Tag Archives: Support Group

Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Mary asks…

Does anybody know any friendship groups for adults with Asperger’s Syndrome?

Okay so somebody told me that there is a support group or whatever for people with Asperger‘s Syndrome. Do you know of a such thing?

admin answers:

There are good forums for people with Asperger’s syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders at http://www.wrongplanet.net

There you can talk to other adults who have it. I have found those forums very useful.

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Question?: Adhd Medications

Susan asks…

Is there a better adhd medication than vyvance?

I know a lot about adhd medication and have taken many different medications trying to find the right one to ease my adhd a little with out having an overwhelming amount of side effects. I am currently taking vyvance and it works great for school work, tests and quizzes but outside of school i dred being on the medication. Is there any adhd medication that works as well as vyvance in aspects of school work?

admin answers:

I have major depression and anxiety and I attend a weekly support group for people with depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, etc. One of the first things I learned is that a medication that works wonders for one person might not be helpful at all for someone else.

The brain is the most complex organ in the body, and it is still trial and error for doctors to figure out what medications work the best for an individual. I have lost count of all the psych meds and combinations of meds I have tried for my problems.

People on YA can make guesses on which meds might work best for you. However, the sad truth is that you will probably have to experiment with different meds to find out what works the best. This can be be VERY frustrating. I know this from my own experience.

Below is a list of the most common ADHD meds. Maybe something in the list will give you some idea. Otherwise, you can try googling “ADHD medications” or “ADHD medication lists” and do some research. It would be nice if the doctors did all the research and knew all the answers, but unfortunately it doesn’t work that way, at least not at this time.

Http://adhd.emedtv.com/adhd/adhd-medications-p2.html

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Steven asks…

Where can an adult get social skills training?

My brother is 25 and he needs social skills training. He has Aspergers Syndrome, meaning he does not interact as he should. He often does not initiate conversations and instead sits quietly. He does not make eye contact.

He graduated from college with a BA in Biology. Other than socializing he is intelligent. The question I have is, what can be done or where can he go to get proper social skills training? He is already an adult, and it is hard to find social skills training programs for adults. We live in Western Massachusetts, near Springfield,so something local would be better, but any information will help.

Thanks.

admin answers:

Unfortunately, there are a lot of options for younger people, but very little support for adults over age 22 with AS. This is an area of HUGE need. I have AS. My wife and I plan to start an AS support group for adults very soon.

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How Autism Support Groups Can Help

Autism support groups are excellent for people learning how to come to terms with the condition and their families who are often struggling to know how to cope. There are several different styles of support group available, and you will need to decide, which one will suit your needs. Depending on whether you need the support yourself or for family members will often determine the style of the group needed.

There are many different areas covered in the support groups, and you have to decide if you want a group that focuses on one area, or a wide spectrum of issues. You have to appreciate that the symptoms for Autism vary a huge amount, therefore, some of what you are involved with will not be beneficial to you. However, you and your family may still be interested in participating within these groups.

Parents who have children that are autistic may be finding it hard to cope, and come to terms with the full time care that their children need. Finding support groups that can allow these parents to talk through their problems, and realize that they are not alone is incredibly beneficial. There are thousands of people learning to cope with their autistic children, and benefiting from support groups all over the world.

You may find that all of the information that you are provided with when you are diagnosed is too much to understand. Therefore, the support groups can go back over the information, and ensure that you fully understand what lies ahead for you and your family. Many parents feel frustrated by their children’s behavior, and this can cause issues within the family unit. Sometimes it is far easier to talk to other people and support groups allow you to do this.

There are a large number of different support groups that will allow you to discuss and express how you feel. You need to understand that the emotions and feelings that you have are perfectly normal and many other parents have felt them before. Talking to people who have been living with autism within the family for some time can provide you with the knowledge that you will bebale to cope.

Some support groups for autism may be run by parents and care providers of autistic children; however, there are other groups, which are run by professionals. The professionals are excellent, and can give you the scientific knowledge and answers that you may need. However, groups run by people who have to deal with autism every day may have a far wider knowledge. You will be amazed at the level of strength and commitment that these people display.

Once you have found a support group that you feel you want to be part of, you need to establish where and when the meetings will be held. Some groups will charge a small fee for their services to cover the rent of the space they are using. Other groups may be free to attended, and these will often be extremely full. Whatever group you decide to join, you will be gaining knowledge that will help you all to lead normal lives.

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School To Work – How To Ensure Smooth Transition For Autistic Children

Whether the autistic child has just graduated from high school or passed out from college, learning practical and proven ways to deal with life outside a secure and disciplined environment that is mainly academic, is very essential to helping them adjust to the demands of a competitive environment, such as a work culture demands.

Many autistic children are financially dependent to a certain extent, if not fully reliant, on sustenance from their parents, much like regular kids are, but the situation is more complicated for autistic children as opposed to normal kids who are better able to fend for themselves since they do have have the mental and physical limitations of autism disorder preventing them from adjusting to a new life and coping with work demands -even when both sets of kids may be initially scared of the change.

Their time to live among peer groups in a controlled environment is over and instead of facing known situations every day as in a school routine, autistic children venturing into the professional world have to deal with new, hitherto unknown sets of living situations while applying themselves to a career, which can be intimidating for them, without help from a support group or parental guidance.

Learning ways to deal with people in a business environment and distinct differences existing in behavioral modes in school and work culture is very important for autistic children as proper grooming, hygiene and knowledge of work-place behavior constitute their elements for succeeding in a difficult, complex and rapidly advancing work culture. These are children that have needed assistance in brushing teeth and combing their hair or other such regular things normal children dismiss as being routine, but which are hard work for autistic children and thus, caregivers need to be sensitive and make autistic children aware of these expectations their work-place will have from them besides teaching them appropriate behavior in the work environment.

