Tag Archives: Schizophrenia

Young Adults With Asperger Syndrome Frequently Suffer From Depression

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Depression;  ADHD
Article Date: 07 Mar 2012 – 1:00 PST

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Given that almost 70% of young adults with Asperger syndrome have suffered from depression, it is vital that psychiatric care staff are aware of this so that patients are given the right treatment, reveals research from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Tove Lugnegård, researcher at the University of Gothenburg, has shown in her thesis that mood disorders and anxiety disorders are very common among young adults with Asperger syndrome. Around 70% of the young adults with Asperger Syndrome in the study reported at least one previous episode of depression, and up to 50 % had had repeated episodes – a remarkable result given that the mean age of the group was just 27 years.

Important to prevent depression

“The results mean that it’s important that psychiatric care staff keep an eye open for the symptoms of depression in young adults with autism spectrum disorders,” says Lugnegård. “This goes for both clinics that carry out assessments for autism spectrum disorders, and for general psychiatric care. Depression and anxiety can be more difficult to detect in people with autism spectrum because their facial expressions and body language are often not as easy to read, and because they may have diffi-culties in describing emotions. It’s also important to find out more about how to prevent depression among people with autism spectrum.”

One third also have ADHD

Supervised by professor Christopher Gillberg, the thesis also shows that around one third of people with Asperger syndrome also have ADHD, a finding that ties in with previous studies. In addition, the thesis includes some results of a major research study that compared people with Asperger syndrome with those with schizophrenia. The results show that characteristics can be similar: individuals with schizophrenia and individuals with Asperger syndrome both demonstrated high levels of autistic traits according to a self-report questionnaire. Moreover, the ability to interpret social interactions seems to be just as impaired in schizophrenia as in Asperger syndrome.

Simlilarity between Asperger and schizophrenia

In contrast, none of the 54 people with Asperger syndrome included in the study, had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and just two had had any form of psychotic disorder.

“So it would appear that people with schizophrenia and those with Asperger Syndrome are more similar to each other than previously realized, in terms of both autistic traits and social cognitive dis-ability,” says Lugnegård.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The thesis was successfully defended on Friday 3 February at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
Link to thesis: http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/28002
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posted by Dr Billy Levin on 8 Mar 2012 at 9:04 pm

not only autism but many patients with depression have undiagnosed ADHD causing their depression and do not respond to antidepressants until a stimulant is added to their treatment.

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‘Young Adults With Asperger Syndrome Frequently Suffer From Depression’

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Understanding the Notion of Borderline Autism

The concept of autism can sometimes be very confusing. The syndrome first explained by Austrian psychiatrist Leo Kanner in the 40’s has generated many controversial opinions throughout the course of history. Autism is a very complex neurological disorder that can lead to different forms of behavioral, communicational, social and cognitive impairment. People with autism rarely fit the standard symptomatic profile introduced by medical scientists in the past. In fact, the syndrome generates a very wide spectrum of symptoms that can be experienced on multiple levels and at various intensities.

In most cases, the criteria of diagnosis introduced by Rutter and other scientists may be enough to identify some categories of autistic children. However, some children may only present some characteristics of autism, showing no other signs of the disorder. Contemporary medical scientists have argued many times whether it is appropriate to consider this category of children autistic or not. Patients who partially fit the autistic profile could be referred to as “borderline”. The concept of borderline autism is very common these days and it generally includes patients who show clear signs of abnormality but they only reveal some symptoms of Kanner’s syndrome. In the past, many children with borderline autism were inappropriately diagnosed with psychosis or schizophrenia.

Patients who don’t fit the exact profile of autism but present certain signs of the syndrome might nowadays be diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. Due to their common features, Asperger’s Syndrome and Kanner’s Syndrome were considered to be the same concept. Many scientists believed that Asperger’s Syndrome described a milder form of autism, while others completely failed to distinguish between them. In fact, the syndrome discovered by Asperger described patients who didn’t fit the exact pattern of autism and hence, it could be referred to as a form of “borderline autism”. Asperger’s Syndrome revealed how difficult it was to draw the line between autistic and normal children, proving that it was possible for patients to have only certain characteristics of autism.

