Tag Archives: Social Deficits

Question?: What Is Autism

William asks…

How to state my thesis of Autism and it’s social deficits?

I’m having the hardest time getting started on my essay. The essay is going to be concern the social deficits in those with autism. I’ve talked to my professor, and I don’t want to make her think I’m slacking off since I have to have work associated with the thesis on Thursday.

Any help, or even a good nudge in the right direction would be especially appreciated.

admin answers:

I do not see autism as having any more social deficits than any other child. Every child is born with certain instincts, and reflexes, and autistic children are no different. From then on, EVERY child that was ever born needs to be taught social skills. The lack is not in the autistic child, it is in the adults around the child who have not figured out a way to reach that particular child. Please use the word challenges, not deficits. Thank you.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism Video

Sharon asks…

What’s the difference between autism and mental retardation?

I’m curious. I have adhd and anxiety, and (I suspect sort of strongly) aspergers

I was watching vids on lower function autism, and some of the people were making disgruntled noises a lot, throwing fits/tantrums, sucking thumb, etc.

admin answers:

Mental retardation’s criteria is a low Intelligence Quotient (IQ).

Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnostic criteria includes social deficits, communication deficits, and odd behavior (repetitive actions, self-stimulating – like you saw on the video.).

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Unreliable Neural Responses May Induce Autism Symptoms

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Epilepsy;  Schizophrenia
Article Date: 21 Sep 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Unreliable Neural Responses May Induce Autism Symptoms
4 starsnot yet rated
Diverse symptoms associated with autism could be explained by unreliable activity of neurons in the brain in response to basic, nonsocial sensory information, according to a study published by Cell Press in the journal Neuron. The new findings suggest that autism is a disorder of general neural processing and could potentially provide an explanation for the origins of a range of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

“Within the autism research community, most researchers are looking for either a dysfunctional brain region or inadequate connections between brain regions,” says lead study author Ilan Dinstein of Carnegie Mellon University. “We’re taking a different approach and thinking about how a general characteristic of the brain could be different in autism – and how that might lead to behavioral changes.”

Autism is a developmental disorder marked by social deficits, communication problems, and repetitive behaviors. Two previous studies suggested that the neural responses of individuals with autism are more variable than those of control subjects during visual and motor tasks. Building on this past evidence, Dinstein and his collaborators have now shown that multiple sensory systems within these individuals show noisy responses, suggesting that widespread behavioral abnormalities could arise from a basic dysfunction in neural processing that emerges during development.

In the study, adults with autism participated in functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments in which their brain activity was measured under three different conditions: while they watched moving dots on a screen, listened to tone beeps, and felt air puffs on their hands. The neural responses to all three types of sensory information were less reliable across trials in individuals with autism than in control subjects.

The findings suggest that autism could result from fundamental defects in general neural processing rather than a collection of independent problems that affect different brain regions. “Unreliable neural activity is a general property that could have a profound impact on the function of many brain systems and could underlie a range of cognitive and social abnormalities,” says study author Marlene Behrmann of Carnegie Mellon University. “So we think that this problem could play a role not only in autism, but also potentially in other disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Dinstein et al.: “Unreliable evoked responses in autism.”
Video: Marlene Behrmann, Professor of Psychology, and IIan Dinstein, Postdoctoral Researcher, from Carnegie Mellon University’s Department of Psychology discuss their study “Autistic Adults have Unreliable Neural Sensory Responses” publishing in Neuron.
Cell Press Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Unreliable Neural Responses May Induce Autism Symptoms.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 21 Sep. 2012. Web.
26 Sep. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Unreliable Neural Responses May Induce Autism Symptoms’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Functional Links Between Autism And Genes Explained

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Genetics
Article Date: 24 Jun 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
‘ Functional Links Between Autism And Genes Explained’
5 starsnot yet rated
A pioneering report of genome-wide gene expression in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) finds genetic changes that help explain why one person has an ASD and another does not. The study, published by Cell Press in The American Journal of Human Genetics, pinpoints ASD risk factors by comparing changes in gene expression with DNA mutation data in the same individuals. This innovative approach is likely to pave the way for future personalized medicine, not just for ASD but also for any disease with a genetic component.

ASDs are a heterogeneous group of developmental conditions characterized by social deficits, difficulty communicating, and repetitive behaviors. ASDs are thought to be highly heritable, meaning that they run in families. However, the genetics of autism are complex.