Autistic children who have had proper schooling are usually at a learning level of being able to control outbursts of the emotional kind they may have been prone to in earlier stages and are capable of following instructions and doing highly skilled tasks, besides some showing a marked distinction at music or math.

The main area of negotiation that autistic children need to be guided about is dealing with relationship problems as they are simple by nature and presume others to be good, like them, which unfortunately, is not always true of all people in this changing world; thus, they get taken advantage of and suffer due to the dubious ethics of others. So, it is important for caregivers of autistic children leaving a school environment for a work one to inculcate in them realistic, worldly teachings and make them survivors in a competitive work place for their own good besides having a potential employer clue in other workers about the child’s condition so as to enable a healthy work-place relationship among colleagues who may need to be educated about what comes with the disorder and how to treat an autistic individual right.

Preparing the autisitc child about ignorance and intolerance that may come his or her way at the workplace due to personal factors or even lack of awareness about thier condition is very necessary to prevent disappointment and emotional issues later. Going in for counselling, speaking to other supportive family members or seeking advice from a caring guide can help boost an autistic child’s confidence in approaching work life after school life and make the change a happy and healthy one.

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Reducing Sibling Rivalry In An Autistic House

When a family member is diagnosed with autism, there is a vast amount of information teaching parents how to cope with an autistic child, and there is also information for parents about dealing with an autistic child’s different behaviors. However, there are fewer learning tools for those who have an autistic sibling, even though this is a very stressful situation for brothers and sisters of an autistic child. The following tips can help children cope with an autistic sibling.

Sometimes parents are so involved in preparing themselves and their autistic child for the transition ahead that they forget that their other children must also deal with the new situation. Often, siblings of an autistic child may feel the new situation acutely. They may feel neglected by parents or jealous of the autistic child who is now receiving more attention. Also, they may find their peers constantly teasing them about having an autistic sibling, which can lead to more stress. This may lead to behavioral issues, with the sibling acting out and becoming a “problem child” to receive attention. In some cases, the sibling may even try to hurt the autistic brother or sister in an attempt to remove him from the family environment.

However, this is not always the case. Sometimes, having an autistic sibling forces one to “grow up” and become responsible. There can be a strong emotional attachment to the autistic sibling and a keen desire to keep him or her safe in all situations. Furthermore, living with an autistic sibling can teach one to be more open about another person’s differences. In this way, having an autistic sibling is a life-enriching experience that pushes individuals to be emotionally and mentally stronger and to be more tolerant towards others in life

One tip for siblings to cope with their autistic brother or sister is to find a support group. There should be resources available at the local chapter of the Autism Society of America. This is especially important in helping siblings feel that they are not alone and isolated in this unfolding situation-others are dealing with the same sorts of problems. Also, try to increase family interaction. Schedule a regular family day or family night each week, where all children can spend time with parents or other family members and share their day or week experiences and any problems. The best thing to remember is to be open about how you are feeling.

If children feel that their parents are neglecting some aspect of their life, simply asking them for a moment of their time is often the best solution. It is important for parents to be understanding towards their children’s needs for attention, whether they are autistic or not. Communication is the key to helping the entire family run smoothly.

We’re a resource site for those looking for autism advice or need autism tips. Visit us or check out our autism articles.
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The Ways Brothers and Sisters Can Cope With Autistic Family Members

When a family member is diagnosed with autism, there is a vast amount of information teaching parents how to cope with an autistic child, and there is also information for parents about dealing with an autistic child’s different behaviors. However, there are fewer learning tools for those who have an autistic sibling, even though this is a very stressful situation for brothers and sisters of an autistic child. The following tips can help children cope with an autistic sibling.

Sometimes parents are so involved in preparing themselves and their autistic child for the transition ahead that they forget that their other children must also deal with the new situation. Often, siblings of an autistic child may feel the new situation acutely. They may feel neglected by parents or jealous of the autistic child who is now receiving more attention. Also, they may find their peers constantly teasing them about having an autistic sibling, which can lead to more stress. This may lead to behavioral issues, with the sibling acting out and becoming a “problem child” to receive attention. In some cases, the sibling may even try to hurt the autistic brother or sister in an attempt to remove him from the family environment.

However, this is not always the case. Sometimes, having an autistic sibling forces one to “grow up” and become responsible. There can be a strong emotional attachment to the autistic sibling and a keen desire to keep him or her safe in all situations. Furthermore, living with an autistic sibling can teach one to be more open about another person’s differences. In this way, having an autistic sibling is a life-enriching experience that pushes individuals to be emotionally and mentally stronger and to be more tolerant towards others in life

One tip for siblings to cope with their autistic brother or sister is to find a support group. There should be resources available at the local chapter of the Autism Society of America. This is especially important in helping siblings feel that they are not alone and isolated in this unfolding situation-others are dealing with the same sorts of problems. Also, try to increase family interaction. Schedule a regular family day or family night each week, where all children can spend time with parents or other family members and share their day or week experiences and any problems. The best thing to remember is to be open about how you are feeling. If children feel that their parents are neglecting some aspect of their life, simply asking them for a moment of their time is often the best solution. It is important for parents to be understanding towards their children’s needs for attention, whether they are autistic or not. Communication is the key to helping the entire family run smoothly.

Information on autism symptoms can be found at the Autism Diagnosis site.
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