Tag Archives: Symptoms Of Autism

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Teenagers

Linda asks…

gluten and cassien free diet for autistic children?

I have heard that a gluten and casein free diet helps the symptoms of autism, has anyone tried it with positive results?

admin answers:

A version of gluten and casein diet is called the “whole plant based diet.” It shuns excess oils, fats, sugars, salt, and processed ingredients. The food is prepared from whole plant based ingredients rather than being commercially processed. Diet drinks contain aspartame which is deleterious to health.

Even with “healthy” children, this diet results in improvements in health and behaviors. Sadly, the AMA fights successful and inexpensive alternative treatments that do not involve drugs. This way of eating has been proven to reduce risks of vascular disease, cancer, diabetes, gout, osteoporosis, and many other diseases that relate to diet. Some dementias are related to vascular health, and this diet helps this condition. Your family will be more alert and alive by eating this way. The book “Fasting and Eating for Health” by Dr. Joel Fuhrman explains some of this. Many people claim that the mercury used as a preservative in vaccinations is to blame of autism, however, I don’t know the details. If the blood work shows heavy metals, chelation treatment may help. My wife and I suffered some heavy metal poisoning and we recovered through careful diet planning.

To learn more, check out a book from your library by one of the following authors: Dr. Neal Barnard, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., Dr. Dean Ornish, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, and Dr. John McDougall.

I personally avoid all dairy products and bread products. Avoiding genetically modified ingredients is critical. Prior to this diet, I was one meal away from heart attack. Now, I’m measurably healthier than I was when I was a teenager. My blood work is perfect.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

William asks…

What are the symptoms of autism in children under two?

admin answers:

Appears indifferent to surroundings
Appears content to be alone, happier to play alone
Displays lack of interest in toys
Displays lack of response to others
Does not point out objects of interest to others (called protodeclarative pointing)
Marked reduction or increase in activity level
Resists cuddling

Young children with autism usually have impaired language development. They often have difficulty expressing needs (i.e., use gestures instead of words) and may laugh, cry, or show distress for unknown reasons. Some autistic patients develop rudimentary language skills that do not serve as an effective form of communication. They may develop abnormal patterns of speech that lack intonation and expression and may repeat words or phrases repetitively (called echolalia). Some children with autism learn to read.

Autistic children do not express interest in other people and often prefer to be alone. They may resist changes in their routine, repeat actions (e.g., turn in circles, flap their arms) over and over, and engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., bite or scratch themselves, bang their head).

Other symptoms in young children include:
Avoids cuddling or touching
Frequent behavioral outbursts, tantrums
Inappropriate attachments to objects
Maintains little or no eye contact
Over- or undersensitivity to pain, no fear of danger
Sustained abnormal play
Uneven motor skills
Unresponsiveness to normal teaching methods and verbal clues (may appear to be deaf despite normal hearing)

Research has shown that autism occurs more often in first born children and males. My daughter (first born) was an incredibly easy, cuddly baby, but definitely displayed language/communication delays. Her diagnosis is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Betty asks…

How will Asperger syndrome and PDD be Diagnosed in the future once the definition is Changed?

I heard that instead of 3 being diagnosed with High Functioning Autism (aspergers syndrome), PDD-NOS and Autistic disorder there will only be one type
but, what if the child have mild symptoms of Autism just like Aspergers, how will they be diagnosed? How will Aspergers syndrome and PDD-NOS be diagnosed differently under the dsm-5 if they have symptoms of an autism Spectrum disorder?

admin answers:

Actually there are currently 5 subtypes…also childhood disintegrative disorder and retts

instead of labeling by subtype–they will just use one label for all groups

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,

2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.

3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and in making friends to an apparent absence of interest in people

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

C. Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

D. Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning.

Aspergers and PDDNOS CAN fit into this definition….instead of listing different types—there will just be one type…they won’t be diagnosed differently.

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Question?: Autistic Definition

Ken asks…

What is a brief description of autism?

Tomorrow I am going to an organization to help kids with autism do things that they can’t do on their own. I have never done this before, and I don’t know anyone with autism. I don’t understand how the children there will behave, or how they act. I tried looking it up, but the definitions are way to long and confusing. Please don’t be rude to people with autism when answering!

admin answers:

Autism is a neurological developmental disorder. Symptoms include difficulty socializing and communicating, lack of eye contact, delayed speech, difficulty reading people, obsessive interests, need for routine, repetitive behavior, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing.

