Tag Archives: Sensory Problems

Question?: Rett Syndrome Treatment

Carol asks…

Pervasive Developmental Disorder…?

What is it??? What are the causes? What does it do? How to get rid of it if you can……

THANKS !
PLEASE ANSWERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

admin answers:

Pervasive developmental disorders cause abnormal development, including social and communication development. The symptoms appear early on – by the age of 3 at least, except in one of the disorders – and last throughout the lifetime. There are five of them: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Autism, Asperger’s, and PDD-NOS are called the autism spectrum.

Symptoms of autism include difficulty socializing and communicating with others, delayed speech, lack of eye contact, difficulty interpreting nonverbal signals, intense fixations and interests, repetitive or compulsive movements, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing. The severity of these symptoms varies considerably. Asperger’s syndrome is a mild and high-functioning form of autism. The symptoms are the same except there is no speech delay. PDD-NOS is when someone has some autistic traits and significant impairment, but does not meet the diagnostic criteria for another PDD. These disorders have a genetic basis, but researchers have not yet uncovered the specifics. Some people believe environmental factors also play a role.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is when a child appears to be developing normally, then suddenly regresses sometime after the age of 3. The cause of this disorder is unknown. Rett syndrome occurrs almost exclusively in females. Infants with this disorder experience regression between 6-18 months of age. Symptoms include lack of speech, seizures, sensory problems, poor motor coordination, growth abnormalities, and repetitive movements. It is caused by a gene mutation on the X chromosome.

None of the PDDs are curable. There are many treatments available, including occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy, and certain medications.

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Question?: Autistic Definition

Ruth asks…

What are some good things to do with autistic kids?

My cuz is autistic and I ned to find done good ways to play with him. can you help me?

admin answers:

There are different forms of autism, and different levels of disability across the whole spectrum. About 40% of all people on the spectrum have intellectual disabilities as well, this is a lot higher for people with Autistic disorder but people with Asperger’s syndrome, by definition, are in the normal range. Some people have no speech, whilst others have minor idiosyncrasies (or no abnormalities). The vast majority have sensory problems, but this varies greatly as well.

You didn’t mention how old he is either, it would obviously be inappropriate to read a Teletubbies book to an intellectually normal, high functioning 15 year old.

If the individual is high functioning, then an age appropriate activity (tailored around an interest) would be fine.

If the individual is low functioning, then you could watch a favorite TV show with them. Even with low functioning individuals, there are some with no communicative abilities or ability to interact with others, if your cousin is this severe then there is little playing you would be able to do with him. With individuals with some speech, a simple, repetitive card game (such as happy families) would be good.

There is a strong possibility that he has a specific interest, reading a book about this (be it horses or lawnmowers) with him would probably be a good way of entertaining him.

Also, try going to the park. Unless he is very severe then this would be good for anyone. Every child likes going to the park and insomnia and ADHD like behaviors are very common amongst individuals on the spectrum, some exercise will help with this a lot.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Children

Sandra asks…

What type of careers are available to work with Autistic Children?

Since Autism is growing, I’ve heard the career opportunities for caring people are increasing as well. What would they be?

admin answers:

There are a number of career paths you could take if you are interested in working with children with Autism. 1. You could go into research. There are a number of studies looking at, for example, response to treatment, changes in language over time, learning style, or inheritence rate to name a few. 2. Become a special education teacher 3. Become a behavioral specialist. Children with autism are often taught with a very specific learning program called ABA, which is Applied Behavior Analysis. 4. Become a speech therapist to improve a child’s communication skills and play skills 5. Become an occupational therapsit to help the children learn better self help skills, overcome sensory problems, improve fine motor skills and increase variety of play 6. Become a psychologist to perform early diagnostic evaluations

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Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Anxiety / Stress;  GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 21 Sep 2012 – 1:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity
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One in 88 children has been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study by a University of Missouri researcher found that many children with ASD also experience anxiety, chronic gastrointestinal (GI) problems and atypical sensory responses, which are heightened reactions to light, sound or particular textures. These problems appear to be highly related and can have significant effects on children’s daily lives, including their functioning at home and in school.

Micah Mazurek, an assistant professor of health psychology and a clinical child psychologist, found in her study of 2,973 children and adolescents with ASD that nearly one-fourth also had chronic GI problems, such as constipation, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea or nausea. The results also showed that children with chronic GI problems were more likely to experience anxiety and sensory problems.

“These problems can have a very real impact on daily life. Children with anxiety may be distressed or reluctant to engage in new activities, and those with sensory problems may have trouble paying attention or participating in over-stimulating enviornments,” Mazurek said. “These children may also suffer uncomfortable GI problems that they may not be able to communicate about to adults.”

Clinicians should be aware that anxiety, GI problems and sensory sensitivity often co-occur in individuals with ASD. Effectively managing these concurrent issues may improve children’s quality of life and their responses to treatment, Mazurek said.

