Tag Archives: Premature Birth

Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

David asks…

Do children with autism have a bigger shaped head?

I am researching autism in children under 3 right now. My friend and I have been discussing my son. We believe, my son is showing signs of autism. My friend said he has autistic children in his family and those children have big heads. Like rounder in the back of the head.

Does anyone know if this is typical in autism?

admin answers:

It’s typical of autism.

Http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071208092451.htm

In fact, all children who suffer severe stress in early infancy–premature birth, caesarean birth, surgery or severe illness shortly after birth, etc– experience rapid neuronal overgrowth.

The big exception is a supposed form of autism called “Rett Syndrome” where one of the symptoms is microcephaly.
Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rett_syndrome

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Children With Autism Suffer More Severe Symptoms When Born Either Preterm Or Post-term

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pregnancy / Obstetrics
Article Date: 05 Apr 2012 – 1:00 PDT

email icon email to a friend   printer icon printer friendly   write icon opinions  

3 and a half starsnot yet rated
For children with autism, being born several weeks early or several weeks late tends to increase the severity of their symptoms, according to new research out of Michigan State University.

Additionally, autistic children who were born either preterm or post-term are more likely to self-injure themselves compared with autistic children born on time, revealed the study by Tammy Movsas of MSU’s Department of Epidemiology.

Though the study did not uncover why there is an increase in autistic symptoms, the reasons may be tied to some of the underlying causes of why a child is born preterm (prior to 37 weeks) or post-term (after 42 weeks) in the first place.

The research appears online in the Journal of Autism and Development Disorders.

Movsas, a postdoctoral epidemiology fellow in MSU’s College of Human Medicine, said the study reveals there are many different manifestations of autism spectrum disorder, a collection of developmental disorders including both autism and Asperger syndrome. It also shows the length of the mother’s pregnancy is one factor affecting the severity of the disorder.

While previous research has linked premature birth to higher rates of autism, this is one of the first studies to look at the severity of the disease among autistic children who had been born early, on time and late.

“We think about autism being caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors,” she said. “With preterm and post-term babies, there is something underlying that is altering the genetic expression of autism.

“The outside environment in which a preterm baby continues to mature is very different than the environment that the baby would have experienced in utero. This change in environment may be part of the reason why there is a difference in autistic severity in this set of infants.”

Movsas added that for post-term babies, the longer exposure to hormones while a baby is in utero, the higher chance of placental malfunction and the increased rate of C-section and instrument-assisted births may play a role.

The study also found that babies born outside of normal gestational age (40 weeks) – specifically very preterm babies – showed an increase in stereotypical autistic mannerisms.

“Normal gestation age of birth seems to mitigate the severity of autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and the types of autistic traits tend to be different depending on age at birth,” she said.

The study analyzed an online database compiled by Kennedy Krieger Institute at Johns Hopkins University of nearly 4,200 mothers – with autistic children ages 4-21 – between 2006 and 2010. It divided the data on births into four categories: very preterm (born prior to 34 weeks); preterm (34 to 37 weeks); standard (37 to 42 weeks); and post-term (born after 42 weeks)

The mothers filled out a pair of questionnaires regarding the symptoms of their autistic children, and the results revealed very preterm, preterm and post-term autistic children had significantly higher screening scores for autism spectrum disorder than autistic children born full term.

“The findings point to the fact that although autism has a strong genetic component, something about pregnancy or the perinatal period may affect how autism manifests,” said Nigel Paneth, an MSU epidemiologist who worked with Movsas on the paper. “This adds to our earlier finding that prematurity is a major risk factor for autism spectrum disorder and may help us understand if anything can be done during early life to prevent or alleviate autism spectrum disorder.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Michigan State University. “Children With Autism Suffer More Severe Symptoms When Born Either Preterm Or Post-term.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 5 Apr. 2012. Web.
10 Apr. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Children With Autism Suffer More Severe Symptoms When Born Either Preterm Or Post-term’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here