Tag Archives: Regard

Question?: Treatment For Autism In Toddlers

Ruth asks…

Is it normal for my little boy to not be able to say around 4 words at fifteen months of age?

my baby is fifteen months and he can only say 4 words, none of which are clear. Is that normal or should I take him to see a speech therapist? I was worried that he could be showing signs of autism because he bangs his head, all the time for no reason since he was around a month old. I also noticed he was sensitive to light and sound. He hates loud noises, I know I probably seem overly concerned or paranoid but I wanted to know your opinions should I get him tested for one or both? Or should I just leave it alone for now, and wait it out ?

admin answers:

It is normal for a baby that age not to say much. Some toddlers don’t say much at all until they’re close to two; and then, all of a sudden, they just talk as if they’ve always been talking.

With regard to the other things, though, if you’re concerned you ought to talk to his doctor. He may be fine, but a doctor can tell you that. If, on the other hand, he isn’t completely fine the earlier he is diagnosed and begins to get treatment (if he did have Autism), the more likely he can be helped (maybe to the point of being ok).

I’ve always heard that babies with Autism usually don’t show signs as early as a month old, so that’s something to keep in mind if you talk to his doctor.

Really, though, since you have seen a few things that are making you concerned why not just ask the doctor about those things and take it from there. Again, if he does have a problem it won’t help him if you wait it out. If he doesn’t have a problem, then you’ll be reassured by getting him checked out.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Lisa asks…

Where can I find information on the results of harmful routine changes in children with autism?

My son has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. I’m attempting a stepparent adoption and trying to terminate his bio father’s rights. He has not seen him for almost a year. His father is bipolar and refusing to take meds. I want to show the court how harmful it can be for him to just pop in and out of my son’s life, but I can’t find anything to use.

admin answers:

I would suggest you find a developmental pediatrician to help you.

My son has PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorder) one of the many types of ASD’s (Autism Spectrum Disorder). Any type of change, large or small, in his routine greatly affects his behaviour and ability to function day to day.

A developmental pediatrician usually specializes in children with these types of disorders and would hopefully be able to prepare some type of report for you with regard to your son, his ASD and the effects his absent father has on the situation, that you in turn could present to the court. Definitely get a “professional” on your side.

I’m hoping this will help. Having an “ASD child” myself, I understand what you’re going through and I wish you lots of luck!

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lo hicimos

~

OK, friends. Here’s the deal. I have a LOT to tell you about this whole half marathon ordeal. Like a lot. Like enough that I could probably stop writing about anything else and just talk about this until the end of the year. But don’t worry; I won’t. We’ll leave the running talk to Luau. Well, soon.

You see, this running thing – it really is a metaphor for our journey. And running without any training or preparation whatsoever, having no idea what to expect and making it up as you go along? Well, yeah, that’s kind of a metaphor for the journey too. And running at a pace so radically different from the crowd that you can’t help but realize that your journey looks really, really different from theirs? Yup, that too. And defiantly eschewing the embarrassment of standing out (in this case because you’re so far behind everyone else that you’re actually running in the opposite direction)? Uh huh. And realizing that even though we’re all running our own race, we’re in it together – even when we are so far ahead or so far behind the crowd that we THINK we are alone? Yup.

And cheering for each other, crying with each other, stopping to check in with friends who are struggling? Uh huh. And carrying each other’s children – like the Caped Crusader who pulled me aside at the starting line to show me MY baby’s name on her cape (and who therefore had me crying before the race even started)? Yeah, like that.

And waiting at the finish line for an hour after everyone else comes in and celebrating the victory of finishing without regard to how long it might have taken to get there? Yup. And realizing that meeting the mile markers on time isn’t what matters? Yeah, that.

Or thinking while watching the ‘real’ runners power through their races that they’re missing the ocean and the butterflies and the funny banter with the volunteers? That maybe, just maybe, as slow and plodding and difficult as your journey is, the very fact that it’s NOT a race might just make it richer? Yup.

And being part of a community – the Autism Community, the Running Community, the Human Community? Well, that too.

Or being pulled in by friends who have long finished their races and have come back for you – come back for you! – friends who you never would have known were it not for autism, for this community? And swallowing your pride, being OK with needing their love and support to get you over the line? Yeah, definitely that.

I could tell stories for days. About the water stations and the cops. About how after a while I was so far behind that there was literally no one in sight ahead of me so I asked each and every one of them if I was winning.

