Tag Archives: Spoken Language

Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Sandy asks…

rett syndrome-please help!?

Hi all> I asked this question before but didnt get any responses

Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I never had it but wanted to help. This is what my research came up with,
Stage I, called early onset, generally begins between 6 and 18 months of age. Quite frequently, this stage is overlooked because symptoms of the disorder may be somewhat vague, and parents and doctors may not notice the subtle slowing of development at first. The infant may begin to show less eye contact and have reduced interest in toys. There may be delays in gross motor skills such as sitting or crawling. Hand-wringing and decreasing head growth may occur, but not enough to draw attention. This stage usually lasts for a few months but can persist for more than a year.

Stage II, or the rapid destructive stage, usually begins between ages 1 and 4 and may last for weeks or months. This stage may have either a rapid or a gradual onset as purposeful hand skills and spoken language are lost. The characteristic hand movements begin to emerge during this stage and often include wringing, washing, clapping, or tapping, as well as repeatedly moving the hands to the mouth. Hands are sometimes clasped behind the back or held at the sides, with random touching, grasping, and releasing. The movements persist while the child is awake but disappear during sleep. Breathing irregularities such as episodes of apnea and hyperventilation may occur, although breathing is usually normal during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss of social interaction and communication. General irritability and sleep irregularities may be seen. Gait patterns are unsteady and initiating motor movements can be difficult. Slowing of head growth is usually noticed during this stage.

Stage III, also called the plateau or pseudo-stationary stage, usually begins between ages 2 and 10 and can last for years. Apraxia, motor problems, and seizures are prominent during this stage. However, there may be improvement in behavior, with less irritability, crying, and autistic-like features. An individual in stage III may show more interest in her surroundings, and her alertness, attention span, and communication skills may improve. Many girls remain in this stage for most of their lives.

The last stage, stage IV — called the late motor deterioration stage — can last for years or decades and is characterized by reduced mobility. Muscle weakness, rigidity (stiffness), spasticity, dystonia (increased muscle tone with abnormal posturing of extremity or trunk), and scoliosis (curvature of the spine) are other prominent features. Girls who were previously able to walk may stop walking. Generally, there is no decline in cognition, communication, or hand skills in stage IV. Repetitive hand movements may decrease, and eye gaze usually improves.

Hope it helps.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Older Children

Michael asks…

How do you determine a learning disability?

Is it based on IQ and if so how is this tested if a child is non verbal. We are getting our official diagnosis of our son next week and know it will be severe autism and learning disability. We can choose to accept or not the diagnosis, I agree with the autism one but how can a learning disability diagnosis be secure in a 3.5 yr old if he doen’t speak.

admin answers:

Learning disabilities are generally broken down into four major categories including spoken language, written language, arithmetic, and reasoning. Because one cannot ‘see’ a learning disability, it is often called the ‘hidden disability.’ This makes assessment somewhat more difficult to determine and often leaves many individuals with learning disabilities to suffer in silence and isolation.

Learning disabilities typically originate in childhood and if identified early, parents and teachers can use various interventions to help the child cope with his or her disability. Some important signals that parents can look for that may be a sign of a learning disability include: difficulty understanding and/or following directions; poor memory; failure to master major milestones in scholastic development on time (i.e. Reading, math, writing) usually resulting in poor performance in school, problems with reversing letters and/or numbers, lack of hand-eye-movement coordination, and other behaviours that seem out of the ordinary when considering the child’s age and developmental stage.
It will be hard for you to consider the following but it is very important: forget about stigma; later you will need to claim DLA and Mobility; a diagnosis of Autism on its own won’t guarantee this but a double diagnosis will make it easier.
You will know your own child and any medical diagnosis will not change that but it may make life easier in the future.

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Question?: Autistic Savant

Helen asks…

What classifies someone as an autistic savant?

Is it its own syndrome in the DSM-IV-TR?

