Tag Archives: Pervasive Developmental Disorder

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Robert asks…

Can someone please explain Autism to me? My son never lost his memory or language before!?

My three year old is speech and lanuguage delayed. They are testing him for Autism.

admin answers:

“What is Autism? An Overview

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome. These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.”

“Did you know…
1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism
1 in 94 boys is on the autism spectrum
67 children are diagnosed per day
A new case is diagnosed almost every 20 minutes
More children will be diagnosed with autism this year than with AIDS, diabetes & cancer combined
Autism is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the U.S.
Autism costs the nation over $90 billion per year, a figure expected to double in the next decade
Autism receives less than 5% of the research funding of many less prevalent childhood diseases
Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism
There is no medical detection or cure for autism”

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Carol asks…

Do you know something about Aspergen Syndrome?

I’m very interested in the diagnostic for children, 4-5 years.

admin answers:

What is Asperger Syndrome?

Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder. It is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one of a distinct group of neurological conditions characterized by a greater or lesser degree of impairment in language and communication skills, as well as repetitive or restrictive patterns of thought and behavior. Other ASDs include: classic autism, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS). Unlike children with autism, children with AS retain their early language skills.

The most distinguishing symptom of AS is a child’s obsessive interest in a single object or topic to the exclusion of any other. Children with AS want to know everything about their topic of interest and their conversations with others will be about little else. Their expertise, high level of vocabulary, and formal speech patterns make them seem like little professors. Other characteristics of AS include repetitive routines or rituals; peculiarities in speech and language; socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior and the inability to interact successfully with peers; problems with non-verbal communication; and clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements.

Children with AS are isolated because of their poor social skills and narrow interests. They may approach other people, but make normal conversation impossible by inappropriate or eccentric behavior, or by wanting only to talk about their singular interest. Children with AS usually have a history of developmental delays in motor skills such as pedaling a bike, catching a ball, or climbing outdoor play equipment. They are often awkward and poorly coordinated with a walk that can appear either stilted or bouncy.

Is there any treatment?

The ideal treatment for AS coordinates therapies that address the three core symptoms of the disorder: poor communication skills, obsessive or repetitive routines, and physical clumsiness. There is no single best treatment package for all children with AS, but most professionals agree that the earlier the intervention, the better.

An effective treatment program builds on the child’s interests, offers a predictable schedule, teaches tasks as a series of simple steps, actively engages the child’s attention in highly structured activities, and provides regular reinforcement of behavior. It may include social skills training, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication for co-existing conditions, and other measures.

What is the prognosis?

With effective treatment, children with AS can learn to cope with their disabilities, but they may still find social situations and personal relationships challenging. Many adults with AS are able to work successfully in mainstream jobs, although they may continue to need encouragement and moral support to maintain an independent life.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Sandy asks…

What is Autism can some one tell me?

Please explain in your own words then give me links thanks!

admin answers:

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the autism spectrum disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise autism spectrum disorder, click here.

Autism spectrum disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with autism spectrum disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Betty asks…

What are the symptoms of Aspergers Syndrome?

My friend thinks her brother has it, so what are they?

admin answers:

Since I diagnose Asperger’s, I will try to answer your question. Asperger’s Disorder is one of the five types of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). Another type of PDD is autism. Asperger’s is typically described as high functioning autism, however it is not. They are similar, yet two different types of PDD. It is true, that no two persons with Asperger’s has exactly the same behavioral set of difficulties. However, they all meet the same basic criteria. Individuals with Asperger’s typically have average intellectual skills (or close to average), they have no significant language delays, and generally, they want to socialize. However, they way they use language and socialize is often different and it causes alot of problems for them. They usually have a hard time picking up on non-verbal social cues. They have a hard time taking the perspective of others, sharing a conversation, talking on a topic preferred by someone else, and accepting that if others disagree it is just a different opinion and not wrong. They may also have some fine or gross motor weaknesses (not too noticeable) and they often have interests that are all consuming. In other words, that is all they want to talk about or they have to do that thing or collect that thing, etc. To the point that it interefers with good social functioning or other appropriate daily activities. They may also have some sensory issues with hearing, touch, visuals, etc. They also typically, have some very high areas of functioning along with those weaknesses. They can be almost savant like skill areas. If that skill area is employable, they may wind up making a lot more money than average. A lot of times these things can make places like school a very unhappy place to be. They do not undestand why the world does not understand and accept them or why they do not fit in and they can get really down on themselves and on everyone else for not being nicer to them. This link has some good articles that may be helpful http://doban-autismarticles.blogspot.com/

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Lisa asks…

What are the most common reasons a child is diagnosed with PDD-NOS instead of autism?

PDD-NOS is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (one of the Autism Spectrum Disorders but not enough criteria have been met according to the DSM for the diagnostic label of autism.) PDD-NOS is sometimes referred to as atypical autism. Someone could have mild autism or severe PDD-NOS. I know every child is different and have varying levels of symptoms. I’m mostly posing this question to parents of children with PDD-NOS and/or child psychology experts. Thank you.

admin answers:

Supposedly, you are to diagnose someone with PDD, NOS if they have some of the symptoms of autism, but not all of the required criteria. Unfortunately, professionals do differ on how they interpret the criteria, meaning one professional may diagnose a person with PDD, NOS, and another with autism. Another thing is that I noticed that some professionals feel uncomfortable diagnosing autism, but are comfortable diagnosing PDD, NOS. To diagnose PDD, NOS, there is not much criteria needed, so professionals aren’t fearful of doing it incorrectly. With autism, professionals fear they may not be diagnosing based upon the perceived professional requirements, so unless they are specifically trained in autism, professionals will usually not use this term in diagnosing. When I say specifically trained, I mean a lot of training in this area, more so than what is typically taught in school.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Steven asks…

What are the Autism disorders other than Asperger?