About the guy walking ahead of me who I actually caught at the first turnaround when he started to drag. The guy who I tapped on the shoulder and to whom I said, “Excuse me, I know you don’t know this, but well, we’re actually in this together.” And how he looked at me really strangely and I figured I had nothing to lose so I carried on, “You see, your job is to stay ahead of me. And my job is to try to catch you. So you’re going to need to get moving.” And how he smiled and shrugged and took off. And how it made me think of all of us. And how sometimes we feel really, really alone on this journey, but how there’s ALWAYS someone behind us (except when we are actually dead last on the race course, but ya know, in life) and how it’s our job to keep putting one foot in front of the other, not just for us, but for them. Because even though we don’t always see it, we are forging a path. About how he eventually got so far ahead of me that I couldn’t see him anymore and I really questioned my judgement in pushing him along.

About the EMS guys. The ones who escorted me in for the last mile or so, not because they thought I might pass out (but only because I didn’t tell them that really, I might pass out) but because I was last so they had to follow me in before they could call it a day (along with the cops, the sweeper truck and my friends, we were quite a sight.) About how the one guy, when the finish line was finally in sight thought he was a comedian and said, “Don’t worry, only about two and a half more miles to go,” and how I turned around and said, “With all due respect, I really, really, REALLY appreciate everything you guys have done today, but @#$& you,” and how it turned out that he was the boss so no one ever talks to him like that and well, it was pretty damned funny and one of them swerved so hard laughing that I thought he might dump his bike and how the laughter was healing and energizing and so desperately needed.

About my friend Judith. About how she passed me (going in the other direction) somewhere around mile eight for me and mile ten for her and how she ran across the road and hugged me and how when she realized I was struggling (ok, crying, whatever) she asked me if I wanted her to stay with me. “I will,” she said. About how I know that she really would have. About how I sent her packing, but Jesus, who does that?

About all of my friends. Holy hell, my friends. I’m not going to try to list them because I’m tired and I’ll forget someone and then I’ll feel awful all day, so I’m just going to say this to my friends –  I love you. I hope to God I give you a quarter of what you give me.

And my husband. My hero. Who ran well over twenty miles yesterday in a thirteen mile race. Who finished but refused to cross the finish line until all of us had. Who ran the last half mile of the course again and again and again – with anyone he knew or with anyone wearing a Team Up for Autism Speaks jersey. Who ran them all in. Until he got a text from his wife that said, “I’m struggling.”

Who responded immediately with, “I’m coming to you. Where are you?” And who came. Who ran like the wind after running God knows how many miles already. Who, when he found me shuffling just past mile eleven and the cop who didn’t think I was funny said, “I’m here. We got this. YOU got this,” and who brought me in step by pained step. Who infuriatingly still looked like he could run the whole thing again. And who could have.

About my husband who is my hero.

So yeah, I could write for days. But I won’t. Instead, I’ll post my own version of a race recap. Ready? Here goes ..

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As ready as I’ll ever be

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With my friends Jersey and Sassy who are actual runners – pretending to be one of them. Sing with me, “One of these things is not like the others ..”

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Trying to stay under 16 minutes a mile. Trying.

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Sucking at math comes in handy sometimes. (I thought I was under 16 minute miles. Um, no.)

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Incidentally, I have no idea why the mile markers all said, “Normal” under them. I can assure you, there was nothing ‘Normal” about any of those miles.

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(No, they hadn’t actually turned off the timers. This one must just not have been working. I was apparently feeling a little defeatist at this point in the race.)

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Psst .. you know it’s bad when there’s no wise ass commentary. Not a good sign. 

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At this mile marker, I may or may not have tried, unsuccessfully, to find sympathy from a state cop. I was desperate. I tried for a laugh. He was unimpressed. Can’t win em all I guess, even when you’re losing. 

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At least he had a sense of humor. That’s right, Statey. I’m lookin’ at you.

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That might be the dorkiest picture in the history of the world, but damn, I was lovin me some blue haired guy at that point.

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Seriously, I know you can’t tell from the picture, but I scared the crap out of him when I screamed, “DO NOT MOVE THAT SIGN PLEASE!” I did say please. 

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She was soon joined by about six others. And three police cars. And the sweeper van.

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The fact that 2,180 of you took the time to ‘like’ this picture is mind-blowing to me. However, every single one of you was out there with me. So thank you. 

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And there you have it, my friends. The story of Jess’s half marathon.

Just one note: If anyone asks me today when I’m doing this again, I *will* find the strength in this aching body to kick em. Hard.

Thank you all for your love and support. I never would have stayed off that damned sweeper without it.