I understand to be a savant you have to have a great ability in a specific area, but is there…a list or something? Of criterion:?

admin answers:

An autistic savant is a person with both autism and savant syndrome. Savant syndrome is usually recognized during childhood and is found in children with autism and other developmental difficulties. However, it can also be acquired in an accident or illness, typically one that injures or impairs the left side of the brain.

Most autistic savants have very extensive mental abilities, called splinter skills.
– They can recall facts, numbers, license plates, maps, and extensive lists of sports and weather statistics after only being exposed to them once.
– Some savants can mentally note and then recall perfectly a very long sequence of music, numbers, or speech
– Some, dubbed mental calculators, can do exceptionally fast arithmetic, including prime factorization
– Other skills include precisely estimating distances and angles by sight, calculating the day of the week for any given date over the span of tens of thousands of years, and being able to accurately gauge the passing of time without a clock

Most autistic savants have a single special skill, while others have multiple skills. Usually these skills are concrete, non-symbolic, right hemisphere skills, rather than left hemisphere skills, which tend to be more sequential, logical, and symbolic

Savantism is not described in the DSM, but some Autistic disorder criteria mentioned include:
– impairment in social interaction (no eye contact, lack of pointing out objects of interest, failure to develope peer relations, etc.)
– impairment in communication (delay or lack of spoken language, inability to sustain conversation, repetitive language, lack of varied or make-believe play, etc.)
– restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior (strict adherence to rituals and schedules, preoccupation with one or more pattern of interest, repetitive movements, preoccupation with parts of objects, etc.)

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Question?: What Is Autism

Carol asks…

What is the difference between aspergers and high functioning autism?

I have high-functioning autism and i am in top set of year 8. However i also have a passion for maths, does this mean i have aspergers. sorry i have a very basic understanding.

admin answers:

Both Aspergers and Autistic Disorder are both Autism Spectrum Disorders. The difference between the two however is when spoken language developed. If it developed significantly later than it should have (e.g. No first word by 15-18 months, no two-word combinations by 24 months), then the diagnosis would be Autistic Disorder. If langauge developed normally, it would be Aspergers.

Even those who are diagnosed with Autistic Disorder can go on to develop language just a few years later. My daughter’s development lagged behind by a year or so, but others have been non-verbal until much later (e.g. Temple Grandin has Autistic Disorder and was non-verbal until 4 years old, I know someone who was non-verbal to 7 years old) but as they get older catch up and have normal language.

High functioning means how well they function in the world – there are those who have a classic autism diagnosis who can function as well as an asperger’s person and can look after themselves fairly well, and are considered “high functioning”. Someone who is non verbal or strugles to with daily living severely (and could never live on their own) is considered low functioning.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Linda asks…

What are signs that a child has Autism?

admin answers:

I tend to worry about checklists, because they’re often taken out of context…ie “My child flaps his hands when he’s really excited, could it be autism?” Lots of kids, and adults flap when excited. Ever watch Wheel of Fortune?

A really good website if you’re concerned is First Signs http://www.firstsigns.org/index.html

EDITED TO ADD: Another good website, with examples of what the diagnostic criteria means.. This website is great for those that don’t know much about autism. Http://www.bbbautism.com/diagnostics_psychobabble.htm

To be diagnosed with autism, a child should have a total of six (or more) items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1), and one each from (2) and (3):

(1) qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
(a) marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors, such as eye-to- eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
(b) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
(c) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
(d) lack of social or emotional reciprocity

(2) qualitative impairments in communication, as manifested by at least one of the following:
(a) delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
(b) in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
(c) stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
(d) lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level

(3) restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities as manifested by at least one of the following:
(a) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
(b) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
(c) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting or complex whole-body movements)
(d) persistent precoccupation with parts of objects

AND:
B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years: (1) social interaction, (2) language as used in social communication, or (3) symbolic or imaginative play.

