Tag Archives: Pervasive Developmental Disorder

Question?: Pdd Autism

Paul asks…

What is Autism exactly-I have an autistic sister?

I would like to understand her situation better. I don’t live with her so when ever I do see her (which is like maybe once every 5 months, if that) she’s a little hard to handle. She’s very hyper. And she’s got more problems other than just autism.

But what is autism exactly? I just want to understand my baby sister more.

admin answers:

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that begins at birth or within the first two-and-a-half years of life. Most autistic children are perfectly normal in appearance, but spend their time engaged in puzzling and disturbing behaviors which are markedly different from those of typical children. Less severe cases may be diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or with Asperger’s Syndrome (these children typically have normal speech, but they have many “autistic” social and behavioral problems).

It used to be thought that autism is just a fate that you accept.The good news is that there are now a wide variety of treatment options which can be very helpful. Some treatments may lead to great improvement, and others may have little or no effect, but a good starting point would be the parent ratings of biomedical interventions, which presents the responses of over 25,000 parents in showing the effectiveness of various interventions on their own child.

ARI’s Diagnostic Checklist, Form E-2, was developed by Dr. Bernard Rimland to diagnose children with Kanner’s syndrome (which is also known as ‘classical autism’). Many parents and professionals have also used the E-2 checklist to assist in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can print out, complete the checklist, and then mail it to ARI for scoring. Our staff will analyze the responses and send you a score along with an interpretation. The checklist is available in 17 different languages. There is no charge for this service.

How Common is it? For many years autism was rare – occurring in just five children per 10,000 live births. However, since the early 1990’s, the rate of autism has increased exponentially around the world with figures as high as 60 per 10,000. Boys outnumber girls four to one. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control reported that 1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism.

What is the Outlook? Age at intervention has a direct impact on outcome–typically, the earlier a child is treated, the better the prognosis will be. In recent years there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children who can attend school in a typical classroom and live semi-independently in community settings. However, the majority of autistic persons remain impaired in their ability to communicate and socialize.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Thomas asks…

Is ASD diffrent than autism what is it?

I am male and 16 and I was wondering what a ASD is because I have it but I heard that it was separate from autism and it had its own symptoms I was wondering what ASD relay means?

admin answers:

ASD means ‘autism spectrum disorder’

the spectrum includes
autism
pdd/nos (pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified)
asperger’s
rett’s
child hood disintegrative disorder

it means that there is a wide spectrum of conditions in the autism family…
High functioning autism, moderate autism, low functioning autism…..

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

William asks…

What are the symptoms of autism in children under two?

admin answers:

Appears indifferent to surroundings
Appears content to be alone, happier to play alone
Displays lack of interest in toys
Displays lack of response to others
Does not point out objects of interest to others (called protodeclarative pointing)
Marked reduction or increase in activity level
Resists cuddling

Young children with autism usually have impaired language development. They often have difficulty expressing needs (i.e., use gestures instead of words) and may laugh, cry, or show distress for unknown reasons. Some autistic patients develop rudimentary language skills that do not serve as an effective form of communication. They may develop abnormal patterns of speech that lack intonation and expression and may repeat words or phrases repetitively (called echolalia). Some children with autism learn to read.

Autistic children do not express interest in other people and often prefer to be alone. They may resist changes in their routine, repeat actions (e.g., turn in circles, flap their arms) over and over, and engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., bite or scratch themselves, bang their head).

Other symptoms in young children include:
Avoids cuddling or touching
Frequent behavioral outbursts, tantrums
Inappropriate attachments to objects
Maintains little or no eye contact
Over- or undersensitivity to pain, no fear of danger
Sustained abnormal play
Uneven motor skills
Unresponsiveness to normal teaching methods and verbal clues (may appear to be deaf despite normal hearing)

Research has shown that autism occurs more often in first born children and males. My daughter (first born) was an incredibly easy, cuddly baby, but definitely displayed language/communication delays. Her diagnosis is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Chris asks…

Do you have or have you known someone who has Autism?

I have the disorder known as Atypical Autism. The symptoms that I notice the most in myself are that I seem to lack the ability to empathize with others and I am on the negative end of the spectrum when it comes to socializing.