View the original article here

Loving Someone with Asperger�s Syndrome

Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome
Posted on Wednesday, April 11 @ 15:52:58 EDT by WrongPlanet Tips Loving Someone with Asperger?s SyndromeThe following article is written by Cindy Ariel (PhD), author of Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome.

I wrote Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome for several compelling reasons. Over the years I?ve had the opportunity to work with many people with AS and their partners either as individuals or couples and I have seen the struggles from both sides.

As I looked around for guidance, in the form of books and/or research to help me to help them, I found a serious dearth of information focused on these couples. Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short.

Read about Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome


I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. It can be very difficult to understand the roles and responsibilities of both partners when it often appears that only one is to blame. Taking a serious hard look at ourselves in relation to another can be exceedingly difficult, but I attempt to help couples gain balance and move closer to each other in this regard.

While it?s true that having Asperger?s syndrome versus not having it result in two people with different ways of thinking and even of being, we do not have to be at such intense odds with each other. Both partners in any couple need to feel heard and both need to listen to the other with an open heart, if not an open mind.

If we listen to each other with our hearts, and use our heads to make important decisions we should be able to come up with a loving relationship that feels mutually satisfying and leads to a happy union. Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome: Understanding and Connecting with Your Partner was written to help partners in which one person has AS and one doesn?t along their journey to a fulfilling life together.

You can order Loving Someone with Asperger’s Syndrome on Amazon.

Editorial disclosure: While this column is not sponsored or paid for in any way, a separate ad for this book has been placed on Wrong Planet by the author.
               
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why do you write this book with an assumption about a negative aspect within a relationship or one where 2 people are in conflict as if they have to “get over” something to be a good couple?
I like this approach: Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short. I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. I guess the book is targeted at people who are indeed facing problems in their relationship. If it wasn’t about conflicts within the relationship, it would have been a different book. The only thing that may be a bit unfortunate in my opinion, is the title: “Loving someone with Asperger’s syndrome”, because that title is written from the perspective of the non-autistic partner, and it may seem that it’s not aimed at the autistic partner. While the piece I quoted above in italics claims that the book tries to go against that clich?.
Sorry, I failed to integrate italics and paragraphs into my previous post. Not sure why it didn’t work, as the preview showed exactly how I intended it to be.
Re: Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome (Score: 1)
by TommyTomorrow Friday, April 27 @ 14:03:40 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Both myself and my fiancee have AS. Anyone know if this book would be useful?
Re: Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome (Score: 1)
by anotherjared Sunday, May 13 @ 17:51:06 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) It’s a nice sentiment, I have to re-iterate an earlier comment about how to support a couple where both are aspie’s. I’d much rather see Cindy Ariel (PhD) actively contributing to wrongplanet.net for the community of wrongplanet.net and not using the site to advertise her book… I’m not here to see sales pitches, I’m here for actual advice and discussion. Just me though.

View the original article here

Loving Someone with Asperger�s Syndrome

Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome
Posted on Wednesday, April 11 @ 15:52:58 EDT by WrongPlanet Tips Loving Someone with Asperger?s SyndromeThe following article is written by Cindy Ariel (PhD), author of Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome.

I wrote Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome for several compelling reasons. Over the years I?ve had the opportunity to work with many people with AS and their partners either as individuals or couples and I have seen the struggles from both sides.

As I looked around for guidance, in the form of books and/or research to help me to help them, I found a serious dearth of information focused on these couples. Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short.

Read about Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome


I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. It can be very difficult to understand the roles and responsibilities of both partners when it often appears that only one is to blame. Taking a serious hard look at ourselves in relation to another can be exceedingly difficult, but I attempt to help couples gain balance and move closer to each other in this regard.

While it?s true that having Asperger?s syndrome versus not having it result in two people with different ways of thinking and even of being, we do not have to be at such intense odds with each other. Both partners in any couple need to feel heard and both need to listen to the other with an open heart, if not an open mind.

If we listen to each other with our hearts, and use our heads to make important decisions we should be able to come up with a loving relationship that feels mutually satisfying and leads to a happy union. Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome: Understanding and Connecting with Your Partner was written to help partners in which one person has AS and one doesn?t along their journey to a fulfilling life together.

You can order Loving Someone with Asperger’s Syndrome on Amazon.

Editorial disclosure: While this column is not sponsored or paid for in any way, a separate ad for this book has been placed on Wrong Planet by the author.
               