In a child age 16-30 months, the MCHAT is an excellent screening tool to see if you should evaluate for autism. Http://messageboards.ivillage.com/n/mb/message.asp?webtag=iv-ppautism&msg=20700.1&ctx=0

Edited to add: I have an issue with autism being diagnosed where the criteria is being disregarded. Are you using autism and pdd-nos interchangeably? If so, then I can see how it could happen. Beetlemilk, because your son’s don’t meet the criteria for autism, they’ve been diagnosed with pdd-nos. PDD-NOS is a diagnosis by exclusion. If a child presents with some symptoms from (1), (2), and/or (3), and their pattern of symptoms is not better described by one of the other PDD diagnoses (i.e., Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Rett’s Disorder, or Childhood Disintegrative disorder) then a professional might decide that a diagnoses of PDD-NOS is warranted.

When comparing PDD-NOS to Autism, PDD-NOS is used when a child has symptoms of autism, but not in the configuration needed for an autism diagnosis. Social component is where the most impairment is seen. Children who fail to meet criteria for autism and don’t have adequate social impairment typically have a developmental disability, and their symptoms can by accounted for by that.

Regarding the childbrain quiz, my daughter now scores around 118, and that was using the grading guide before answering each question. Without using that guide, I did score it closer to 132. Still in the moderate range, and it’s an accurate reflection. When she was younger, she did score higher. I’ve seen that to be a very good screening tool as well. One caution though, children with speech delays could fall under “mild pdd” when it’s not present. That’s why it’s important to follow up with a reputable diagnostician.

Within the autism diagnostic criteria, My daughter has the following profile From section 1 A is fairly mild, B severe, C is fairly resolved, D is mild
From section 2 A mild since language is comming in, B Severe, C moderate, D moderate
From section 3 A & B moderate…working very hard to resolve these, but her obsessive tendancies are pretty tough to crack. C & D are not issues at all, nor have they ever been issues.

Within the criteria for an autism diagnosis, her spectrum is mild to severe, depending on symptom. She’s also very high functioning (which relates more to self help skills, and IQ) I would say honestly she’s mild/moderate autistic

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Symptoms of High-Functioning Autism

My first recollection of autism is connected to watching the ‘Rainman’ movie and thinking about what happened to that brilliant child on the screen. On one hand, so talented on the other so restricted. My next close encounter with the disorder took place when my daughter became a teacher for disabled kids ages seven through ten. I still remember that night when she came back home from school, I looked at her face and knew something tragic must have happen. She shared with me her experience with one of her students diagnosed with autism. Now she brings home the knowledge and awareness that I would not have otherwise. As with all critical occurrences, there is no one single description of the disorder or the cure of it.

Autism is in fact the core condition of a spectrum of disorders, which all share common characteristics and are demonstrated in very diverse ways within each individual.

Autism is a major disability, affecting communication and interaction with other people, but also with the world.

The degree of autism varies from severe to mild, but the consequence is always serious. Accordingly, someone with autism may have severe autism with severe additional learning difficulties, while others may have mild degrees of autism with normal or high levels of intelligence. The majority of those affected by autism have learning disabilities. Their language development varies greatly. Some may have very good speech, although lacking full comprehension, while a significant portion of those with autism will have no spoken language. Many may be hypersensitive to noise, light, touch or smell, and under-react to pain.

The particular causes of autism are not known; we do know however that it is a biologically based disorder affecting the brain development. The patterns of disorderly behavior do not emerge until the child is between 18 months and 3 years old. At times there is a period of seemingly normal development and then, between 18 months and 3 years, the child gives the impression to withdraw and lose skills. We do know that parents are not to blame for autism, but, actually, are the child’s greatest resource.

As for the common signs of autism – those are social, communication and behavior. Autism is displayed in social settings, verbal communication, nonverbal communication, development of imagination and resistance to change of a routine.

Here are examples of such behaviors. Affected kid shows indifference; he or she joins activities with others only if adult insists and assists. The interactions in social settings are one sided. He or she indicates need by using an adult’s hand, does not play with other children, talks consistently only about one topic, displays bizarre behavior. Very common is echolalia, when the child copies words. Laughing or giggling comes up in the most inappropriate times. There is no eye contact, variety is not spice of life, and there is lack of creative (pretend) play.