“Parents need to be aware that these problems may underlie some of their children’s difficulties, so if they notice any symptoms, they should talk to their doctors or therapists about treatment options,” Mazurek said. “Practitioners who work with children with ASD need to be mindful that there is a pretty high rate of these problems, so if children are treated for one issue, it may helpful to screen for these additional symptoms.”

This is the first study to examine the relationships among anxiety, GI problems and sensory over-responsivity in a large, nationally representative sample of children and adolescents with ASD. Participants in the study were enrolled in the Autism Treatment Network, a network of 17 autism centers throughout North America that are focused on best practices for medical treatment of children with ASD.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study, “Anxiety, Sensory Over-Responsivity, and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” was published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. Mazurek is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Psychology in the MU School of Health Professions and a clinical child psychologist at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Mazurek’s coauthors from the School of Health Professions include Stephen Kanne, executive director of the Thompson Center and the William and Nancy Thompson Endowed Chair in Child Health in the Department of Health Psychology; and Lee Ann Lowery, director of the MU Pediatric Occupational Therapy Clinic in the Thompson Center and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy. Several experts external to MU also contributed to the study.
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Some Important Facts Of Autism

The interaction and community skills of the person is affected life long by this disease. Comparing with other children the children with autism behave differently. Mostly the children have problem in speaking, as a result the child is not able to express his feelings in proper words.

The parent of an autistic child could understand this easily, rather than the people to know the real fact. Reality is unknown for them. So some important things that will give them a clear understanding is given here.

There are many theories which gives the possible cause of autism. Some think this is caused by the mercury which are in the vaccines given to infants. Whilst few states that it is due to parent’s age. But the more appropriate theory is that autism is because of genetic and environmental factors.

Autism is also called as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Because few are non-verbal and mentally retarded whilst few are verbal and bright. There are varied range of symptoms in different children with autism. Social communication is the main symptom seen in most of the patients. They fail to maintain good eye contact, converse properly with others, or have one’s perspective etc.

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Autism and Asperger Syndrome have some similarities. Both cases have problems which are mostly common. In Autism, child’s speech is delayed while in Asperger Syndrome the speech develops at appropriate age and time. In other words, the child with Asperger Syndrome is verbal and bright.

It is a common fact that every individual is different from another. Similarly, each autism child differs from other. Some may speak well while other may be silent. Some may be affected physically with GIT problems, sensory problems, difficulty in sleep, etc, whereas some have problem in social communication. Even if the disease is the same, the symptoms they have varies in each individual.

Yet autism remains without proper cure though the medical field has great advancement. Though there a different ways by which their skills can be improved they still cannot remain as normal children. Some treatments for autism are behavioral, biomedical, sensory, developmental or even arts-based. Depending upon the child, certain treatments will be more successful than others.

It is a common fact that autism is a life long disease. The symptoms may become mild with proper timely interventions. Without depending others, they can try to do their activities of daily living. The communication skill can also be increased.

If one gets autism, the whole family seems to be in a stressed situation. They have to withstand many adverse conditions. So at this time, the support of relatives and friends is important. By this way they can overcome this situation. By this they can be motivated to overcome this disease.
Also gather more details on autism symptoms and causes of autism.
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How Auditory Stimulation Helps an Hurts and Autistic Child

Sounds are a part of our everyday life, and so when dealing with an autistic child who has sensory problems, sound is one of the first things you should learn to control, especially in a learning environment. Sound can both be hurtful and helpful for an autistic child. Because each autistic individual is different, you must closely observe him or her to find out what types of reactions you can expect from auditory sensory stimulation.

Loud or frightening sounds may be the most difficult type of sensory stimulation in an autistic child’s life. Many of our routine daily activities include such sounds, hurting the growth process. Autistic children can not and will not learn if they are frightened. For example, parents often find that they have a difficult time toilet training their autistic children. This may be due to the scary sound of the toilet flushing; witch could be overpowering to and autistic child. Instead, try using a potty seat away from the actual toilet until they get used to the idea. Another example is loud or crunchy foods. If your autistic child is a picky eater, try to notice specifically which foods he or she blatantly refuses to eat. Sometimes, food simply sounds too loud when crunching in an autistic child’s mouth, and these loud noises can hurt his or her ears. If this is the case with your child, provide alternative soft foods instead of crunchy carrots, apples, or potato chips. Other loud sounds, such as a vacuum cleaner, may hurt your child’s ears. Try to do these activities when he or she is not in the room, or consider providing your child with earplugs that he or she can use if the world gets too loud.