The symptoms of autism range from severe to mild. There is a lot of diversity among people with autism. There’s not just one way an autistic person will behave or act; they are all different. The children you’ll work with may become agitated by sudden changes. Some won’t be receptive to you at first, since you’re new. They may have repetitive behaviors like hand-flapping or rocking back and forth. They might go on monologues about topics of interests, or they might talk very little. Some will react negatively or even have a meltdown over certain sounds, foods, or touch. But like I said, all autistic people are different, so don’t expect every child there to act the same.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Treatment

Carol asks…

Pervasive Developmental Disorder…?

What is it??? What are the causes? What does it do? How to get rid of it if you can……

THANKS !
PLEASE ANSWERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

admin answers:

Pervasive developmental disorders cause abnormal development, including social and communication development. The symptoms appear early on – by the age of 3 at least, except in one of the disorders – and last throughout the lifetime. There are five of them: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Autism, Asperger’s, and PDD-NOS are called the autism spectrum.

Symptoms of autism include difficulty socializing and communicating with others, delayed speech, lack of eye contact, difficulty interpreting nonverbal signals, intense fixations and interests, repetitive or compulsive movements, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing. The severity of these symptoms varies considerably. Asperger’s syndrome is a mild and high-functioning form of autism. The symptoms are the same except there is no speech delay. PDD-NOS is when someone has some autistic traits and significant impairment, but does not meet the diagnostic criteria for another PDD. These disorders have a genetic basis, but researchers have not yet uncovered the specifics. Some people believe environmental factors also play a role.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is when a child appears to be developing normally, then suddenly regresses sometime after the age of 3. The cause of this disorder is unknown. Rett syndrome occurrs almost exclusively in females. Infants with this disorder experience regression between 6-18 months of age. Symptoms include lack of speech, seizures, sensory problems, poor motor coordination, growth abnormalities, and repetitive movements. It is caused by a gene mutation on the X chromosome.

None of the PDDs are curable. There are many treatments available, including occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy, and certain medications.

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Laura asks…

How will Asperger syndrome and PDD be Diagnosed in the future once the definition is Changed?

I heard that instead of 3 being diagnosed with High Functioning Autism (aspergers syndrome), PDD-NOS and Autistic disorder there will only be one type
but, what if the child have mild symptoms of Autism just like Aspergers, how will they be diagnosed? How will Aspergers syndrome and PDD-NOS be diagnosed differently under the dsm-5 if they have symptoms of an autism Spectrum disorder?

admin answers:

The proposal would have 3 levels of Autism Spectrum Disorder. The mildest level would probably include many people with PDD-NOS and Aspergers Syndrome. The moderate level and more severe level would probably be more classic autism. The different levels would refer to the amount of support needed at school, at home, or in the community.

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Question?: Pdd

Jenny asks…

Does PDD-NOS gradually disappear as they get older?

I’ve heard from several sources that unlike other branches of autism like Aspergers, PDD-NOS can be outgrown or disappears in adult life. Can I get some input from some mental health professionals with experience with people with it? My 4 year old daughter was just diagnosed with it and she loves trains and spends most if not all of her alone time jumping and flapping her arms in a corner and talking to herself under her breath. I love her to bits. I’m just wondering if it will stay with her as she grows up. Any help will be strongly appreciated.

admin answers:

My 2.5 year old also has PDD-NOS and I was told the same thing by a pediatrician. I honestly don’t think they totally outgrow it but that because it is less severe than classic autism its possible for them to overcome a lot of the symptoms which would cause them to loose the PDD-NOS label. I do think that some things will still stay with them when they grow up but it will likely be so mild that it will be unnoticeable by anyone who doesn’t know she had been diagnosed as PDD-NOS.
Many parents are recovering their children by reversing the symptoms of autism so I do think that it could be possible to completely overcome PDD-NOS using biomedical treatment. If you want some more info on it here are some good websites
http://www.autism.com/index.asp
http://www.generationrescue.org/
http://danasview.net/
and here are some good groups where you can talk to other parents who are recovering their children
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/abmd/?yguid=243434626
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/GFCFKids/?yguid=243434626

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In 3 Year Old

Betty asks…

How do i know if my 2 year old has autism?