As Asperger’s theories became popular, many children that have been previously diagnosed with “mild” autism were now considered to suffer from Asperger’s Syndrome. Children with Asperger’s Syndrome seemed more responsive to external stimuli and presented less preoccupation to sameness. Children with Asperger’s Syndrome also seemed to have higher levels of performance intelligence and better communicational skills. Unlike autistic children, who hardly made any progress as they reached more advanced stages of development, some children diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome could be partially recovered in early childhood. With the help of specific medical treatments and with the means of appropriate educational programs, most children with Asperger’s Syndrome showed signs of improvement on both behavioral and communicational levels.

Nowadays, most patients diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome can be successfully integrated into the society and they can even live their lives independently. As adults, many patients with Asperger’s Syndrome have proved to be very responsible and socially aware, showing few signs of neurological impairment.

So, if you want to find out more about Autism, and especially about autism causes or signs of autism, please click one of the following link.
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Bordereline Autism Is Confusing

The concept of autism can sometimes be very confusing. The syndrome first explained by Austrian psychiatrist Leo Kanner in the 40’s has generated many controversial opinions throughout the course of history. Autism is a very complex neurological disorder that can lead to different forms of behavioral, communicational, social and cognitive impairment. People with autism rarely fit the standard symptomatic profile introduced by medical scientists in the past. In fact, the syndrome generates a very wide spectrum of symptoms that can be experienced on multiple levels and at various intensities.

In most cases, the criteria of diagnosis introduced by Rutter and other scientists may be enough to identify some categories of autistic children. However, some children may only present some characteristics of autism, showing no other signs of the disorder. Contemporary medical scientists have argued many times whether it is appropriate to consider this category of children autistic or not. Patients who partially fit the autistic profile could be referred to as “borderline”. The concept of borderline autism is very common these days and it generally includes patients who show clear signs of abnormality but they only reveal some symptoms of Kanner’s syndrome. In the past, many children with borderline autism were inappropriately diagnosed with psychosis or schizophrenia.

Patients who don’t fit the exact profile of autism but present certain signs of the syndrome might nowadays be diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. Due to their common features, Asperger’s Syndrome and Kanner’s Syndrome were considered to be the same concept. Many scientists believed that Asperger’s Syndrome described a milder form of autism, while others completely failed to distinguish between them. In fact, the syndrome discovered by Asperger described patients who didn’t fit the exact pattern of autism and hence, it could be referred to as a form of “borderline autism”. Asperger’s Syndrome revealed how difficult it was to draw the line between autistic and normal children, proving that it was possible for patients to have only certain characteristics of autism.  

As Asperger’s theories became popular, many children that have been previously diagnosed with “mild” autism were now considered to suffer from Asperger’s Syndrome. Children with Asperger’s Syndrome seemed more responsive to external stimuli and presented less preoccupation to sameness. Children with Asperger’s Syndrome also seemed to have higher levels of performance intelligence and better communicational skills. Unlike autistic children, who hardly made any progress as they reached more advanced stages of development, some children diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome could be partially recovered in early childhood. With the help of specific medical treatments and with the means of appropriate educational programs, most children with Asperger’s Syndrome showed signs of improvement on both behavioral and communicational levels.

Nowadays, most patients diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome can be successfully integrated into the society and they can even live their lives independently. As adults, many patients with Asperger’s Syndrome have proved to be very responsible and socially aware, showing few signs of neurological impairment.

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History Of Autism Pioneers

Autism does not have a long history, and this is due to the fact that the history of autism really didn’t begin until the first decade of the 20th century. Although, autism as a condition was around prior to this time, it was not a recognized condition and most people would have been regarded as insane. In fact, it wasn’t even until the Swiss psychiatrist, Eugene Bleuler, coined the term “autism” in the 1912 issue of the American Journal of Insanity, did the term even exist.

However, despite being the first person to use the term, Bleuler considered autism to be another form of schizophrenia in which schizophrenic’s lacked social skills with others, and were more absorbed in themselves. Bleuler’s study was the beginning of the history of autism.

Although Bleuler may have been the first to recognize one of the most common traits of autistics, there were three other pioneers of autism who really set the wheels of autism research in motion. These three doctors had a huge impact on what people believed autism was in the mid 1900’s, as well as how the disorder is recognized today.

Dr. Leo Kanner – (1894 – 1981) – Dr. Leo Kanner was an Austrian-American psychiatrist, who was one of the first to specialize in child psychology. Kanner, a doctor at Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins Hospital, is credited with recognizing autism as its own unique mental disorder. According to the history of autism, Kanner created the label early infantile autism, which he wrote about in 1943 in the journal “The Nervous Child”.