We hear and read a lot about Autism is a spectrum of disorders. But the only other disorder I ever hear about other than Autism is Aspergers.

What are the other disorders that make up the autism spectrum?

Thank you.

admin answers:

The autism spectrum disorders are:

– Autism Disorder (often referred to as just “autism” in daily talk)
– Asperger’s syndrome
– PDD-NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified)
– Rett syndrome (rare)
– Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (rare)

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Genetics

Nancy asks…

what is autism?

like how do you get it, what happens when you have it?
what is it?

admin answers:

Autism (sometimes called “classical autism”) is the most common condition in a group of developmental disorders known as the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Autism is characterized by impaired social interaction, problems with verbal and nonverbal communication, and unusual, repetitive, or severely limited activities and interests. Other ASDs include Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS). Experts estimate that one in 67 children will have autism. Males are four times more likely to have autism than females.

What causes autism?
Scientists aren’t certain what causes autism, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role. Researchers have identified a number of genes associated with the disorder. Studies of people with autism have found irregularities in several regions of the brain. Other studies suggest that people with autism have abnormal levels of serotonin or other neurotransmitters in the brain. These abnormalities suggest that autism could result from the disruption of normal brain development early in fetal development caused by defects in genes that control brain growth and that regulate how neurons communicate with each other. While these findings are intriguing, they are preliminary and require further study. The theory that parental practices are responsible for autism has now been disproved.

How is autism diagnosed?
Autism varies widely in its severity and symptoms and may go unrecognized, especially in mildly affected children or when it is masked by more debilitating handicaps. Doctors rely on a core group of behaviors to alert them to the possibility of a diagnosis of autism. These behaviors are:
impaired ability to make friends with peers
impaired ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
absence or impairment of imaginative and social play
stereotyped, repetitive, or unusual use of language
restricted patterns of interest that are abnormal in intensity or focus
preoccupation with certain objects or subjects
inflexible adherence to specific routines or rituals.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Nancy asks…

what is autism some1 tell me cause its my project tell me smart person?

i need help

admin answers:

Autism speaks:
Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.

Very long but it will help you with your project.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Lisa asks…

Where can I find information on the results of harmful routine changes in children with autism?

My son has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. I’m attempting a stepparent adoption and trying to terminate his bio father’s rights. He has not seen him for almost a year. His father is bipolar and refusing to take meds. I want to show the court how harmful it can be for him to just pop in and out of my son’s life, but I can’t find anything to use.

admin answers:

I would suggest you find a developmental pediatrician to help you.

My son has PDD (Pervasive Developmental Disorder) one of the many types of ASD’s (Autism Spectrum Disorder). Any type of change, large or small, in his routine greatly affects his behaviour and ability to function day to day.

A developmental pediatrician usually specializes in children with these types of disorders and would hopefully be able to prepare some type of report for you with regard to your son, his ASD and the effects his absent father has on the situation, that you in turn could present to the court. Definitely get a “professional” on your side.

I’m hoping this will help. Having an “ASD child” myself, I understand what you’re going through and I wish you lots of luck!

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Treatment

Chris asks…

Help with my parents and school teachers?

I have aspergers syndrome and i feel nervous when i speak with my parents or teachers for help. i know they are here to help me and others, but i feel nervous when i ask for anything. help, something, etc. i need some help. if anyone has a solution for helping me that will be gratefully appreciated. thank you for spending your time to help me and others out on yahoo.

admin answers:

Craniosacral Therapy (CST) is used to treat such problems by relieving stress on the central nervous system. Therapists use touch to unblock areas of the body where cerebrospinal fluid has been trapped. It can be used on its own or with complementary therapies, and must be administered by trained providers. Read on to learn more about how to use craniosacral therapy for treatment.

1. Contact a trained craniosacral therapy provider, such as a chiropractor, osteopath or physical therapist. Providers apply gentle pressure to help balance cerebrospinal fluid throughout the body, which can create a calming effect and lessen the stress. CST is the best treatment for Asperger’s Syndrome or help people with Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

2. Prepare to spend about an hour for each treatment, during which the provider will touch the neck, feet, jaws and tailbone.

3. Know what to expect. Craniosacral therapy cannot cure autism, but some parents feel that their child is more relaxed after treatment and makes more consistent eye contact. Many people feel that CST can bolster the immune system in general, improve communication skills in children, improve behavior, impulse control and concentration and improve social interaction.

Combine Craniosacral Therapy With Complementary Treatments
1. Eliminate yeast, gluten and dairy from your child’s diet. Many people believe that autism is caused by food allergies, as well as pollutants and excess metals in the body, such as mercury. Anti-fungal medications, diet modifications and the elimination of metals in the system can help the detoxification process, which can strengthen the immune system and improve health.

2. Massage for 15 minutes before bedtime. Studies have shown that massage helps children sleep better and improves concentration. Children who receive massage also have fewer behavioral problems and better social interaction.

3. Participate in music therapy. Music has a calming effect on autistic children and can improve language skills. Some autistic children are able to sing before they can speak. Music therapy also encourages social interaction and group participation.

4. Use therapeutic exercise monitored by physical therapists to build strength and improve posture, balance and motor skills.

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