistic groups performed worse than controls at complex language tasks such as figurative language, comprehension and inference. As people are often sized up initially from their basic language skills, these studies suggest that people speaking to autistic individuals are more likely to overestimate what their audience comprehends

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Linda asks…

does my toddler sound autistic?

i have a 18 months old boy and i have never taken my son out in groups and stuff until 3 weeks ago…i havent noticed he is different until i saw other children…but i always felt he is not emotional and it bugged me a lot…anyway…i look online and i saw many autism symptoms that my son is probably showing…he doesnt respond to his name ever..he rarely smiles back to me unless i make sthg funny…he doesnt play with other children he just keeps wanding around and never settles on a toy and when children try to speak with him or give him a toy he just doesnt respond its like they aare not even there…when someone stops him to say sthg or to play with him he just goes on his way and doesnt stop..he never hugged me or kissed me..he may settle when i pick him up but never actually hugs me…he does come to me to be picked up or to nurse but i never feel he loves me for am his mother but only because am the source of his milk..he does make sounds but he doesnt speak yet and he doesnt call me at all when he says ma ma or da da he just making sounds not calling us…he only make eye contact when i sing for him but with other pple he doesnt look at them in the eye maybe for ine second but not more…he is not sociable at all but i thought maybe because he didnt use to be with anyone basically because i am egyptian and new in UK and he was born here but i have no freinds..what do u think ..i will get him checked on monday but i really want to know does all that sound normal or he is likely to be autistic..? does anyone with experience have an answer to this? thank you

i would also like to add other things i noticed…he always looks up and he focus alot on the light…he usually hold two similiar thing in each hand…he never follow directions unless when i say clap ur hands..he only loves clapping…he flaps his hands sometimes and he shakes them in a weired stiff way when he’s excited..am sorry for my language i hope am understandable…also he leans hid head to the side alot like he wants to look at things fron the side..not all the time but he does it alot…he is intrested in lots of toys however but not when we go in play groups he seems to have his own world apart from others.

admin answers:

I have three children, two with autism. Both were diagnosed very young and it is really, really important to get that early help if your child needs it. Your description of your son does raise concerns and it’s great you are going to get him evaluated. 18 months is NOT too young. I know from experience that it is terrifying to get them checked, and you are a very responsible and loving mom to go ahead and do it anyway! He is blessed to have you.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Sandy asks…

What is Autism can some one tell me?

Please explain in your own words then give me links thanks!

admin answers:

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the autism spectrum disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise autism spectrum disorder, click here.

Autism spectrum disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with autism spectrum disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Chris asks…

Does my daughter have autism symptoms?

My 15 year old daughter has sensory processing disorder and she is alittle bipolar but just a little it isnt srious but we dont want it to get to that point since mmy husband has it . She gets very stressed easily and she doesnt lke standing in lines so people don have ther shoulders touching her and she is very sensitive to dirty hands and shes always walked on her toes since she was born. she was also diagnosed wth lyme disease as a toddler and we got that taken care of. but she also put her bottom jas over her top one and pushes down then makes a moaning cry for a moment and she sayd it reales stress. and every now and then she makes those noises wthout realizing it. she also crys about anything and cant have certain textures in food and doesnt like anyone breathing on or near her . she also gets frusrtrated when trying to work even if shes doing great . she is amazing at art she paints pictures like you wouldnt believe and she sings wonderful but when someone complments her, it isnt enough then shel have a tantrum. her self asteem s extremely low and she has been bullyed and tortured since kindergarten . she is absolutley gorgeous an hour glass figure and boys can be all over her but girls call her whore slut and completley trash her facebook and shes deleted it several times but i know she has depression and the school never does anything. i just want to know if she has autism symptoms mixed wth her sensory and bipolar and maybe this s making her stress levels high and causing problems for her . she also fails school and can never sit still shes always ditching class and her grades are all under 50 so i took her put of school for awhile to pick herself up. i took her out of one state because she was tortured and moved and she is really stressed out about the moved to and im just trying to look out for her.

admin answers:

It sounds like she really needs to get a comprehensive evaluation done by a competent person. That would give you ‘both’ peace of mind and help you get to the best way to find healing .
This guy tests for all kinds of things and is seen on PBS tv at times talking about the brain and health.
Amenclinics.com he tests for hormones, vitamins, minerals, even has SPECT scans and
is a neuropsychiatrist.
It would save you money in the long run to have it all done at once .
It sounds like she has several issues and yes it could be a degree of autism, but no one can diagnose over the internet, it has to be face to face with a trained professional.
Here is a good site for healing autism , questions, etc generationrescue.org.
Here is an effective method to help heal her past abuse and childhood feelings eftmasters.com
best wishes

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Nancy asks…

what is autism some1 tell me cause its my project tell me smart person?

i need help

admin answers:

Autism speaks:
Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

Very long but it will help you with your project.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

William asks…

Would it be ethical to shrink me to a size of a 4 year old because of my Autism? Emotionally/socially I am 4.

I suffer from Autism, I am on the lower edge of high functioning Autism.
I am CHRONOLOGICALLY 32 years old, but emotionally and socially, I’m about at the level of 4 1/2 – 5 year old. My interests are like a 4 year old…I love Teletubbies, Care Bears, Barney, Sesame Street, etc. I even still have a pacifier, I have been using it for decades. I seriiously cannot help being like a 4 year old, it’s not like I purposely act like a 4 1/2 year old. If I was changed physically to a 4 year old, at least people would stop staring at me when I went to the store or supermarket and played with baby toys or candy. I’m not actually conscious they are staring at me, but my parents tell me. I feel my parents would respect me more too if I was the size of a 4 year old. Like as in some sort of proportionate dwarf, but everyone would think I was this little 4 year old kid who could speak, and leave me alone. I have many other child-related interests. I really can’t help being this way. It’s not as if I’m some sort of adult baby or something, I have no interest in infantilism, I don’t wear diapers, I’m potty trained and I certainly don’t find wetting a diaper sexual or anything like some of these strange ABs….I mean, they can control when they are being like a child, but I don’t have that ability. I’m so sick of being a child trapped into an adult’s body. A lot of people have told me that I’m like a 4 1/2 year old, and they’ve known me for 14-15 years (such as old instructors in college, close friends, relatives, etc).