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren’t responsible for their content.
No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register

why do you write this book with an assumption about a negative aspect within a relationship or one where 2 people are in conflict as if they have to “get over” something to be a good couple?
I like this approach: Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short. I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. I guess the book is targeted at people who are indeed facing problems in their relationship. If it wasn’t about conflicts within the relationship, it would have been a different book. The only thing that may be a bit unfortunate in my opinion, is the title: “Loving someone with Asperger’s syndrome”, because that title is written from the perspective of the non-autistic partner, and it may seem that it’s not aimed at the autistic partner. While the piece I quoted above in italics claims that the book tries to go against that clich?.
Sorry, I failed to integrate italics and paragraphs into my previous post. Not sure why it didn’t work, as the preview showed exactly how I intended it to be.

View the original article here

What Is Autism? Explore Different Types of Autism

What is Autism?

Often we come to know an individual (children or adults) who find it difficult to communicate or build relationships. Without knowing the actual reason and being so judgmental, we consider them rude or introvert. But that might not be the case with few individuals as it can also be a disorder commonly known as Autism.

Autism is a disorder where one, especially a child, finds it difficult to learn and develop the basic skills. More often than not the problems associated with Autism results in social communication. Their behavior appears restrictive and it is one of the severe outcomes of blockage of information processing in mind. Though there has been tremendous research regarding real cause of autism, but no big success has been achieved in this regard. It is believed that in maximum cases autism starts appearing within first three years in a child. Bear in mind it is a neurological complexity which results in malfunctioning of brain. It ultimately results in incapability to communicate and make relationships.

Different Types of Autism

Though both girls and boys can develop this disorder at any time, but it has been seen that boys have more chances of developing it than girls. As far as the question how common is the problem of autism than the answer is, approximately 10-20 people develop this habit among 10,000. Have a glance at the sub types of autism. These are based on severity of the situations and also the age factor.

Classic Autism is considered as the most dangerous types of this order. People suffering with this problem are those who find it difficult even to talk and their social communication is one the lowest side. They are extremely sensitive regarding few certain smells, sounds and signs. Their behavior may become repetitive about few TV shows or food items.

Few patients do have the same problem but language is not a barrier for them, fall under the category of Asperger’s Syndrome. Others may find their behavior unusual as its patients are odd, when it comes to following the social rules.

In few cases it has been seen that a child was completely normal till 2 years of age and then suddenly he/she start behaving abnormally. It is called as “childhood disintegrative disorder” and children start showing some unacceptable signs such as problem dealing with potty rules or playing.

Rett Syndrome is another type of childhood developmental disorder which is seen in girls in early age. This common syndrome stops physical and mental development of a girl child. There are four main stages of Rett Syndrome and its severity differs from child to child.

More details can be found on “Autism Spectrum Disorders”.

View the original article here

Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders – Detecting Autistic Spectrum Disorders in an Early Stage is of Great Importance

Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

It was not until the mid 20th century that the world became aware that autistic spectrum disorders existed. In 1943, Dr. Leo Kanner started up to news story a group that included 11 children and labeled the disorder that affected them as making how we know today as autism. At the same time, Dr. Hans Asperger, a German scientist, was describing a milder disorder within the same spectrum celebrated as Asperger syndrome. Today, we know it to be one of five developmental disorders that are often referred to as the autism spectrum disorders. Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

Each illness in the autism spectrum will vary in degrees, with regard to an individual’s impairment. The impairments include problems with communication skills, the inability to socially interact with others and behavior patterns that are both restrictive and repetitive. The parents of a child are normally the first to notice the signs of an autistic spectrum disorder. These disorders can actually rear their heads before the child is even three years of age. Children who have autism spectrum disorders do not act like other children. They may be withdrawn socially and may stare off into space and not respond when their name is called.

However, there are instances of the disorder not showing up until later, such as when a child, who once acted as a normal toddler, suddenly begins to show signs. Disorders may range from the milder form in the autism spectrum, normally referred to as Asperger syndrome, to a more severe form known as an autistic disorder. There is also high functioning autism, which shows symptoms very close to Asperger syndrome. If a child seems to have symptoms of autism, either the mild or the more sever form, yet does not fall under a certain criteria for one of these disorders, then they are normally diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder. Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

While it may not be a concern if a child is showing signs of delayed development, they should be evaluated by a doctor. It is important to let your physician know if you see any developmental delays in your child. If they do indeed have one of the disorders within the autistic spectrum, then there are steps that can be taken to help the child increase their development and also help the family to deal with the disorder.

Even after an autism spectrum disorder is found, individuals can, in many cases learn to be functioning individuals; however, if the disorder is disregarded and nothing is done, then there is a possibility of severe delays in both communication and social skills. It is always important when any developmental delays seem apparent that the child’s physician be consulted. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders program now!

Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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