Sounds can also cause fixation. Some children, for example, constantly hum and seem fixated on the sights and sounds of lawn mowers. Use this fixation to be beneficial. For example, read stories about lawn mowers or use the humming in conjunction with a song. Music is a great way in which autistic individuals can learn, because sound is a form of nonverbal communication. Teachers and parents should use this tool in learning environments. The key is to make sound work for you and your child. Autism is a difficult disorder to handle, so by being sensitive to your child’s specific needs, you can help him or her learn to deal with the sounds of everyday life.

To read about early signs of autism and mild autism, visit Autism Diagnosis.
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Find Out The Difference Between Autism And Asperger’s Syndrome

Copyright (c) 2009 Bonita Darula

Although many experts disagree about a precise definition, the difference between autism and Asperger’s syndrome seems to be a matter of severity and is tied to communication issues. Autism is known as a “spectrum” illness, as it has a wide variety of symptoms and associated conditions, the most common elements involve poor or impaired social skills, a very narrow interest range and sensory problems.

Autistic patients exhibit very rigid behavior with limited imagination. Autism is also characterized by limited verbal and non-verbal communication skills and difficulty in understanding or comprehending typical social relationships. When faced with social interaction, for example, they may appear to be indifferent or will implement repetitive functions or comments as a response mechanism. Their listening skills are usually poor.

Asperger’s syndrome is basically a less severe form of autism. While the characteristics of the base illness remain, individuals with Asperger’s syndrome seem to be relatively good at expressing themselves, can have average or above-average IQ and will not always experience or display learning difficulties. As a result, it is often not possible to diagnose the syndrome until after the child is at least five years old. You may notice subtle signs, however, such as the tantrums daily routine, which is often a way for the Asperger’s child to exhibit serious frustration and can be far more noticeable and severe than if it were exhibited by a healthy child.

Whereas children with autism suffer from intense communication difficulties, those with Asperger’s syndrome are much better at speaking, but will find it difficult to skillfully exhibit their abilities in a social situation, play and physical activity.

Some experts define Asperger’s syndrome as simply autism with a functioning language, whilst others believe that they are two distinct issues. Autism, they say, is a left brain illness, whilst Aspergers is an affliction of the right brain. It may be possible to help differentiate between the two by observing early communication skills. For example, monitor your child’s development each year and see whether he or she has the correct range of language at that age.

An Asperger child often becomes obsessed with things, and this can range from statistics to obscure or little known facts. As this obsessive behavior can sometimes take over control, it can lead to impaired development within the social arena. Many experts believe that children with autism can improve and take on the characteristics of children with Asperger’s syndrome and become virtually indistinguishable in comparison.

It is very important to conduct individual assessments and correctly diagnose your toddler, as there’s a very wide range of individual disorders within the overall spectrum. Some children might require very specialist care for extended periods of time, whilst others may successfully be integrated within a mainstream school. The debate will no doubt continue as experts try to more fully define the difference between autism and Asperger’s syndrome.

“Bonita Darula is widely renown for her insights into the prevention of autism. Her celebrated materials have helped thousands of people from around the World find a new sense of hope. If you’d like to discover the secret truth about autism in its early stages, take a few moments to look here=> http://www.autismintoawareness.com

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Aspergers Vs Autism – Find Out the Difference Between Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome

Aspergers Vs Autism

Although multiple professionals disagree around a precise definition, the difference between autism and Asperger’s syndrome appears to be a matter of severity and is tied to communication issues. Autism is renowned as a “spectrum” illness, as it has a wide variety of symptoms and associated conditions, the most rampant components involve unfavorable or impaired social skills, a very narrow interest range and sensory problems. Aspergers Vs Autism

Autistic patients exhibit very rigid behavior with limited imagination. Autism is also characterized by limited verbal and non-verbal communication skills and difficulty in understanding or comprehending typical social relationships. When faced with social interaction, for example, they may appear to be indifferent or will implement repetitive functions or comments as a response mechanism. Their listening skills are usually poor. Asperger’s syndrome is basically a less severe form of autism.

While the characteristics of the base illness remain, individuals with Asperger’s syndrome seem to be relatively good at expressing themselves, can have average or above-average IQ and will not always experience or display learning difficulties. As a result, it is often not possible to diagnose the syndrome until after the child is at least five years old. You may notice subtle signs, however, such as the tantrums daily routine, which is often a way for the Asperger’s child to exhibit serious frustration and can be far more noticeable and severe than if it were exhibited by a healthy child. Aspergers Vs Autism

Whereas children with autism suffer from intense communication difficulties, those with Asperger’s syndrome are much better at speaking, but will find it difficult to skillfully exhibit their abilities in a social situation, play and physical activity. Some experts define Asperger’s syndrome as simply autism with a functioning language, whilst others believe that they are two distinct issues. Aspergers Vs Autism

Autism, they say, is a left brain illness, whilst Aspergers is an affliction of the right brain. It may be possible to help differentiate between the two by observing early communication skills. For example, monitor your child’s development each year and see whether he or she has the correct range of language at that age. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Aspergers Vs Autism program now!

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