If you have autism, what parts of it effect you the most…
What part of Autism do you find to be the most debilitating..

admin answers:

Atypical autism is another name for PDD-NOS or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. I have high functioning autism, and I am a sophomore in college majoring in microbiology and neurobiology. What effects me the most is reading social cues and sensory sensitivity. I can’t easily detect whether or not a person is being sincere or sarcastic and I have been taken advantage of because of that. I also have extreme sensitivity to sound. I cannot focus if someone is tapping, I process all sounds at once and cannot ignore any of it. It can lead to a meltdown occasionally. For that reason I have accommodations that allow me to take exams in quiet rooms with white noise headphones. I love pressure and use the squeeze machine invented by Temple Grandin a lot. If you haven’t tried it, you have to. It is Ecstasy to feel the squeeze and it calms me down a lot. For some reason my parents didn’t tell me about my autism until I was 16. I wish they would have done so earlier, up until then. I just assumed I was a bad person. Now I use my insight on autism to improve standards at an autistic school I work at part time

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Treatment

Carol asks…

Pervasive Developmental Disorder…?

What is it??? What are the causes? What does it do? How to get rid of it if you can……

THANKS !
PLEASE ANSWERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

admin answers:

Pervasive developmental disorders cause abnormal development, including social and communication development. The symptoms appear early on – by the age of 3 at least, except in one of the disorders – and last throughout the lifetime. There are five of them: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Autism, Asperger’s, and PDD-NOS are called the autism spectrum.

Symptoms of autism include difficulty socializing and communicating with others, delayed speech, lack of eye contact, difficulty interpreting nonverbal signals, intense fixations and interests, repetitive or compulsive movements, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing. The severity of these symptoms varies considerably. Asperger’s syndrome is a mild and high-functioning form of autism. The symptoms are the same except there is no speech delay. PDD-NOS is when someone has some autistic traits and significant impairment, but does not meet the diagnostic criteria for another PDD. These disorders have a genetic basis, but researchers have not yet uncovered the specifics. Some people believe environmental factors also play a role.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is when a child appears to be developing normally, then suddenly regresses sometime after the age of 3. The cause of this disorder is unknown. Rett syndrome occurrs almost exclusively in females. Infants with this disorder experience regression between 6-18 months of age. Symptoms include lack of speech, seizures, sensory problems, poor motor coordination, growth abnormalities, and repetitive movements. It is caused by a gene mutation on the X chromosome.

None of the PDDs are curable. There are many treatments available, including occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy, and certain medications.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Ruth asks…

What is difference betweeen these types of autism….?

Core autism and atypical autism
if you have used resources please state its for case study.
Thanks

admin answers:

A simple Google will find many sources on the web. In this way you will be able to find what you want and what fits your research. In the mean time here are a few of the many types of autism.
Autistic disorder. This is what most people think of when they hear the word “autism.” It refers to problems with social interactions, communication and imaginative play in children younger than 3 years.
Asperger’s syndrome. These children don’t have a problem with language — in fact, they tend to score in the average or above-average range on intelligence tests. But they have the same social problems and limited scope of interests as children with autistic disorder.
Pervasive developmental disorder or PDD — also known as atypical autism. This is a kind of catchall category for children who have some autistic problems but who don’t fit into other categories.
Rett’s disorder. Known to occur only in girls, Rett’s children begin to develop normally. Then they begin to lose their communication and social skills. Beginning at the age of 1 to 4 years, repetitive hand movements replace purposeful use of the hands.
Childhood disintegrative disorder. These children develop normally for at least two years, and then lose some or most of their communication and social skills.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Mandy asks…

Looking for simple explanation of PDD-NOS (Pervasive De – and things that have worked to improved the diagnose

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

admin answers:

PDD-NOS is a condition on the autism spectrum. Autism is generally defined as a disorder involving language delay, difficulties with social reciprocity and social skills, and repetitive behavior. PDD-NOS is a condition where there are signs and symptoms of autism, but not enough to make a full diagnosis. For instance, perhaps the person shows language delay and difficulty with social skills, but not repetitive behavior in the classically autistic sense. That kind of thing.
Interventions for PDD-NOS are similar to those used for autism: speech therapy, occupational therapy, behavior intervention, social skills intervention, etc. However, individuals on the autism spectrum are NOT the same – there is a huge variance in how people act and behave, even though they might have similar diagnoses. As a result, the type of interventions that might work best for one person might be different for someone else.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults

Ruth asks…

Is it common for high functioning autistic adults to live with their parents?