Researchers have found rare changes in the number of copies of defined genetic regions that associate with ASD. Although there are some hot-spot regions containing these alterations, very few genetic changes are exactly alike. Similarly, no two autistic people share the exact same symptoms. To discover how these genetic changes might affect gene transcription and, thus, the presentation of the disorder, Rui Luo, a graduate student in the Geschwind lab at UCLA, studied 244 families in which one child (the proband) was affected with an ASD and one was not.

In addition to identifying several potential new regions where copy-number variants (CNVs) are associated with ASDs, Geschwind’s team found genes within these regions to be significantly misregulated in ASD children compared with their unaffected siblings. “Strikingly, we observed a higher incidence of haploinsufficient genes in the rare CNVs in probands than in those of siblings, strongly indicating a functional impact of these CNVs on expression,” says Geschwind. Haploinsuffiency occurs when only one copy of a gene is functional; the result is that the body cannot produce a normal amount of protein. The researchers also found a significant enrichment of misexpressed genes in neural-related pathways in ASD children. Previous research has found that these pathways include other genetic variants associated with autism, which Geschwind explains further legitimizes the present findings.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Luo et al.: “Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Functional Impact of Rare De Novo and Recurrent CNVs in Autism Spectrum Disorders.”
Cell Press Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Cell Press. ” Functional Links Between Autism And Genes Explained.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 24 Jun. 2012. Web.
24 Jun. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘ Functional Links Between Autism And Genes Explained’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Finding That Oxytocin Improves Brain Function In Children With Autism Could Lead To Treatment For Associated Social Deficits

Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 21 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
‘Finding That Oxytocin Improves Brain Function In Children With Autism Could Lead To Treatment For Associated Social Deficits’
4 stars3 stars
Preliminary results from an ongoing, large-scale study by Yale School of Medicine researchers shows that oxytocin – a naturally occurring substance produced in the brain and throughout the body – increased brain function in regions that are known to process social information in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

A Yale Child Study Center research team that includes postdoctoral fellow Ilanit Gordon and Kevin Pelphrey, the Harris Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry and Psychology, presented the results at the International Meeting for Autism Research.

“Our findings provide the first, critical steps toward devising more effective treatments for the core social deficits in autism, which may involve a combination of clinical interventions with an administration of oxytocin,” said Gordon. “Such a treatment approach will fundamentally improve our understanding of autism and its treatment.”

Social-communicative dysfunctions are a core characteristic of autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder that can have an enormous emotional and financial burden on the affected individual, their families, and society.

Gordon said that while a great deal of progress has been made in the field of autism research, there remain few effective treatments and none that directly target the core social dysfunction. Oxytocin has recently received attention for its involvement in regulating social abilities because of its role in many aspects of social behavior and social cognition in humans and other species.

To assess the impact of oxytocin on the brain function, Gordon and her team conducted a first-of-its-kind, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on children and adolescents aged 7 to 18 with ASD. The team members gave the children a single dose of oxytocin in a nasal spray and used functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to observe its effect.

The team found that oxytocin increased activations in brain regions known to process social information. Gordon said these brain activations were linked to tasks involving multiple social information processing routes, such as seeing, hearing, and processing information relevant to understanding other people.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Other authors on the study include Randi H. Bennett, Brent C. vander Wyk, James F. Leckman, and Ruth Feldman.
Yale University Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Yale University. “Finding That Oxytocin Improves Brain Function In Children With Autism Could Lead To Treatment For Associated Social Deficits.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 21 May. 2012. Web.
1 Jun. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.



‘Finding That Oxytocin Improves Brain Function In Children With Autism Could Lead To Treatment For Associated Social Deficits’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Genetic Systems Disrupted In Autistic Brain

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Genetics
Article Date: 03 May 2012 – 1:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

5 starsnot yet rated
Autism has a strong genetic basis, but so far efforts to identify the responsible genes have had mixed results. The reason for this is that autism is influenced by many different genes, and different genes are involved in different individuals, making it hard to find the common genetic ground between patients.

Now, research conducted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has shown that despite this fact, the different genes involved in autism tend to be involved in specific processes in the brain. This can explain, on the one hand, similarities in the behavioral symptoms of different autistics, but also the large spectrum of behaviors observed in different autistic individuals.

The Hebrew University research, conducted by Dr. Sagiv Shifman and his doctoral student Eyal Ben-David of the Department of Genetics at the Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, has potential implications for early diagnosis as well as for treatment of autism in the future. The study was recently published in the journal PLoS Genetics.

