Tag Archives: Special Diet

Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Mary asks…

does autism get better?

My toddler who is 3 yrs old and 5 months is finally talking a little bit, she says “come on, baby up, all done, juice, candy, eat it, and things like that but its rare. Shes coming around really slow. its seems that now that Ive got her to talk a little, shes now rebellious! She wont drink out of her sippy cup, she wants a big girl cup and i have to stand and supervise her everytime she drinks; otherwise, she will spill it all on the floor. she also stopped using her spoon, she pushes it away and says “nope” and shed rather eat with her hands.
I wonder if it has something to do with the 1000iu of vitamin D3 I have her on. Since i put her on vitamin d3 she started to talk a whole lot but she lost her skills of using her spoon and cup, well she uses the open top regular cup just fine….anyway I want to know if your kid has regressed. Before u assume, she doesnt have rett syndrome or anything else, ive had her fragilex test done so its definately autism

admin answers:

I think the ages 2-6 are the most difficult when it comes to a child with autism , It is also the most important time to have your child in a early intervention program. I would not recommend giving vitamins or a special diet to a child unless it is under a Dr,’s care . It is really good that your child is starting to talk. My son did not tale in sentences until 5 years old. However he would repeat words he heard. It was not functional speech .I think some of the behaviors you described reminds me of a typical 2 year old. Trying to exert Independence and do things her way. It is a good sign, not bad. Offer a spoon at each meal , she will use it again. It is really good she wants to be “a big girl” by using a regular cup. My son did regress , but he was younger then your daughter. Most of it was speech related I really think your daughter is starting to test you and see how much she can do all by herself, these are all very good signs.
Autism is a developmental disability , a child does not always “catch up” with this disability.

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6 Benefits of Exercise for Children With ADHD and Autism

A special diet is critically important for children with autism and ADHD to promote a healthy digestive system and heal the gut. But it is only one part of the puzzle.

Exercise is just as important and the following reasons explain how it can help your child:

1. Immune System – The more active children are, the stronger their immune system. They will have fewer colds, allergies, and other diseases like cancer, heart disease and diabetes. A stronger immune system will help our children with autism and ADHD recover more quickly from leaky gut issues and strengthen the effects of a healthy diet.

2. Stress Reduction – Regular exercise reduces the amount of stress hormones in the body. Children with autism and ADHD live with a greater amount of stress because they must constantly adapt and fit into a world not set up for their needs. Exercise will help decrease the buildup of stress hormones and their negative effects on the body.

3. Hyperactivity and Energy Release – When kids are wound up and have difficulty staying calm, a round of exercise is often the perfect solution. Before sitting to do homework or study, have your child do something physical to release any pent up energy. Request exercise or movement breaks for your child during school if your child struggles with sitting still in class. Be sure that the teacher does not take away recess time as a classroom consequence!

4. Brainpower – Exercise increases the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the brain due to increased blood flow throughout the body. This literally means you can think quicker, with increased focus and concentration. The brain functions optimally with regular exercise.

5. Sleep – The more active children are during the day, the more energy they use and the better they will sleep. It will be easier to fall asleep when they are tired out from plenty of exercise.

6. Mood – Hormones called endorphins give us a “feel good” feeling and are associated with happy, positive emotions. Exercise is known to increase the amount of endorphins in the body and contribute to better moods and emotions.

Neurotransmitters like serotonin are also increased due to exercise. These chemicals act as messengers that transmit signals between brain cells. Low serotonin levels are associated with depression and increased levels maintain calm moods and are known to aid in sleep and learning.

Interestingly, only a very small amount of serotonin is present in the brain. 90% of the serotonin in our bodies is found within the intestines! This is part of what is known as the gut-brain connection and a key to why a healthy digestive system is so important for a properly functioning neurological condition.

While diet is key for children with autism and ADHD, exercise is an important boost to your efforts and should not be overlooked.

If you’re a parent of a child with ADHD, ASD and other special needs and are looking for natural methods to help your family, visit Stephani McGirr’s http://www.nourishingjourney.com/ to receive a free twice monthly ezine full of tips, tools and recipes to help you move from struggle to success while creating a peaceful home life your family loves.

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Dietary interventions and Autism

Dietary interventions and Autism

In an effort to do everything possible to help their children, many parents continually seek new treatments. Some treatments are developed by reputable therapists or by parents of a child with ASD. Although an unproven treatment may help one child, it may not prove beneficial to another. To be accepted as a proven treatment, it should undergo clinical trials, preferably randomized, double-blind trials that would allow for a comparison between treatment and no treatment. Some of the interventions that have been reported to be helpful to some children, but whose clinical efficacy or safety have not been proven, are mentioned below.

Sausages may contain gluten via fillers or bin... Image via Wikipedia

Dietary interventions are based on the belief that 1) food allergies cause symptoms of autism, and 2) an insufficiency of a specific vitamin or mineral may cause some autistic symptoms. If parents decide to try a special diet for a given period of time, they should make sure that the child’s nutritional status is measured carefully.