I have high functioning autism / aspbergers / a Pervasive Developmental Disorder. I have lived on my own and my symptoms became worse. I moved in and out with my mom – logically it seemed advantageous to both of us.

I was wondering if it’s common for autistics to be more prone to living at home – I don’t really understand it, it’s a little like a magnet.

I have trouble explaining this to others also.

admin answers:

I think that, as the other poster suggested, it has to do with routine. With your mom, you have an external schedule that determines a lot of your daily activities. If you’re on your own, you’re responsible for everything yourself. And that’s exactly something that is difficult for many autistics – all those little everyday tasks. Even if you can handle them, that’ll still demand so much of your resources that you’ll get into trouble elsewhere.
I’d suggest you check out this website: http://thiswayoflife.org/index.html There is a lot of useful information (look for Executive Dysfunction); and I guess that you can implement some strategies for yourself to get along on your own.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Donald asks…

What developmental disability do you think Boo Radley’s character from To Kill a Mockingbird has?

I am doing an assessment paper on Boo Radley from To Kill a Mockingbird. I am having a difficult time determining and narrowing his disability. I am inclined to believe that he has Pervasive Developmental Disorder NOS with a Co-morbid diagnosis of Schizoid Personality Disorder but on the other hand I am swayed by the diagnosis of either Autism or Aspergers Syndrome. I would love any and all input in regards to this!

admin answers:

I would say Schizoid Personality Disorder, not Autism or Aspergers. Boo Radley purposefully isolates himself from the rest of society, and when he appears, he is silent and detached. Autism and Aspergers usually show up with some sort of obsession. With Autism, depending on the severity, communication and attention issues. I could see how you would go there because they are disorders that cause an individual to be distanced from society. Recall that toward the end of the book, Boo Radley came out and helped Scout and Jem when Ewell attacked them. Someone with autism would not do something that spontaneous unless they were conditioned to behave that way. And people with Aspergers Syndrome usually have little interest in things outside their topic of fixation.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder In Children

Lizzie asks…

Can you have PDD-NOS and not be on the autism spectrum?

Our son has a huge line-up of testing that is scheduled to be done, but the neurologist said that he more than likely has PDD-NOS. Our speech therapist said that PDD isn’t autism, it’s just a delay, is that true? I thought they both go hand in hand.

admin answers:

In short no.

PDD-NOS is on the autism spectrum, it is NOT classic autism, but it is still an ASD- Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Long answer-

Your son might end up with a provisional diagnoses of PDD-NOS- meaning they will diagnose him with that, but then later might drop it. Its very difficult especially at a young age to properly diagnose a child if they have classic autism, or Aspbergers, or a general developmental problem. It can take years for them to know for sure what your son has- but it doesn’t change what type of help he is going to need, however for most state/school programs as well as insurance cases, they need some form of diagnoses to pay for speech/occupational therapy whatever they determine he needs. Because the treatment plan decided on will be individual to your son, it doesn’t really matter what “label” he has as long as he is getting the help he needs.

The name PDD-NOS literally means- Pervasive Developmental Disorder- Not Otherwise Specified, meaning they just don’t have enough data to decided how to specify it. While he has the diagnoses of PDD-NOS he is considered to be on the autism spectrum- however in time they may decided it was a general delay and he won’t be considered on the spectrum anymore.

Right now, my son, has just gone through a bunch of tests, and has a couple more lined up in the fall. He has PDD-NOS, but they feel he will end up being either classic autism or Asbergers, or even OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder) but right now he shows signs of all three, so they aren’t sure which he has. His neurologist describes it this way- when a plant is very small, sometimes you aren’t sure what type of flower is going to grow on it, however once it blooms it is obvious what kind of plant it was- but it doesn’t change that it is a plant. Meaning my son has something, we aren’t sure what, but it doesn’t change the fact he has something. The main concern is how do you help him get better.

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