Tag Archives: Sentences

Question?: Treatment For Autism In Babies

Chris asks…

Will Autism Be With A person For Life Will it go away and they will be normal?

OK my little brother is 3 years old and he was diagnosed with autism. He cant speak in sentences and when we tell him to do something its like we are talking another Language. He can say words but most of the time he talks like he is still 1 year old and my baby sister is 1 year old and she is already saying words. When will my little brother actually start speaking in sentences and stop saying nonsense, o and my little cousin who is only 2 is already saying things in sentences and when you ask him to do something he listens.

admin answers:

Autism is for life (beware of those offering quack treatments/cures: do real research)

It is an essentially inherited condition, at core being about having a brain wired significantly differently from the statistically average.
This leads to differences in sensation, perception, and thought-processes, and the expression of that can vary immensely from one individual to another.

” like we are talking another Language.”
To a fair degree you may be. Finding out the best modes of communication and learning for each individual on the autistic spectrum is an important task.
You don’t help a Frenchman to learn English by shouting at him in English. It goes best if you have learned some French first.
Similarly with understanding the autistic perspective on the world while teaching the larger world to the person with autism.

“When will my little brother actually start speaking in sentences[?]”
We vary. There is no rule.
I know of one child who didn’t speak a word till seven, but her first “word” was a complex, perfectly-formed sentence.

I know another who can barely speak, but is incredibly fluent on the computer.
We tend to come with very spiky ability profiles: it can be a major mistake to judge us only by what we are poor at. Or good at.

We do learn, again, in varying degree, especially with the right forms of teaching and support.

Personally I don’t have “normal” as an objective, beyond basic life skills etc.
I can do “social” and “normal” very well, having learnt it the hard way like an academic subject rather than instinctively. It’s there when I want to be, or have to be, social.

But I can’t be bothered with being conventional purely for conformity’s sake.
Why should I be interested in, or join in with, much of what “most people” like, when I am not “most people”?

But then I’m old enough and verbal enough to express that.
Not all of us are.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Mary asks…

does autism get better?

My toddler who is 3 yrs old and 5 months is finally talking a little bit, she says “come on, baby up, all done, juice, candy, eat it, and things like that but its rare. Shes coming around really slow. its seems that now that Ive got her to talk a little, shes now rebellious! She wont drink out of her sippy cup, she wants a big girl cup and i have to stand and supervise her everytime she drinks; otherwise, she will spill it all on the floor. she also stopped using her spoon, she pushes it away and says “nope” and shed rather eat with her hands.
I wonder if it has something to do with the 1000iu of vitamin D3 I have her on. Since i put her on vitamin d3 she started to talk a whole lot but she lost her skills of using her spoon and cup, well she uses the open top regular cup just fine….anyway I want to know if your kid has regressed. Before u assume, she doesnt have rett syndrome or anything else, ive had her fragilex test done so its definately autism

admin answers:

I think the ages 2-6 are the most difficult when it comes to a child with autism , It is also the most important time to have your child in a early intervention program. I would not recommend giving vitamins or a special diet to a child unless it is under a Dr,’s care . It is really good that your child is starting to talk. My son did not tale in sentences until 5 years old. However he would repeat words he heard. It was not functional speech .I think some of the behaviors you described reminds me of a typical 2 year old. Trying to exert Independence and do things her way. It is a good sign, not bad. Offer a spoon at each meal , she will use it again. It is really good she wants to be “a big girl” by using a regular cup. My son did regress , but he was younger then your daughter. Most of it was speech related I really think your daughter is starting to test you and see how much she can do all by herself, these are all very good signs.
Autism is a developmental disability , a child does not always “catch up” with this disability.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Laura asks…

3 year old daughter’s speech. Need other parents’ advice!?

A few days ago, I read a book titled, “The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late” by Thomas Sowell. The book is of course about children who don’t speak or speak very little until they are between 2-4 years old. It emphasizes that bright children also can begin to speak very early, but (focuses on those who do not.)