A diet that some parents have found to be helpful to their autistic child is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Gluten is a casein-like substance that is found in the seeds of various cereal plants – wheat, oat, rye, and barley. Casein is the principal protein in milk. Since gluten and milk are found in many of the foods we eat, following a gluten-free, casein-free diet is difficult.

A supplement that some parents find to be beneficial for an autistic child is Vitamin B6, taken with magnesium (which makes the vitamin effective). The result of research studies is not conclusive; some children respond positively, some negatively, some not at all or very little.

In the search for a treatment of autism, there has been discussion lately about the use of secretin, a substance approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a single dose normally given to aid in diagnosis of a gastrointestinal problem. Anecdotal reports have shown improvement in autism symptoms, including sleep patterns, eye contact, language skills, and alertness. Several clinical trials conducted in the last few years have found no significant improvements in symptoms between patients who received secretin and those who received a placebo.

Karyn Seroussi, the mother of a formerly autistic boy, researched how dietary changes can affect autism, and used dietary exclusion to improve her son’s condition. Such treatments are part of the controversies in autism. She is known for her parent support advocacy efforts, and is the author of a book entitled Unraveling the Mystery of Autism & PDD: A Mother’s Story of Research and Recovery.

Seroussi’s work primarily addresses the debate between parents and professionals about what causes autism, and advocates the belief that in most cases it is a medically treatable disorder, through dietary and behavioral interventions, which needs to be diagnosed early and investigated appropriately.

Author Karyn Seroussi says her son now has no traces of autism, due in large part to a strict GFCF [gluten-free, casein-free] diet. Some parents report improved eye contact, less constipation or diarrhea, and better behavior. However, other parents do not notice a difference in their children.

Besides gluten and casein, some parents report that removing corn or soy led to equal or greater improvements in their children. Because soy protein is similar to gluten and casein, some diet proponents recommend removing it if the child seems sensitive.

Dietary and Other Interventions

In the past several years a great deal of emphasis has been placed on using a diet to control a number of conditions, including autism. There has been much talk about whether food sensitivities and allergies are the underlying cause for the severity of some symptoms of autism or, indeed, the symptoms themselves.

Although some people claim results of diet changes to be as dramatic as complete recovery from autism, most people agree that a change of diet isn’t a cure for autism because, in fact, there is no cure. However, proponents of dietary management of autism agree that many symptoms will decrease in severity and some may even disappear.
The most widely used diet for autism management is the Gluten Free/Casein Free (or GFCF) diet.

In addition to the theory of dietary management of autism, some believe that autism can be managed through the use of supplements to replace nutrients that are lacking.

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Dietary interventions

View the original article here

Dietary interventions and Autism

Dietary interventions and Autism

In an effort to do everything possible to help their children, many parents continually seek new treatments. Some treatments are developed by reputable therapists or by parents of a child with ASD. Although an unproven treatment may help one child, it may not prove beneficial to another. To be accepted as a proven treatment, it should undergo clinical trials, preferably randomized, double-blind trials that would allow for a comparison between treatment and no treatment. Some of the interventions that have been reported to be helpful to some children, but whose clinical efficacy or safety have not been proven, are mentioned below.

Sausages may contain gluten via fillers or bin... Image via Wikipedia

Dietary interventions are based on the belief that 1) food allergies cause symptoms of autism, and 2) an insufficiency of a specific vitamin or mineral may cause some autistic symptoms. If parents decide to try a special diet for a given period of time, they should make sure that the child’s nutritional status is measured carefully.

A diet that some parents have found to be helpful to their autistic child is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Gluten is a casein-like substance that is found in the seeds of various cereal plants – wheat, oat, rye, and barley. Casein is the principal protein in milk. Since gluten and milk are found in many of the foods we eat, following a gluten-free, casein-free diet is difficult.

A supplement that some parents find to be beneficial for an autistic child is Vitamin B6, taken with magnesium (which makes the vitamin effective). The result of research studies is not conclusive; some children respond positively, some negatively, some not at all or very little.

In the search for a treatment of autism, there has been discussion lately about the use of secretin, a substance approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a single dose normally given to aid in diagnosis of a gastrointestinal problem. Anecdotal reports have shown improvement in autism symptoms, including sleep patterns, eye contact, language skills, and alertness. Several clinical trials conducted in the last few years have found no significant improvements in symptoms between patients who received secretin and those who received a placebo.

Karyn Seroussi, the mother of a formerly autistic boy, researched how dietary changes can affect autism, and used dietary exclusion to improve her son’s condition. Such treatments are part of the controversies in autism. She is known for her parent support advocacy efforts, and is the author of a book entitled Unraveling the Mystery of Autism & PDD: A Mother’s Story of Research and Recovery.

Seroussi’s work primarily addresses the debate between parents and professionals about what causes autism, and advocates the belief that in most cases it is a medically treatable disorder, through dietary and behavioral interventions, which needs to be diagnosed early and investigated appropriately.

Author Karyn Seroussi says her son now has no traces of autism, due in large part to a strict GFCF [gluten-free, casein-free] diet. Some parents report improved eye contact, less constipation or diarrhea, and better behavior. However, other parents do not notice a difference in their children.