Autism spectrum disorders are neurodevelopmental syndromes characterized by social deficits, language impairments and repetitive behaviors. Recent studies indicate that autism is considerably more common than previously supposed, with a prevalence rate that is high as 1% in some regions.

The main goal of the Hebrew University project was to test the contribution of rare genetic mutations, as well as the genetic variations which are common in the population, and to see whether these different types of genetic risk factors are related. Instead of testing individual genes, the researchers chose to study gene collections, in an attempt to understand general pathways involved in autism.

To that end the scientists constructed a network based on the expression pattern of genes across different brain areas. This allowed them to discover groups of genes with shared function in the brain. Next, based on genetic data from thousands of families with autistic children, the researchers studied the contribution of different groups of genes to autism.

To their surprise, they found — when looking at mutations found in autism as well as thousands of common gene variants that are more frequently seen in autistics — that these mutations and variations are located in specific functional groups.

When looking at families with one autistic individual (sporadic cases), and in families where there is more than one affected individual (multiplex cases), the same variants were seen acting in both cases. These groups of genes are highly active in the first year of life, and are involved in processes of learning, memory, and sensory perception.

The Hebrew University scientists believe that their work could pave the way for large-scale genetic scans in the future that could allow for early diagnosis of autism. Further, the results of their study provide a ray of hope that by concentrating on specific gene groups, it will one day be possible to design drugs which could alleviate symptoms.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. “Genetic Systems Disrupted In Autistic Brain.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 3 May. 2012. Web.
4 May. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Genetic Systems Disrupted In Autistic Brain’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Understanding the Autism Spectrum

The terminology that is oftentimes used in order to describe and diagnose disorders that are classified as pervasive developmental disorders is referred to as the Autism Spectrum. Pervasive developmental disorders include Autism, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, and Rett Syndrome. They are typically characterized by cognitive delays, communication difficulties, repetitive or stereotyped behaviors and interests and social deficits.

Despite the fact that these diagnoses have some features in common, the individuals who are afflicted with these disorders are considered as being “on the Autism Spectrum” because of the differences in severity exhibited from one individual to the next.

As we mentioned above, there are five categories of pervasive developmental disorders and are broken down as follows:

Autism – characterized by abnormal functioning or delays prior to age 3 in one or more of the following areas communication, repetitive, restrictive, and stereotyped patterns of activity, behavior, or interest and poor social interaction.

These deficits are all characterized by specific aspects and elements that are unique to each of those three areas.

Most of the developmental delays are distinguished in each child by the deviance of or lack of delays in early language development. Additionally, those individuals who have been diagnosed with autism typically do not exhibit any cognitive delays.

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder – unlike the aforementioned two areas, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder is usually characterized by the loss of functioning or significant regression after the first two years of development. The child afflicted with this might lose their communication skills, motor functioning, nonverbal behaviors, and certain skills that have been learned already.

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified – a “sub-threshold” form of Autism because of the fact that it is characterized by milder Autism symptoms or those symptoms that exist in a single domain such as social difficulties.

Rett Syndrome – is characterized by numerous deficits that follow a period where functions appear normal after birth while only occurring in females. It is characterized by a loss of acquired language and social engagement skills, loss of expressive or meaningful hand skills, decelerated growth of the children’s head and poor physical coordination

The risk of comorbidity tends to increase as the individual ages and may make things difficult for the younger adults. This makes intervention or treatment extremely challenging. Furthermore, distinguishing between Autism Spectrum disorders and other diagnoses is a challenge in itself because they will sometimes overlap the symptoms that characterize other disorders.

So, characteristics of current Autism Spectrum disorders make it difficult for the more standard types of diagnostic procedures to be done accurately. In spite of this, comorbid disorders tend to fall into the following six categories where they can be easily identified as anxiety disorders, behavior-related disorders, intellectual disabilities, medical conditions, mood disorders and sensory processing disorders.

You want to remember that the more you know regarding the Autism Spectrum, the easier it will be for you to learn how to manage your child’s symptoms.

For the latest videos and training information on child development as well as books and curricula on Autism please visit childdevelopmentmedia.com.