My daughter is nearly 3. She does not carry on a conversation with anyone, points to most things she wants or we have to “read” her to pick up on what she needs. She sings the alphabet song, counts 1-20, says some sentences that I can comprehend but other sentences I cannot understand. Most times, I only know she is speaking actual sentences when she is going along with what she has “memorized” from commercials or movies while watching them- sometimes she just sits down and recites the movies and commercials from memory, although her words “jumble” together to the point where someone who didn’t know her wouldn’t know she was actually talking. She also loves to cuddle, hug, and play with other children, and she seems to understand some commands very well, and at other times she does not.

I read in the above book that “experts” are too quick to label a child “slow”, autistic, or as having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder when the child is only highly intelligent, strong willed, or just going at his or her own time-frame when it comes to social interactions and learning the practicalities of everyday life. Many of the late talkers in his study grew up to be engineers, mathematicians, or in other fields which require significant analytical skills. I am not suggesting that my daughter will be a genius. I just have a feeling that she should be allowed to “prosper” naturally. Certain people-those who haven’t had children in 30-60 years and one controlling, passive aggressive doctor (forgive me God for the criticism) who wouldn’t respect my questions and suggestions as a parent-think she needs help! I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with similar children, I would love your input! I have already read about parents of adult children who had similar “difficulties” as children and had no medical intervention; those adults are doing well.

I do not want to overlook a “problem” that may in fact exist. I am very nervous about taking my daughter to a specialist who may interpret a problem where there is none. I know I’m probably answering my own question, but…

What do you think?
A specialist can’t always tell the difference in my opinion, but thank you soooo much Sari Lynn for your insight!
Thank you Happymomof2. All I can say is that I know what you mean about worrying when I shouldn’t and being made to feel that what is actually “normal” is a delay or problem. I know I shouldn’t worry. My gut tells me everything is okay. It’s only an insecurity that gets me to ask for other people’s opinions about my daughter. I am a stay at home mom and will continue to work with her in a steady fashion. I know she will “catch up!”
Lauren R, I will surely take your advice! Thanks for the info! I worry about being impressionable and influenced if I were to find services available to my daughter, but realizing that I would be in total control of her health and safety help me to not be afraid to work with the professionals if I have to!
ADDED: In the meantime, why don’t you read information from reputable, science-based sources rather than pop-culture sensationalistic books (see below for links).
The Einstein story makes me crazy: Einstein was a genius in one particular area, but a total incompetent in many social (communication!) areas,~Anonymous

Anonymous, it seems as though you’re trying to be “kind” in your response. But, I don’t feel comfortable. I worry enough about my daughter, which is why I’m afraid to go to a specialist who may refer to her as “incompetent”! So, what would that make the specialist? Maybe she does need speech therapy, but I will be sure not to go to someone who labels her “incompetent”! Who says you do well in all your social interactions with others-you just learn to disguise your “fumbles” through the way you’ve learned to communicate!
I stated “I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with SIMILAR children, I would love your input!”
EDIT: THANK YOU so much for your post Beetlemilk. I will take heed to and look into all the info you have given me!

admin answers:

You are the foremost expert on your child, not any doctor.

I am very similar to your daughter and am 38 yrs old. My father has similarities too. In 1975 I was referred to a behavioral psychologist for peculiar vernacular, and addressing my parents by their names and not pronouns. I was promptly diagnosed ‘Autistic’. I went on to receive many diagnoses, most which were inaccurate like 1978’s school psychologist Stanford-Binet IQ test that resulted in mentally retarded. An independent test I hit the ceiling and was diagnosed as super gifted. I am very bright, I have some social quirks, its functional. I’ve gotten married, had children, held a job, drive, graduated many times from college. I’ve been diagnosed 7x as autistic, 3 were diagnosed asperger’s.

My father was diagnosed Autistic in 1950. He is a director and psychologist for a residential autistic setting. He is thrice times married. He is gifted, has a rather flat affect most of the time and is difficult to engage in conversation. He was hyperlexic, reading @ age 2. He is asperger’s and was diagnosed in 1988 when I was.

