Tag Archives: Quizzes

Question?: Asperger Syndrome Quiz

Nancy asks…

What is it like having an autistic / asperger’s syndrome student in your class?

admin answers:

My mother works with autistic kids at an elementary school, and she says the three biggest issues are disruptions, accomodations, and acceptance. An autistic student may inadvertantly do or say things that are socially inappropriate, like taking another person’s toy without asking. The teacher may need to devote more attention to this student, which means less attention to other students. If the student receives accomodations, like having an education assistant in the classroom, this would draw attention to his differences. The other students may be jealous that the autistic student gets extra time on quizzes, or leaves the classroom sometimes to go to his social skills group, or whatever the case may be. And of course, some of the other students will not accept their autistic classmate as part of the class unit. They might exclude, tease, or bully him. Having an autistic kid in the class can be a very good thing, though. It exposes the students to different types of people, and teaches them about diversity, patience, and tolerance.

Each autistic person is different, though. The student’s personality and level of functioning affect what he or she is like in the classroom. I have Asperger’s, and I was always very well-behaved in class and polite to my classmates. My Asperger’s had little to no effect on my classmates; most of them probably never guessed I had a disorder. I’ve had classes with other people on the spectrum, though. Some kept to themselves and rarely said anything, some were disruptive and constantly in trouble, and some seemed a bit odd but mostly got along fine.

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Question?: Adhd Medications

Susan asks…

Is there a better adhd medication than vyvance?

I know a lot about adhd medication and have taken many different medications trying to find the right one to ease my adhd a little with out having an overwhelming amount of side effects. I am currently taking vyvance and it works great for school work, tests and quizzes but outside of school i dred being on the medication. Is there any adhd medication that works as well as vyvance in aspects of school work?

admin answers:

I have major depression and anxiety and I attend a weekly support group for people with depression, bipolar disorder, ADHD, etc. One of the first things I learned is that a medication that works wonders for one person might not be helpful at all for someone else.

The brain is the most complex organ in the body, and it is still trial and error for doctors to figure out what medications work the best for an individual. I have lost count of all the psych meds and combinations of meds I have tried for my problems.

People on YA can make guesses on which meds might work best for you. However, the sad truth is that you will probably have to experiment with different meds to find out what works the best. This can be be VERY frustrating. I know this from my own experience.

Below is a list of the most common ADHD meds. Maybe something in the list will give you some idea. Otherwise, you can try googling “ADHD medications” or “ADHD medication lists” and do some research. It would be nice if the doctors did all the research and knew all the answers, but unfortunately it doesn’t work that way, at least not at this time.

Http://adhd.emedtv.com/adhd/adhd-medications-p2.html

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Understand How Autistic Children Learn Before You Try To Teach

Understanding how autistic children learn is key to teaching them with the same intensity as you teach other children. This may seem like a straightforward idea, but autistic children learn so differently that understanding autism itself is a must when you teach autistic children. By becoming educated in the disorder, teachers can effectively learn to deal with autistic children and adults both in and out of the classroom, creating a more understanding world for everyone.

Autistic children are often visual thinkers. Thus teaching by speaking will not be entirely effective. Teachers should combine pictures with words for the autistic child to fully comprehend the lesson. For instance, if you are teaching about the animals of the world, you should have a flash card with the word “mouse,” say the word aloud slowly and clearly, and show the child a picture of a mouse. Perhaps even bring a live mouse in for show and tell. Nouns may be easier to teach autistic children since verbs require action and can be more difficult in illustrating.

If you are teaching autistic children words such as “sit” or “stand,” you should complete these actions when you teach the word. Also, because of the tendency to be visual, autistic children are often unable to follow long sentences. They cannot decipher the sequence and become confused. Thus, writing instructions can be very helpful when proctoring tests or quizzes.

As visual thinkers, autistic children can often fixate on a particular object or picture. If this is the case, try incorporating that object or picture into lesson plans. If the child likes planes, try using planes for visuals wherever you can in the lesson. For example, when teaching math, create word problems about planes to interest the child.

Autistic children also tend to be artistic or musical, producing highly original drawings and showing above average abilities with instruments or voice. Set aside time in the day for the arts and encourage activities that the children enjoy.

Autistic children may also have trouble writing because of the control over their hands and movement. This is frustrating for both the child and the teacher. To reduce frustration, allow the child to use a computer. If you can do this, make sure that the keyboard and monitor are close together as the child may have difficulty remembering what he or she has typed recently.