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In his report, Kanner discussed his research based on a group of eleven children who all closely displayed the following traits:

• Social interaction difficulties
• Difficulty processing and adapting to changes
• Particularly good memory
• Belated echolalia (repeating speech made by others)
• Exceedingly sensitive to sounds, and other stimulants
• Food issues
• Good intellectual potential

He used the term autism to describe the main characteristic all the children he studied displayed – little to no interest in socializing with other people.

Dr. Hans Asperger (1906-1980) – Dr. Hans Asperger, was a scientist and pediatrician. He is best known in the history of autism for defining Asperger Syndrome – a specific type of high functioning autism. The first time he defined Asperger syndrome was in 1944, when he studied 4 young boys and, like Kanner, found that each child displayed similar characteristics. He identified these characteristic behaviors as autistic psychopathy.

Although Asperger identified most of the same traits as Kanner, he didn’t note his group having delayed echolalia. Alternatively, he said that the children had clumsy movements and irregular motor skills compared to regular children, and also that they talked much like grown ups. Asperger referred to them as “little professors”.

Unfortunately, the findings of Dr. Hans Asperger regarding autism were not widely discovered until the late 1980’s even though his reports occurred much earlier in the history of autism. It is believed that there were two main reasons why Asperger did not receive the recognition he deserved until much later than his original observations. The first reason was his findings were delayed due to World War II. The second was that his work wasn’t written in English and was not translated until almost 50 years later.

Dr. Bruno Bettelhiem (1903-1990) – Bruno Bettelheim was an Austrian-American writer and child psychologist. Bettelheim developed his own theories on autism and is best known for his theory of the “refrigerator mother”. In his work “The Empty Fortress”(1967), Bettelheim wrote about three therapy sessions with children who had infantile autism. He claimed that their disorder was caused by having emotionally cold mothers. His theory was widely accepted, and for many years, parents (particularly mothers) were considered the problem behind autism.

For information on recognizing and treating autism sign up for the free Autism newsletter below.

Today, Bettelhiem’s theory has been disregarded by most. However, the characteristics described by Kanner and Asperger are still used to define the basic behavioral patterns of autistics. Nevertheless, all of these men have made a serious mark on the history of autism.
Rachel Evans. Sign up for a free newsletter about autism and discover more on the signs and symptoms of autism.
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History On Autism – Did You Know These Facts About Autism?

History On Autism

There hold kept on many conditions understood history the present hold kept on mistaken for something else, and before the human mind was understood, many with mental disabilities got placed in jail. They were believed a threat and got then massively medicated. Today, we have a greater state of affairs of how some people go through, and in the face of different out of any person else, we know there is an underlying trigger for it. History On Autism

We know do our best to aide people like the rather of persecuting them. When appearing back in the history of autism, it is easy the present while it was given a and cr in the early half of the 1900s, it was largely misunderstood by people for a extensively time. Some believe that autism was first noticed as a condition around 1911, but it wasn’t really anything other than a theory at that time. A Swiss psychiatrist by the name of Eugen Bleuler is thought to be the first to use the term. History On Autism

The word ‘autism’ meant ‘an escape from reality’ and was based on behaviors he observed in adults and it was attributed to schizophrenia. Though that was false and misleading, it was a step closer to putting a name to a condition that was largely misunderstood. New information was found from one of the earliest recorded studies of children with autism. From 1938 to the year 1943, a doctor by the name of Leo Kanner studied the behaviors of eleven autistic children. The children he chose to study were ones that seem to withdraw from interaction with others as early as age one. The type of autism that he recorded and named was what would be considered ‘classic autism’ and is often referred to as Kanner’s Syndrome. History On Autism

These children were thought to have different characteristics than those classified as mentally retarded. However, at this time it was still largely misunderstood. Some believed parents were to blame, and these children were often removed from the home and placed with others to see if they would ‘recover.’ It wasn’t until the 1960s when the disorder was finally being studied and understood for what it really is and the impacts it has on a person. History On Autism

The finger pointing at parents of autistic children reduced as understanding grew, but there was and still is in some cases a lot of misinformation about autism, and many parents feel the need to defend themselves, as if they’ve ‘done something’ to their child. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through History On Autism program now!

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Autism Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Asperger’s Syndrome

Autism Pervasive Developmental Disorder

Autism is a brain developmental disorder, one the present you may also describe as leading to the social, behavioral, and emotional development in children. Okay, autism starts in childhood, but it often performs not go away for life. If you have a loved one with autism, they are bound to have severe complicatedness in communicating and interacting in on other people.