I have a son diagnosed autistic and I disagree. Autism like ADHD is a catch-all diagnoses that is over diagnosed. My son has been dx ADHD as well. Really, he’s bipolar. (my background is a psych nurse for years)

Einstein was autistic and that doesn’t fit at least 299.00 or Autistic disorder. More like Bill Gates who is asperger’s.

Engineers and mathematicians are among the highest fields of autistic people in them, some studies say 20%. (My father’s father was an engineer, his mother was a CPA so math). My mother was bipolar, her mother was a mathematician.

Here’s what we know:
Your daughter is bright
She has an incredible rote memory
conversation skills are her area of weakness
she is using some delayed echolalia

Probably she would be diagnosed as on the autistic spectrum given the above and the overdiagnoses of it.

Help? What kind of help? She doesn’t need any help. I’m fine, my father is fine, my brother (dx PDD.NOS) is fine (information tech-computers). She can talk, and the articulation will come. What you can work on with her is conversation skills. Try to get some back and forth. Playdates 1:1.

My sons all get services but they are needed. I ignore a lot of what I don’t feel fits.

Intelligence testing is inaccurate for those without enough language to complete them, and they are inaccurate before age 6. I’ve scored a 56, 147-163 (7x)

http://asplanet.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63

So here are signs of asperger’s big deal.
Aspie Adult checklist (Alyson Bradley / www.asplanet.info – Sept. 2008 / updated May 2009):
1. Over think, analyze things,2. Prefer own company, 3. Obsessional interest, 4. Like routine, 5. Like rituals, 6. Collections, 7. Sensory problems, 8. Over focus on details, 9. Perfectionist, 10. Think outside the box!, 11. Cannot understand jokes, 12. Weird laugh and/or make odd noises,13. Nervous fidget, Stim, 14. Upset by crowds, shy, 15. Face doesn’t show emotion, 16. Very honest, can seem naïve, 17. Quirky, different somehow , 18. Cannot understand point of small talk, 19. Cannot understand society unwritten rules, 20. Bullied at school, work etc., 21. Lack of friends, socializing, 22. Friends much older or younger, 23. Mumbles, speaks to self, 24. Inappropriate emotions, response, 25. Connect well with animals, 26. Computer (Mr Spock) like logic, 27. Unexplained memory lapses, 28. Irregular sleeping patterns, 29. Hopeless or expert with maps, 30. Awkward, clumsy, bad body posture….

ON the site above the AS test I score a 44/50 with a score of 32 being most likely aspergers and an average female score of 11.

ETA: Sure

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Sandy asks…

Is there a relationship between Aspergers and Dysgraphia?

Every time i look up information about Dysgrphia, there is always a link or a few sentences said on Aspergers syndrome. What is the relation between the two and why? Is it to say that anyone with Dysgrpahia also has Aspergers?

admin answers:

A quote

Other issues that aren’t classified as diagnostic criteria but when looked at as part of a whole child view could be part of Asperger’s Syndrome are handwriting issues including dysgraphia.

Tough, but good question. Hope this helps!

P.S. Dysgraphia is not always caused by Asperger’s Syndrome

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Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom – How One School is Learning About Children With Autism

Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom

As parents of children with special needs, we sometimes get caught up in the negative things such a happen at school. We at times imagine such a properties are against us and do not can identify our children and us. One class in Georgia and especially one class made a change recently when they hosted Exceptional Children’s Week. Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom

The week included a music presentation and awards day and a day in which parents came into the classroom to boon children try to feel what it is like to have a disability. The amazing thing about this week was so we thought we got expected to be working at the teaching, but in the end we learned so significantly of such kids as positively how much the school that much loved our son. As the parents of a child with autism we were invited into the class room to speak to our son’s class. In Collin’s typical classroom where he spends part of his day, the kids learned about loss of hearing, loss of sight,and autism.