By being open to teaching an autistic child to the best of your ability, you are not only giving him or her the best opportunities in life, but you are also being a good role model to the other children in the class. Do not allow an autistic child to ruin the learning experience for others, but rather incorporate his or her oddities into your lessons as much as possible. Creating a more prejudice-free classroom is the best gift you can give this child.

We’re a resource site for those looking for autism advice or need autism tips. Visit us or check out our autism articles.
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Autistic Forms of Teaching and Tolerance

Understanding how autistic children learn is key to teaching them with the same intensity as you teach other children. This may seem like a straightforward idea, but autistic children learn so differently that understanding autism itself is a must when you teach autistic children. By becoming educated in the disorder, teachers can effectively learn to deal with autistic children and adults both in and out of the classroom, creating a more understanding world for everyone

Autistic children are often visual thinkers. Thus teaching by speaking will not be entirely effective. Teachers should combine pictures with words for the autistic child to fully comprehend the lesson. For instance, if you are teaching about the animals of the world, you should have a flash card with the word “mouse,” say the word aloud slowly and clearly, and show the child a picture of a mouse. Perhaps even bring a live mouse in for show and tell. Nouns may be easier to teach autistic children since verbs require action and can be more difficult in illustrating. If you are teaching autistic children words such as “sit” or “stand,” you should complete these actions when you teach the word. Also, because of the tendency to be visual, autistic children are often unable to follow long sentences. They cannot decipher the sequence and become confused. Thus, writing instructions can be very helpful when proctoring tests or quizzes.

As visual thinkers, autistic children can often fixate on a particular object or picture. If this is the case, try incorporating that object or picture into lesson plans. If the child likes planes, try using planes for visuals wherever you can in the lesson. For example, when teaching math, create word problems about planes to interest the child. Autistic children also tend to be artistic or musical, producing highly original drawings and showing above average abilities with instruments or voice. Set aside time in the day for the arts and encourage activities that the children enjoy.

Autistic children may also have trouble writing because of the control over their hands and movement. This is frustrating for both the child and the teacher. To reduce frustration, allow the child to use a computer. If you can do this, make sure that the keyboard and monitor are close together as the child may have difficulty remembering what he or she has typed recently.

By being open to teaching an autistic child to the best of your ability, you are not only giving him or her the best opportunities in life, but you are also being a good role model to the other children in the class. Do not allow an autistic child to ruin the learning experience for others, but rather incorporate his or her oddities into your lessons as much as possible. Creating a more prejudice-free classroom is the best gift you can give this child.

Information on autism symptoms can be found at the Autism Diagnosis site.
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Autistic Children – Teaching and Tolerance

Understanding how autistic children learn is key to teaching them with the same intensity as you teach other children. This may seem like a straightforward idea, but autistic children learn so differently that understanding autism itself is a must when you teach autistic children. By becoming educated in the disorder, teachers can effectively learn to deal with autistic children and adults both in and out of the classroom, creating a more understanding world for everyone

Autistic children are often visual thinkers. Thus teaching by speaking will not be entirely effective. Teachers should combine pictures with words for the autistic child to fully comprehend the lesson. For instance, if you are teaching about the animals of the world, you should have a flash card with the word mouse,say the word aloud slowly and clearly, and show the child a picture of a mouse. Perhaps even bring a live mouse in for show and tell. Nouns may be easier to teach autistic children since verbs require action and can be more difficult in illustrating. If you are teaching autistic children words such as sit or stand,you should complete these actions when you teach the word. Also, because of the tendency to be visual, autistic children are often unable to follow long sentences. They cannot decipher the sequence and become confused. Thus, writing instructions can be very helpful when proctoring tests or quizzes.

As visual thinkers, autistic children can often fixate on a particular object or picture. If this is the case, try incorporating that object or picture into lesson plans. If the child likes planes, try using planes for visuals wherever you can in the lesson. For example, when teaching math, create word problems about planes to interest the child. Autistic children also tend to be artistic or musical, producing highly original drawings and showing above average abilities with instruments or voice. Set aside time in the day for the arts and encourage activities that the children enjoy.

Autistic children may also have trouble writing because of the control over their hands and movement. This is frustrating for both the child and the teacher. To reduce frustration, allow the child to use a computer. If you can do this, make sure that the keyboard and monitor are close together as the child may have difficulty remembering what he or she has typed recently.

By being open to teaching an autistic child to the best of your ability, you are not only giving him or her the best opportunities in life, but you are also being a good role model to the other children in the class. Do not allow an autistic child to ruin the learning experience for others, but rather incorporate his or her oddities into your lessons as much as possible. Creating a more prejudice-free classroom is the best gift you can give this child.

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