View the original article here

Adult Symptoms of Autism

“Autism Spectrum” describes disorders that are often called “pervasive developmental disorders”. These include Asperger syndrome, autism, childhood disintegrative disorder and Rett syndrome. Symptoms for these disorders include social deficits, difficulties communicating, repetitive behaviors, stereotyped behaviors and cognitive delays. The difference in the individuals with these disorders are in the severity experienced.

In your search to read more about the symptoms of autism in adults you encountered a lot of sights sponsored and supported by the pharmaceutical industry, who, at present, is quite alarmed that they might lose the battle against autism and Alzheimer’s to the alternative medical professions utilizing integrative modalities of care.

One reason people develop the symptoms of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) is because when they went to their regular doctors for checkups, and blood tests were performed, the doctors and laboratories that did the testing used normal ranges. What’s wrong with using ‘normal ranges’?

Doctors order blood tests all the time. What the normal range is on the blood test is based on the mean averages of the last 1000 people tested by the lab. But these people are not well and the ranges are too large. A more healthy range is a more narrow range…that is the optimum range. Had the doctors of these patients with alzheimer’s, before they had Alzheimer’s, told them that their blood values were less than optimal, even though they were barely within clinical ranges of normal, then they could have taken measures to correct these less than optimal blood values. A more stringent range encourages us to take healthy measures before we are stricken with an ailment as distressing as Alzheimer’s.

Often people’s values fall into the ‘normal’ range, they are told, “all is well”, and yet they feel chronically fatigued, not quite right, have anxiety and depression, or are beginning to have the cognitive symptoms of adult autism and they don’t know why…after all the blood test says there is nothing wrong with them. Then one day, John Doe dies of a heart attack and everyone thought he was doing fine.

Blood is a good indicator and in the work I do I use a more narrow range, a more stringent range. I make corrections BEFORE problems progress to a more serious state. With cancer now exceeding cardio-vascular as the major cause of death in the U.S. we have to react preventatively well in advance of major diseases. And with PDD on the rise in our youth and in adults we have to make blood and hair value corrections early enough to prevent changes on deeper levels – do nothing and health gets worse!

Adding a hair analysis to the equation makes good sense. It tells us about many items that are not usually tested in the blood. In the work I do I test for 52 items in the blood and 30 in the hair. The hair can show us which of 18 heavy metals have accumulated in our tissues. These heavy metals may be responsible for PDD and other ailments for which, as of yet, the regular medical profession says they do not know cures.

For those with adult symptoms of autism a urine and stool analysis should be considered as well. Constant depletion of nutrients from the body affects brain function. Heavy metals also have the ability to block chemical reactions in the body thereby depleting vitamin stores and causing the production of free radicals. Free radicals interfere with chemical pathways. The more we are unable to create all the molecules we need for normal function the more we are running on 3 cylinders!

Aluminum has been implicated in alzheimer’s. A hair analysis will show aluminum in the hair. The heavy metals and the essentials elements, mostly minerals, that the hair analysis will pick up, are an indication of what the body is trying to get rid of. The body uses hair to deposit unwanted substances. When aluminum is high in the hair it indicates that the body is doing well eliminating the aluminum but it also means that the aluminum shouldn’t have been there in the first place.

Dr. Thomas has 33 years of experience treating chronic conditions.

Treating chronic disease is a complicated and tedious work. Most physicians can only spend a few minutes with each patient as their clinic owners and hospital management force them to keep on the move. Dr. Thomas spends half an hour just explaining what tests will be done…then he spends an hour going over the test results with you and discussing nutrient cures. He also requests that you check in with him once a month for at least a half hour to go over your symptoms and to discuss your nutrients.

33 years experience has taught Dr. Thomas the value of quality care, personal patient/doctor interaction and just what is required to obtain lasting results.

Refer to my website for more information on this topic and to watch videos from the television show I do on Nutritional Medicines by Lab Analysis.

Adult Symptoms of Autism

View the original article here

Speech therapy and autism

Speech therapy and autism

The purpose of speech-language therapy is to enhance intentional communication via expression of ideas, obtaining desires, sharing information and interpersonal interaction. Language is the means by which communication is achieved.

Speech is a troubling issue in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Some children develop speech in time according to milestones, and then regress, losing all speech. Some children develop speech in time, but talk so much you’d like to pull your hair out, and some children never develop speech and are completely nonverbal. Every child is different in the “speech” part of the Autism Spectrum Disorder disability. Whether your child is verbal or nonverbal, don’t give up hope. Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders begin to speak with one-on-one speech therapy. Others make incredible strides with PECS (Picture Exchange Communication System) and other visual cues.