The room was set up into stations and the kids rotated to spend 15 minutes with a parent at each station to learn about these disabilities. My wife and I worked the autism station. The teacher had provided an activity which included sand paper and the kids felt how rough the sand paper was and it was explained that this is what something as simple as a tag on a shirt could feel like to a child with autism. Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom

We also brought our own ideas and demonstrated with a couple activities as well. We told the children to think of something that smells really great to them (like chocolate chip cookies) and helped them to understand that to a child with autism, this could smell really awful. We rearranged sentences to make nonsense out of them and explained that sometime when you talk to a child with autism, the sentence may sound like nonsense.

We talked about how loud noises can really bother children with autism and a couple of other activities. Kindergartners are hilarious. One kid diagnosed his dog with autism because the dog hates loud noises like fire alarms and trucks. Many of the times when we would describe something, the kids would say”just like Collin does”. I could feel tears well up in my eyes a couple times but I was not sure if it was because of that overwhelming feeling I get every once in a while of”why my child?” or was it that these kids were so great. Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom

They never make fun of Collin. They think he is cool. They like that he is different and think it is great to help him with his lunch or point him in the right direction is PE. They tell their mom’s that they can’t have chocolate cake at their birthday parties because Collin can’t eat it. They really find him interesting. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom program now!

Helping Children With Autism In The Classroom is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Teaching Autistic Children – How To Teach The Autistic Child

Teaching Autistic Children

Teaching can be a challenging job amid any child, but when the child suffers based on what i read in special needs it can be even a multitude of difficult. Understanding how properties learn and the methods that work highest quality for them is key of course, but as every child learns differently so does every autistic child so this is just recently a general guideline to godsend you teach the autistic child. By being educated on what autism is and how to effectively teach the autistic child you are taking the first step in creating a more warm and welcoming world for your autistic child. Those with autism tend to learn best from visual examples.

Therefore, standing in front of the class lecturing, loses the autistic child. Verbal communication is very limited for many autistic children, as is their understanding of verbal teachings. Including diagrams, flash cards and visual representation can make it much easier for them to comprehend what you are saying. Long sentences easily confuse and lose them, so try to avoid them in your teaching methods. Teaching Autistic Children

A child with autism often has a visual fixation, by discussing with the parents what this is you may be able to incorporate this into the lessons and keep their attention better. If they are obsessed with apples, it is much easier for them to learn math is you are using apples to show how to add and subtract for example.

With a little adjustment and creative thought you can not only help you r autistic student learn better but you may find your other students taking more interest in your lessons as well. Teaching an autistic student, need not be a daunting task. With creativity and a working communication with the parents you may find easy solutions to make a learning environment for all. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Teaching Autistic Children program now!

Teaching Autistic Children is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try the program and change child’s life forever!
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Therapeutic Massage For Autistic Children

Autistic children are different. Autism can be broadly defined as a kind of brain disorder. Parents become aware that they have an autistic child when he or she is 2-3 years old. From then onwards their life becomes very challenging as they struggle to cope with their child. Most autistic children shut themselves from the world and like to remain in a cocoon of loneliness. They hate to communicate with another adult and detest being touched. They are unable to use language properly even to express their basic needs. The child is usually unable to form sentences and may repeat a few words that he has heard. Some may be dumb Most have an extremely short attention span unable to concentrate on anything for more than two minutes. The most heartbreaking fact for parents is the child’s inability to express love in the form of kisses hugs or cuddles. Many exhibit behavioral problems by displaying fits of uncontrollable rage

At times an autistic child drives parents crazy. They usually go in for various treatments both conventional and unconventional and hope that it will bring them positive results. More often than not disappointment follows. Research has shown that massage therapy often works wonders for an autistic child. There are many kinds of massage therapies available but the parent has to learn with the help of the therapist what works for their child. Though most autistic children hate to be touched many react positively to massage therapy. Parents should learn the correct massage techniques from a massage therapist. It is important that the massage is given in the right way to bring positive results. Before you begin the exercise, make the child look at your mouth and say the word massage slowly. By repeating it everyday your child will learn what to expect when you say the word. Massage in the form of long soothing strokes especially on the head, face and neck is very effective. Make a timetable and set aside a particular time each day for massage. Giving a massage before your child goes to sleep works wonders. Many parents of autistic children reported that their hitherto sleepless child experienced sound sleep for a greater period of time. Parents of autistic children who have practiced massage therapy made glowing reports of their child’s progress. The attention span of most children increased substantially helping them to focus on the task they were doing. The child no longer loathed being touched and was able to bond better with his or her parents and other children. They were calmer and experienced less behavioral problems.