I am curious because since he turned 2 his speech development has slowed down tremendously, he pretty much knows mommy, dada, ball, and bye, and will continually repeat them. I have been doing some of my own research but it is hard for me to really know because of the fact that i am his mother. He has a younger brother who turned 1 in August and at first his doctor said that it was because of his brother that he wasnt talking, but the 1 year old says more than my 2 year old, i just dont understand. If anybody can help me it would be greatly appreciated!

admin answers:

School districts do not assess children under the age of 3 years old so that is not an option yet. I also would not rely to heavily on a peditrician as very few are aware of the early signs and symptoms of autism and will say things like it will come with time or he is just a boy so he is a late talker etc. Besides language what are your other concerns. Does he use the limited language he has functionally? When he syas ball is it becaue he sees a ball or wants a ball? A child can have a simple language delay that is easy to fix and is usually totally fixable. Signs of autism include not playing with toys appropriately, not using gestures, facial expressions to communicate, not showing shared enjoyement or joint attention. When your child is playing with his favorite toy does he look at you to see if you are watching? If something funny, silly or scary happens does he look at your face to see your reaction? IF you play peek a boo or some similar game does he try to get you to do it again or do more of something fun. Also you can look for stereotypic behavior, hand flapping rocking, spinning objects over and over again, watching just the wheels on the car or truck instead of the whole toy?
These kind of social pragmatic indicators are more important for discerning autism compared to perhaps a simple speech delay. IT is not too early to investigate speech services. A speech person who specializes in working with young children does speech all with toys on the floor and play based so the kids don’t know they are in therapy and they give you wonderful ideas about how to bring out language in your child in daily activities and routines in order to further develop speech. Seek out other professionals. A developmental pediatrician or psychologist might be able to do a formal assessment. NOw adays many area have autism clinics at the children’s hospital or through MR/DD service providers taht serve children with disabilties birth through death. Where I live it is called the regional center but there are similar providers with different names depending where you live. Good luck.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Mandy asks…

Looking for simple explanation of PDD-NOS (Pervasive De – and things that have worked to improved the diagnose

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

admin answers:

PDD-NOS is a condition on the autism spectrum. Autism is generally defined as a disorder involving language delay, difficulties with social reciprocity and social skills, and repetitive behavior. PDD-NOS is a condition where there are signs and symptoms of autism, but not enough to make a full diagnosis. For instance, perhaps the person shows language delay and difficulty with social skills, but not repetitive behavior in the classically autistic sense. That kind of thing.
Interventions for PDD-NOS are similar to those used for autism: speech therapy, occupational therapy, behavior intervention, social skills intervention, etc. However, individuals on the autism spectrum are NOT the same – there is a huge variance in how people act and behave, even though they might have similar diagnoses. As a result, the type of interventions that might work best for one person might be different for someone else.

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Question?: Autism Signs In 15 Month Old

Donna asks…

Is speech impairment an essential symptom/sign of autism?

Most autistic children do not speak normally.What are the other symptoms of autism?

admin answers:

Yes. Autism is typically recognized between 15 – 24 months old. Though it may not be diagnosed until much later. In those 9 months a child with Autism will begin displaying signs that may indicate and delay or regression. The earliest signs can come in the first year. A child that isn’t smiling when they are suppose to and tip-toe walking are common early signs. The first major signs are a delay in communication or a regression in communication. Parents of children with Autism usually describe either A. Their child didn’t start talking “on time” ( same time as peers) or that they stopped saying words they usually said before.(regressed) . The delay in communication is usually paired with a sense of confusion or disconnect the child may have with peers or siblings. Example not responding when name is called, not making eye contact, unable to follow simple instructions, parallel playing with peers, not engaging in conversations with peers. Because of the lack of speech and communication the child may become frustrated and display tantrum behavior. Tantrums usually take the place of words early on in children with Autism. Behavior can also be due to the fact that the child is very particular with how they expect things to be or happen. They can have rigid routines and not like transitioning. These are also sensory issues that most children with Autism have. Other sensory issues include sensitivity to loud sounds, touch and textures. There are many other signs but these are the typical first major indicators. There are several levels of Autism the earlier Autism is recognized and therapy begins the better the outcome.

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