Some of the affected kids can do some things very well and very quickly, but those never involve social interaction. Early diagnosis of such condition is crucial in order to minimize the problems and maximize the full potential of the person.

I cannot tell if the explosion of autism since 1980 has been triggered by our ability to diagnose or by the actual changes in the fetus and baby development caused by the overdose of chemicals. I know though, that we managed to register 77,000 artificial food additives since 1940 and that an average American consumes 14 pounds of chemicals with their food per year. The results of these statistics cannot be ignored by our bodies. Simple reality check: if you would not put something into your fish tank, don’t stick it in your body.

Maybe it will not happen to eliminate autism, but it will definitely help our health and the world.

In the mean time I would like to invite you to gain more information about the early detection of the disorder and ways to gain control of the situation.

Be am amazed with the value of experience that comes from a simple heart to heart conversation. Yes, when the words are missing, hearts talk. Breathe in the magnificence of life and breathe out the passion for love so others can be poisoned with it. http://lifelonghomebiz.com/

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Improving The Possibilities Of Curing Autism

Our medical science is not yet ready to wipe autism clean from our world. The real cause of autism remains unknown. Regretfully, our medical advancement has not shown any progress in bringing forth a cure for this severe disease. Autism is still affecting children all around the world and the most unfortunate thing is that, their parents have no clue of what they must do. Reason for this dilemma is the lack of awareness. The number of autism-affected children this year has increased a bit higher than the previous years.

Before starting a therapy process to cure autism, a child must go through a precise process of diagnosis, to determine the existence of the disease. If they are found to be affected by the disease, then they must be enrolled in the autism therapy. Doctors found out that, genetic disorder is one of the reasons of getting a neurological disease. Therefore, experts are trying to cure autism and other neurological diseases by starting treatment at the cellular level. However, not just medicines, autism patients suffer from psychological disorder; so, they need a series of therapy to get their social understanding skill improved. Experts and doctors suggest following a set of rules systematically to improve the possibilities of curing autism.

A medical checkup is important
According to world-renowned researchers and doctors of autism, a complete medical treatment is needed before starting any therapy to cure a neurological disease. There is no general treatment for autism patients, as each patient display different forms of symptoms in this disease. Fortunately, there is a pattern of treatment followed by doctors to cure autism.

Therapy comes next
Modern therapy for autism consists of medicine and exercises to improve the learning abilities of patients. A common problem seen in autism patients is their difficulty in understanding the spoken language. They also have problems to respond accordingly.

Therefore, they must be enrolled in to speech therapy at first. The Sensory Integration Therapy that improves the patient’s brain growth would follow this up with the increased flow of sensory information process.

Selecting school
An autism affected patient needs to be exposed in social environment. School helps them mingle with other students and understand emotions as well as develops their reasoning ability. However, they also need attention and care, more than students who are without the disease. So, find a school that is capable of providing all that the patient needs.

These are the rules that can develop a patient of autism and improve their learning skills naturally. So, keep yourself updated about news on how to cure autism and spread the knowledge among others too.

Annie Barrete is a well-known autism researcher and publisher. Her long search for a helpful Aid for Autism led her to be an expert in treating autism patients. She believes sharing knowledge can help people who are in distress.

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Autism Sign Language – Using Sign Language With an Autistic Child

Autism Sign Language

In recent times a expanding interest has been make it out to teaching sign blabber to autistic children who own failed to develop speech. Sign language is a gobbledygook which relies on movements of hands, arms or body and facial expressions in order to communicate. Autism Sign Language

This is commonly exhausted by deaf people or hard of hearing people. But it is also becoming popularly exhausted by other sectors, especially hearing non verbal children who suffer from diminished syndrome, trauma, autism, cerebral palsy, brain disorders and speech disorders.