Another benefit from massage that few people are aware of is that it helps to remove toxins from our connective tissue and muscles which makes our child lead a healthier life. Many autistic children have lower levels of the hormone Oxytocin which induces feelings of warmth and emotional connections in our body. According to research massage helps to release Oxytocin in our body which is so necessary for autistic children. Long soothing strokes help drive away stress and make them more relaxed which help them respond in a better way to their environment. Massage therapy makes the autistic child feel that the world is a safe place and helps them relate to it in a better way.

Author: J. White – For more information on Therapeutic Massage or to purchase a thumper mini massager visit: Back Massagers Or call: 1-800-746-1191
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Want Know About Aspergers Syndrome?

Aspergers Syndrome may be a type of autism and it will also be thought of as Asperger’s Disorder or merely Aspergers. Aspergers syndrome and Autism can be thought of as 2 elements of a larger spectrum of disorders, known as the Pervasive Developmental Disorders or Autistic Spectrum Disorders. All of these so called disorders are marked by a most popular incapability to suitably Communicate and relate to world around the diagnosed individual.

Aspergers syndrome is distinguished by seemingly peculiar actions, unusual speech patterns or conduct, and social isolation or an inability to fit it. Children and adults suffering from this disorder have trouble communicating properly with others, particularly non-verbally. They may miss or misunderstand social cues, they will not perceive which means of few words or sentences in some of the conversations, or use a difficult to understand speech pattern. They can usually repeat words or bound sounds frequently while speaking, or use strange inflection.

Clumsiness is another common sign of Aspergers. Like folks suffering from Autism, fine motor skills can be impaired. Hand to eye coordination will also be impaired, leading to further isolation, especially for children. Persons who live with Aspergers usually have a terribly specific interest that consumes all of their attention and time, which may not seem appropriate for their age or create sense to anyone else. An Aspergers child might be obsessive about the intricate details of stock market trading, though they’re unable to grasp other basic skills.

Aspergers Syndrome is usually easier to house and live with than Autism or other related disorders. There are a few things that differentiate Aspergers from high functioning Autism. People with Asperger syndrome typically have a better outlook for general integration into society. Their issues with social interaction and communication are less severe, and their verbal skills are typically over their performance skills. They are more possible to have a single consuming interest, while autistic people might or may not. Finally, there’s much less of a link between Aspergers and other neurological disorders, as there’s with Autism.

While Aspergers syndrome is sometimes noticed and diagnosed in kids, several adults may also have it but might be unaware. It was officially discovered by Dr. Asperger in 1944, however only within the past three decades has it been researched and better understood. The reason for Aspergers and Autism is not however known, and treatment remains mostly behavioural. However it is possible to teach children and adults laid low with the disorder to have better social skills and adapt to traditional life.

If you want to know what is Aspergers Syndrome, then visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com and take guidance from Dave Angel. Dave Angel is an experienced social employee and has assisted literally tons of families around the world who have children with Aspergers. He is the author of the best-selling ebook “The Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide” and has several websites for parents of children with Aspergers.
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Understand How Autistic Children Learn Before You Try To Teach

Understanding how autistic children learn is key to teaching them with the same intensity as you teach other children. This may seem like a straightforward idea, but autistic children learn so differently that understanding autism itself is a must when you teach autistic children. By becoming educated in the disorder, teachers can effectively learn to deal with autistic children and adults both in and out of the classroom, creating a more understanding world for everyone.