Maybe the thing I want to ask really is would it be ethical to shrink me to the size of a 4 year old if a scientist was able to do so?? I read on some other question and answer on Yahoo that scientists have already shrunk smaller animals. So would it be ethical in my case?? And would you agree with my idea? I have several autistic friends and Asperger Syndrome friends who know me very well, and they say it would be ethical if something like that existed. What do you think?

I can’t hold a job because of my autism (I have a BA degree in Geography, but my autism prevents me from holding a job). I have ADHD and moderate to high functioning Autism. It is very frustrating. People have no idea of how frustrating living with autism is. I think if I looked like a 4 year old, at least I would have the physical age to match my emotional/social age. Of course, if I looked like a 4 year old boy, I would be sure to wear boutique longalls like Kelly’s Kids and Mulberry Street, and t-strap buckle shoes/English sandals (little boys look adorable wearing that stuff down South in South Carolina and Georgia). I’d be the most adorable toddler you ever saw. Of course, being 4 years old wouldn’t change that much about me, except I’d be smaller. I would still be potty trained, I would still able to speak, and to be able to listen to oldies/soft rock music. In fact, I listened to that type of music when I was really chronologically 4 years old.

What do you think?? PLEASE NO negative feedbacks. I’m being dead erious and I have a disability that is not fun. If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say it.

Preston from California

admin answers:

We all are who we are and can not change that, emotionally and socially some of us on the autism spoectrum may be a little naive in some peoples eyes.. But just like those not on the autism spectrum we also are all unique individuals.

Feeling at odds with the world and wanting to change is not the answer, society itself needs a kick up the %$#@, if only we could eliminate the ignorance of others, having to deal with prejudgment, stigma far to often no wonder some of us may feel like shrinking!

The so called “normal world” often see us as outsiders and keep us at arm’s length. Aspergers is just the way I’m wired; we are all different and have different symptoms Aspies, Auties and NT’s etc.. The world is made up of many diversities, the key is acceptance of who you are… As putting on a mask daily or acting apart to fit in can be exhausting..

“Being diagnosed for any difference, it’s not about the label
no one need know, it’s about understanding – true identity.”

Below is just a small part of my journet, read more on link, hopefully it May help you on understand that little bit more –
Making Sense – last update July 2008:
http://asplanet.info/index.php?option=co…

Having Aspergers is just part of who I am. I’ve always been different, but now there’s a name for it, I accept it. I think self-acceptance and acceptance of others are key to being accepted in general. Embracing my differences not only has allowed for a greater understanding of me, but also others in the world, it has enriched my life.

I cannot help but be fascinated about my AS, with Aspergers came the real me (true identity) and yes, I have become a little obsessed with finding, learning more. In my search I have come to the conclusion that we cannot find answers in text books and the professionals do not have all the answers, but the aspie community has welcomed me, and I have found every answer there.

I no longer feel the need to apologize for my differences, or make excuses. I also feel that NTs need to really start listening and gain better understanding from those of us on the autism spectrum ourselves… Everyone must know someone on the autism spectrum, not sure every knows or understands yet! It’s not a Aspie / NT thing, but as yet we just do not quite merge into society as maybe we should, still at times I myself feel on the edge of society in general. It can be so frustrating when whatever you seem to do or say, blank response – crossed wires…

I continue to hear:
“But I did explain to my partner, and they told me they understood” so why is it they still continue to try and fix/change me, why cannot others understand our differences, instead of wanting to force their way onto us! – AWARENESS, AWARENESS, AWARENESS until that really happens on a big scale things will never change…. Working on that and know many others are…..

I continual to be amazed by my depth of difference, the biggest problem I seem to have is the stereo typing by the “norm” in general, of how we should be. Maybe it’s our time to lead the way, as we do seem to have a natural connection, a sense with the world around us and are often happier living in a real environment rather than an artificial one. Maybe in the future we will play a much bigger part, the world is changing and I cannot help but wonder…..

My journey like everyones will never be complete, as we all continue to learn and grow… ASPLANET – http://asplanet.info/index.php

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Sandra asks…

What are some symptoms of Autism that you would find in a 2 yr. old boy?

admin answers:

Lack of eye contact would be the biggest symptom. Lack of other social interaction is also significant.

If he gets a new toy, does he show it off? If something undusual happens, (a strange person comes in the room, an appliance starts making an unusual sound, etc) does he look to the parent or caregiver for signs as to whether this is something to be concerned about?

Lack of speech is something people hear about concerning autism, but maybe as much as 50% of all kids classified with autism (high functioning) have no speech delay. Their speech may be atypical (robotic, no understanding of figures of speech, etc) but no delay. And there are many other poss reasons for speech delay, such as hearing loss. Not that speech is not an issue; just not as big of an issue for a child that young. My super brilliant nephew didn’t speak till he was nearly 3, just because he was spoiled so much he didn’t have to.

Rocking movements & such are clear signs, but toddlers rock themselves a lot anyway. It takes someone with experiance to tell the difference.

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