Speech therapy will help both verbal and nonverbal children with autism. Before you begin therapy, you will likely have to complete a speech evaluation from a licensed speech language pathologist. After completing a series of tests with your child, the therapist should be able to tell you whether your child would benefit from speech therapy or qualifies for speech therapy. Remember, vocabulary isn’t the only part of speech.
Children with autism have a severely limited ability to speak in social settings, also known as pragmatic speech. Pragmatics is knowing how to use language appropriately in social settings. As children with autism already have social deficits, speech is impaired more by their limited social skills, which makes for very awkward and odd speech patterns. The ability to converse is severely limited in most cases.

Speech Therapy can help autistic children with any level of speech disorder – from the completely non-verbal to the child who talks incessantly. Before beginning a Speech Therapy program, you and your child will work with a trained Speech Therapist to complete an evaluation. Your child will undergo testing and the therapist will report on ways he or she believes speech therapy will help your child.

As with any treatment program, early intervention is best. However, Speech Therapy is also effective with older children. Some areas addressed in Speech Therapy for autistic children may include:
• Helping the child to understand social interaction and ways he or she can affect his or her environment.
• A desire to communicate.
• Paying attention and listening skills.
• Play skills.
• Understanding verbal communication.
• Social skills.
• Improved speech rate and rhythm.

Enter your name and email to receive the first chapters of my book “Asperger’s Syndrome in Layman’s Terms” free

Tagged as: Speech therapy and autism

View the original article here

Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism

Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 05 Mar 2012 – 1:00 PST

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

5 starsnot yet rated
Impaired social function is a cardinal symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the brain circuits that enable us to relate to other people is the “mirror neuron” system. This brain circuit is activated when we watch other people, and allows our brains to represent the actions of others, influencing our ability to learn new tasks and to understand the intentions and experiences of other people.

This mirror neuron system is impaired in individuals with ASD and better understanding the neurobiology of this system could help in the development of new treatments.

In their new study, Dr. Peter Enticott at Monash University and his colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation to stimulate the brains of individuals with ASD and healthy individuals while they observed different hand gestures. This allowed the researchers to measure the activity of each individual’s mirror neuron system with millisecond precision in response to each observed action.

They found that the individuals with ASD showed a blunted brain response to stimulation of the motor cortex when viewing a transitive hand gesture. In other words, the mirror neuron system in the ASD individuals became less activated when watching the gestures, compared to the healthy group. In addition, among people with ASD, less mirror neuron activity was associated with greater social impairments. This finding adds to the evidence that deficits in mirror neuron system functioning contribute to the social deficits in ASD.

This finding also directly links a specific type of brain dysfunction in people with autism spectrum disorder to a specific symptom. This is important because “we do not have a substantial understanding of the brain basis of autism spectrum disorder, or a validated biomedical treatment for the disorder,” said Dr. Enticott. “If we can develop a substantial understanding of the biology of specific symptoms, this will allow us to develop treatments targeted specifically to the symptoms.”

“This study is an example of the effort to break down the component problems associated with autism spectrum disorder and to map these problems on to particular brain circuits,” commented Dr. John Krystal, editor of Biological Psychiatry.

Enticott added, “We are currently investigating whether non-invasive brain stimulation can be used to improve mirror neuron activity in autism spectrum disorder, which would have substantial potential therapeutic implications.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The article is “Mirror Neuron Activity Associated with Social Impairments but not Age in Autism Spectrum Disorder” by Peter G. Enticott, Hayley A. Kennedy, Nicole J. Rinehart, Bruce J. Tonge, John L. Bradshaw, John R. Taffe, Zafiris J. Daskalakis, and Paul B. Fitzgerald (doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.09.001). The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 71, Issue 5 (March 1, 2012), published by Elsevier.
The authors’ affiliations, and disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available in the article.
John H. Krystal, M.D., is Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine and a research psychiatrist at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. His disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available here.
Elsevier Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Elsevier. “Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 5 Mar. 2012. Web.
9 Mar. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Nancy on 6 Mar 2012 at 6:15 am

My impression from the article is that in order for the
Child to comprehend the movement , it should be repeated or
Exaggerated in order for there to be comprehension.

In practicality it does not make sense to me.

Please correct me as to it’s application.

Thanks,
Nancy

| post followup | alert a moderator |


‘Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here