More and more parents now rely on sign language as a mode of quick communication particularly among their children who have with very brief thought spans or limited language capabilities. Autism is a brain development disorder which results in damage to social skills, language and behavior. This disorder causes restricted and repetitive behavior which can be identified during infancy or childhood years. Autism affects many parts of the brain and parents are able to notice signs in the first few years of their child’s life.

One of the main questions arising with regard to an autistic child would be whether he/she is ever able to develop speech. According to recent research it is conveyed that with appropriate interventions there is a possibility that children with autism can learn to talk. There are several ways to help autistic children to talk. And the most popular way is to teach speech through the utilization of sign language. Autism Sign Language

Researchers suggest that the use of sign language increases the chances of autistic children learning the spoken language. In addition it also provides children with an alternative mode of communication. It is easy for parents or caregivers to learn sign language and utilize it while interacting with an autistic child. Also it is found that autistic children are able to learn signing successfully.

Some reasons for this are that signs can be physically guided unlike speech, signs can be frozen in time in order for the child to process it, sign language is more iconic than speech, individual signs can be easily grasped and it is believed that signing is processed in the right hemisphere of the brain. Since research has shown there may be differential disturbance of left hemisphere brain functions in autistic children this might be another reason why signing is easier for them to learn.

Teaching sign language to the child would provide him/her with a way of expressing his/her needs in a manner which is more socially accepted and easily understood. Due to this the child would experience less frustration. Also an increase in social awareness and decrease in tantrums due to frustration will follow with the ability to communicate. Autism Sign Language

Another more crucial advantage in teaching sign language is that it would lessen some of the learning problems that autistic children face. It is believed that through acquiring sign language early on, the child is able to build up cognitive structures which are the basis for later learning. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Sign Language program now!

Autism Sign Language is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Autistic Language – Using Sign Language With an Autistic Child

Autistic Language

In most recent times a growing interest has been directed to teaching sign jargon to autistic children who undergo failed to boost speech. Sign language is a gobbledygook that relies on movements of hands, arms or body and facial sayings in form to communicate. Autistic Language

This is commonly used by deaf people or hard of hearing people. But it is also becoming popularly used by a good amount of sectors, especially hearing non verbal children who have from down syndrome, trauma, autism, cerebral palsy, brain disorders and speech disorders. Autistic Language

More and more parents now rely on sign blabber as a mode of quick communication particularly with the children who experience with very brief deliberation spans or limited blabber capabilities. Autism is a brain development disorder which results in damage to social skills, language and behavior. This disorder causes restricted and repetitive behavior which can be identified during infancy or childhood years. Autistic Language

Autism affects many parts of the brain and parents are able to notice signs in the first few years of their child’s life. One of the main questions arising with regard to an autistic child would be whether he/she is ever able to develop speech. According to recent research it is conveyed that with appropriate interventions there is a possibility that children with autism can learn to talk. There are several ways to help autistic children to talk. And the most popular way is to teach speech through the utilization of sign language. Autistic Language

Researchers suggest that the use of sign language increases the chances of autistic children learning the spoken language. In addition it also provides children with an alternative mode of communication. It is easy for parents or caregivers to learn sign language and utilize it while interacting with an autistic child. Also it is found that autistic children are able to learn signing successfully. Autistic Language

Some reasons for this are that signs can be physically guided unlike speech, signs can be frozen in time in order for the child to process it, sign language is more iconic than speech, individual signs can be easily grasped and it is believed that signing is processed in the right hemisphere of the brain. Since research has shown there may be differential disturbance of left hemisphere brain functions in autistic children this might be another reason why signing is easier for them to learn. Autistic Language

Teaching sign language to the child would provide him/her with a way of expressing his/her needs in a manner which is more socially accepted and easily understood. Due to this the child would experience less frustration. Also an increase in social awareness and decrease in tantrums due to frustration will follow with the ability to communicate. Autistic Language

Another more crucial advantage in teaching sign language is that it would lessen some of the learning problems that autistic children face. It is believed that through acquiring sign language early on, the child is able to build up cognitive structures which are the basis for later learning. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Language program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Language is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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