Autistic children are often visual thinkers. Thus teaching by speaking will not be entirely effective. Teachers should combine pictures with words for the autistic child to fully comprehend the lesson. For instance, if you are teaching about the animals of the world, you should have a flash card with the word “mouse,” say the word aloud slowly and clearly, and show the child a picture of a mouse. Perhaps even bring a live mouse in for show and tell. Nouns may be easier to teach autistic children since verbs require action and can be more difficult in illustrating.

If you are teaching autistic children words such as “sit” or “stand,” you should complete these actions when you teach the word. Also, because of the tendency to be visual, autistic children are often unable to follow long sentences. They cannot decipher the sequence and become confused. Thus, writing instructions can be very helpful when proctoring tests or quizzes.

As visual thinkers, autistic children can often fixate on a particular object or picture. If this is the case, try incorporating that object or picture into lesson plans. If the child likes planes, try using planes for visuals wherever you can in the lesson. For example, when teaching math, create word problems about planes to interest the child.

Autistic children also tend to be artistic or musical, producing highly original drawings and showing above average abilities with instruments or voice. Set aside time in the day for the arts and encourage activities that the children enjoy.

Autistic children may also have trouble writing because of the control over their hands and movement. This is frustrating for both the child and the teacher. To reduce frustration, allow the child to use a computer. If you can do this, make sure that the keyboard and monitor are close together as the child may have difficulty remembering what he or she has typed recently.

By being open to teaching an autistic child to the best of your ability, you are not only giving him or her the best opportunities in life, but you are also being a good role model to the other children in the class. Do not allow an autistic child to ruin the learning experience for others, but rather incorporate his or her oddities into your lessons as much as possible. Creating a more prejudice-free classroom is the best gift you can give this child.

We’re a resource site for those looking for autism advice or need autism tips. Visit us or check out our autism articles.
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Autistic Forms of Teaching and Tolerance

Understanding how autistic children learn is key to teaching them with the same intensity as you teach other children. This may seem like a straightforward idea, but autistic children learn so differently that understanding autism itself is a must when you teach autistic children. By becoming educated in the disorder, teachers can effectively learn to deal with autistic children and adults both in and out of the classroom, creating a more understanding world for everyone

Autistic children are often visual thinkers. Thus teaching by speaking will not be entirely effective. Teachers should combine pictures with words for the autistic child to fully comprehend the lesson. For instance, if you are teaching about the animals of the world, you should have a flash card with the word “mouse,” say the word aloud slowly and clearly, and show the child a picture of a mouse. Perhaps even bring a live mouse in for show and tell. Nouns may be easier to teach autistic children since verbs require action and can be more difficult in illustrating. If you are teaching autistic children words such as “sit” or “stand,” you should complete these actions when you teach the word. Also, because of the tendency to be visual, autistic children are often unable to follow long sentences. They cannot decipher the sequence and become confused. Thus, writing instructions can be very helpful when proctoring tests or quizzes.

As visual thinkers, autistic children can often fixate on a particular object or picture. If this is the case, try incorporating that object or picture into lesson plans. If the child likes planes, try using planes for visuals wherever you can in the lesson. For example, when teaching math, create word problems about planes to interest the child. Autistic children also tend to be artistic or musical, producing highly original drawings and showing above average abilities with instruments or voice. Set aside time in the day for the arts and encourage activities that the children enjoy.

Autistic children may also have trouble writing because of the control over their hands and movement. This is frustrating for both the child and the teacher. To reduce frustration, allow the child to use a computer. If you can do this, make sure that the keyboard and monitor are close together as the child may have difficulty remembering what he or she has typed recently.

By being open to teaching an autistic child to the best of your ability, you are not only giving him or her the best opportunities in life, but you are also being a good role model to the other children in the class. Do not allow an autistic child to ruin the learning experience for others, but rather incorporate his or her oddities into your lessons as much as possible. Creating a more prejudice-free classroom is the best gift you can give this child.

Information on autism symptoms can be found at the Autism Diagnosis site.
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