Tag Archives: Respite

Question?: Treatment For Autism In Toddlers

David asks…

Where should I look for child care for 3 yr old with mild autism?

admin answers:

Check with your local infant/child care centre, GP or hospital for the relevant information on groups, help and respite for your toddler and for yourself. They should also have current information on the latest treatments and ideas to help you with the day to day care of your child and their individual needs, including child care options. I hope this helps. Good luck!

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Michael asks…

How can I help my child with Asperger’s Syndrome?

It is an Autism Spectrum Mental disability. He has obsessive tentendcies and zero social skills. How can I help him lead a normal life?

admin answers:

I have two kis with pdd (part of the autistic spectrum)and both are developmentally delayed .i make sure i have them checked regularly with mental health if he is on medicine keep that up .i have my kids in a life skills class room (they also teach academic )mainly because they can not function and learn in any other type of class room.we have an intermediate unit that helps them with their iep and er .there is also another place that helps with wrap around.does he have any tss workers or behavior specialists they are good to have for them.they can help if he has trouble focusing on tasks.behavior specailists can help with bad behaviors or ones that interfere with normal routine.you can contact your mental health professionals and ask them about programs that are in your area that deals with autism and autism spectrum disorders.good luck with you and your son

in an autistic classroom or a life skills classroom they do work with academics but they also work with socialization they help teach them appropriate places and times for things but also help them when they are out in the community.tss or mobile therapy can also help teach socail skills like eye contact ,personal space (my kids are having big trouble with this one ),indoor outdoor behavior ,manners and all kinds of socail behaviors that we dont realise we even do cuz we picked up on the cues but since they are pdd or aspergers ,autistic spectrum disorders they do not pick up on them.it can be very frustrating having a child with this diagnosis (i have 2 like i said with pdd) they also have places where you can get respite sitters so you can have someone to care for him so you can get out for a lil bit.i am not familair with your area .in mine we can use a casemanager through a mh /mr specailist place and we can have them placed through an intermediate unit.you can try places online to see where you can get help there is nami. If you can type in aspergers in your search engine and all kinds of places will come up and you can choose from there what one is more suited to your sons needs. I wish you luck i know it can get frustrating whemn you have to fight for everything that would come naturally for other kids.but with the right kind of treatment plan in effect and your patience and love there is no reason why he cant have a somewhat normal life there is know perfect just remember that and go by what is best for him and what is doing good in his way dont compare to others (this is what i tell myself all the time with my kids ). I know it is hard on him and you and the rest of the family .if you can get into a support group do that . Good luck

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Question?: What Is Autism For Kids

Sharon asks…

3 year old autistic boy throwing with a throwing problem?

I work as a respite agent and i work with a 3 year old autistic boy who has recentely formed a throwing habbit. He gets very aggressive over little things and throws whatever he can find at your head even mom is scratching her head. Are there any moms with autism kids who can give us some tips?

admin answers:

I would say he’s frustrated, and you need to figure out why, and remove the frustration.

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Autism FAQ: Where can I find trained helpers?

I will never forget trying to get babysitter/ helper types for my three sons when they were young. “My oldest has autism,” I would say, “that means… he has a hard time communicating and his, uh, behavior can be challenging, so I’ll pay you extra. The other two boys are easy.”

When we eventually found helpers we thought could manage Matthew’s peculiarities, we didn’t know for sure how things were going until we got home.

What I really could have used back then was The Collaborative Autism Training and Support Program (CATS). The program, a partnership between Sonoma State University and California Parenting Institute, offers loving support to children, much- needed respite and resources to families, and prepares university students to be effective autism service providers.

With the CATS program:

• A Sonoma State University student, one who is actually training work with kids like yours for a career, works one-on-one with your child 3-4 hours/week in your home for 10-12 weeks per semester.
• Parents have the opportunity to  participate in online  AND in person Parent Support Groups, parent networking groups and plus up-to-date autism information and resources.
• Families have access to English and native Spanish-speaking CATS personnel for information, advocacy and support.
• Contact information is available for a pool of students available for additional paid respite work.

To learn more about this program CLICK HERE.

Autism Training Programs are also available at the following colleges. You can ask them if they have a pool of students anxious to work with your child as well:

Dominican University of California

UC Davis

San Francisco State

More programs are listed on the Marin Autism Collaborative Website HERE.

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COMING NEXT–

!!!EASTER SEALS IS HIRING–IN A BIG WAY!!! I’ll tell you why, and who should apply.

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Got  questions? Need resources? Email me here citybights@sfgate.com and I will do my very best to help. I’m also a really good speaker if you need one.

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FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK and TWITTER and read the first three chapters of A REGULAR GUY:GROWING UP WITH AUTISM HERE.

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