Instead you is planning to potential see them get into the impenetrable habit of relentlessly repeating certain behaviors or actions, or having intense restrictive interests on particular things. Back when autism was first observed in the early twentieth century, it was thought to be schizophrenia or some other forms of psychosis.

This is because it shares many common symptoms with a number of other diseases, which are now believed to form the autism spectrum. Your loved one has full blown or classic autism if they exhibit the three basic classes of autism symptoms, which are social and communicative difficulties, and restrictive or repetitive behavior. However, they fall into any of the other diseases or disorders in the autism spectrum when they blend these symptoms in various other ways. They are referred to as the pervasive developmental disorders, or PDDs, and there are five of them. Autism Pervasive Developmental Disorder

One of the is the Aspeger’s Syndrome. You see, when a patient has autistic symptoms in the social aspect of their mental development and in the behavioral, but do not suffer intellectually or have communication problems, they are said to suffer from Asperger’s Syndrome after the Austrian psychiatrist who described the set of symptoms.

It is naturally difficult to tell this disorder from the classic autism or Autistic Disorder because of the proximity of their symptoms, but patients with Asperger’s usually recover from their communication symptoms early on at the onset of the disorder. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Pervasive Developmental Disorder program now!

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History Autism – Important Facts Involving the History of Autism

History Autism

Although the history of autism likely initiated well during a century ago, autism wasn’t formerly recognized as its own condition, it was originally confused provided another mental disorder, schizophrenia. For many years, it was also believed that autism was the result of one, basic cause. Today, it is known that autism does not only have one cause, and nothing about the disorder is basic. History Autism

For instance, although all autistics have issues with social development, some may be highly gifted and learn to live independently, while others are mentally unable to grasp concepts and are completely dependent. However, you may be wondering, how did the history of autism develop and where did it all begin? The following are the main facts that outline the major breakthroughs in autism history.

• 1912 – Eugene Bleuler – a Swiss psychiatrist was the first to recognize a pattern in schizophrenic individuals who seemed to be self-absorbed. Bleuler referred to this self-absorption as “autism”; he was the first to create and use this term. However, he was not the first in the history of autism to recognize autism as being a separate mental disorder from schizophrenia. History Autism

• 1943 – Leo Kanner – an Austrian-American child psychologist was the first to recognize autism as an independent mental disorder. Kanner described a group of 11 children having the following common characteristics: o Displaying anguish with changes o Problems with social interaction o Delayed echolalia (vocally repeating the sounds or words of another) o Good memory o Overly sensitive to specific stimulants, particularly sound o Problems with food o Difficulty being spontaneous o Notable intellectual potential Kanner labeled the behaviors of these 11 children as having early infantile autism.

• 1944 – Hans Asperger – an Austrian scientist and pediatrician, wrote about his experiences with a group of children he came to call autistic psychopaths. Asperger noted many of the same traits in the children that Kanner studied. However, the one trait he did not mention was the delayed echolalia. Instead, he noted that his group of children spoke like “little grown-ups”. Asperger also mentioned their clumsy motor skills that were different from the average child. If the name Asperger looks familiar, this is because he plays a major role in the history of autism in regards to Asperger Syndrome, now recognized as a specific type of high functioning autism.

• 1967 – Bruno Bettelheim – An Austrian-American child psychologist and writer wrote The Empty Fortress: Infantile autism and the birth of the self. Within his work, Bettelheim discussed three therapy session he had with children whom he called autistic. Bettelheim claimed that the autistic disorder was the result of their mother’s coldness. It was his belief that parents should not be involved in the children’s therapy. This lack of understanding of the condition left many parents wrongly feeling they were somehow to blame.

• 1970’s – Autism knowledge and research spread to Sweden. The Erica Foundation in Sweden began education and therapy for autistic children. During their research, it was discovered that autism was more complex than initially realized. This led researchers down a new path, making them realize, for one of the first time in the history of autism that there was more than one, general cause of autism.

• 1980’s – Autism research really took off and more researchers were becoming convinced that the typical reasons were related to neurological disturbances, which may be on occasion combined with other genetic factors such as chromosomal aberrations, metabolic disturbances, or illness.

For information on recognizing and treating autism sign up for the free Autism newsletter below. The history of autism still continues to this day, as researchers are still on a quest to determine the cause and the most effective treatment. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through History Autism program now!

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