Besides gluten and casein, some parents report that removing corn or soy led to equal or greater improvements in their children. Because soy protein is similar to gluten and casein, some diet proponents recommend removing it if the child seems sensitive.

Dietary and Other Interventions

In the past several years a great deal of emphasis has been placed on using a diet to control a number of conditions, including autism. There has been much talk about whether food sensitivities and allergies are the underlying cause for the severity of some symptoms of autism or, indeed, the symptoms themselves.

Although some people claim results of diet changes to be as dramatic as complete recovery from autism, most people agree that a change of diet isn’t a cure for autism because, in fact, there is no cure. However, proponents of dietary management of autism agree that many symptoms will decrease in severity and some may even disappear.
The most widely used diet for autism management is the Gluten Free/Casein Free (or GFCF) diet.

In addition to the theory of dietary management of autism, some believe that autism can be managed through the use of supplements to replace nutrients that are lacking.

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Dietary interventions

View the original article here

What Is Autism?

Autism is a social development disorder that is typically diagnosed in early childhood. Some of the symptoms of this disorder include: failure to speak by the age of 2, resisting affection, failure to make eye contact, repetitive behaviour such as hand flapping or rocking and sensitivity to light sound or touch. It is important to note that the intensity of the symptoms can vary greatly.

What causes Autism?

Autism is a very complex condition and doctors have not been able to identify an exact cause. They believe that combinations of genetic and environmental factors are to blame for this condition. The number of children being diagnosed with autism has increased in the past few years. Many believe that the chemicals in vaccines can cause autism. However, researchers have not been able to identify a link between vaccinations and autism.

What are some of the risk factors for autism?

Boys are three times more likely to develop autism than girls. Children who are born to parents over the age of 40 are also more likely to develop autism. Additionally, family history also plays a role in the development of this condition.

What are some autism treatment options available?

Currently, there is no cure for autism. However, there are some autism treatments available that can make it easier for a child to deal with this condition. The type of treatment that the doctor prescribes depends on the severity of the condition.

Children who have behavioural problems will usually be prescribed an antidepressant or antipsychotic drug. Autistic children who have difficulty speaking may benefit from speech therapy. Educational programs that place emphasis on developing social and communication skills can also be beneficial.

Can Autism be treated at home?

There has been some evidence to suggest a special diet can benefit children who have autism. The autism diet is free of yeast, gluten and casein. This diet also encourages dietary supplements such as Vitamin A, Omega 3 Fatty acids, Vitamin B-12, magnesium and folic acid. Parents and caregivers should always consult with the child’s doctor before placing him on a special diet.

Raising a child with autism can be difficult and frustrating, but the best thing that parents and caregivers can do is make sure that the child feels loved and supported at all times. They should also make sure that they take the time to learn all they can about this disorder so that they can know how to better help their child.

Can autism be prevented?

Unfortunately, since doctors do not know exactly what causes autism, there is nothing that can be done to prevent it. Parents and caregivers should watch for the signs and symptoms so that the child can get the necessary help that he needs.

For more on autism treatment, visit Autism Care UK, a supplier of quality care homes throughout the UK.

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Here Is What You Need To Do When Your Child Is Identified With Aspergers

On Aspergers Syndrome have an effect on the kid, then the main symptom is that the kid has difficulty in conversating with other children, and the foremost challenging part for them is lack of socialization skills. So the treatment program which you decide on ought to help them to understand about social interaction and additionally facilitate them to manage themselves in all social situations. They ought to always be encouraged to socialize with other kids in their age group, because it will help them to learn the socialization skills they will need anon in life.

A kid with Aspergers will typically have a treatment plan that uses positive reinforcement and behavior modification. Essentially, this will involve you commending your child for doing something well. One more symptom of Aspergers is the child turning into obsessed with a particular item or topic. Try to encourage them to try and do things not related to their obsession and commend them after they do. However, be sure that you do not overuse positive reinforcement, as it might come back off as being phony.

Together with obsessing and lacking socialization skills, your kid who has been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome could conjointly expertise gastrointestinal issues and could require a special diet. Research is constant on this and the main focus is on removing gluten and casein from their diets. Studies have shown that children with a diagnosis of autism have improved greatly by removing this stuff from the diet and your kid’s treatment plan should include a visit to a nutritionist to assist you come up with a set up for your child’s diagnosis.

While a lot of mom or dad are usually devastated by their kid’s diagnosis of Aspergers, it’s necessary not to forget that each child is totally different, as well as their specific levels of symptoms. Several children with this diagnosis often learn to address their syndrome and lead productive lives. But, to try and do so, you need to create bound you give them with a particular treatment plan that is based around their own specific symptoms.

If you would like to grasp what you need to do when your kid has been clinically determined with aspergers, then visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com and take guidance from Dave Angel. Dave Angel is an experienced social worker and has helped literally lots of families and the kids around the world who have Aspergers. He is the author of the simplest-selling ebook “The Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide” and has many websites for parents of children with Aspergers.
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