Tag Archives: Pervasive Development Disorders

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Donald asks…

my 6 yr old was just dxd with pdd-nos we had her iep at school yesterday, but i need some advice?

need help understanding pddnos what is my child allowed to have in school? whats types of behavior are similar to other kids, need to talk to someone with a child with same issues

admin answers:

I taught a few students diagnosed with PDD-NOS and for the most part they had what is called SDD – Significant Developmental Delays. This means they may be behind in growth or hitting typical milestones in development. One of my students was very intelligent; however, he did not interact well among his peers socially. With each child, behavior varies. Here’s some more information below…

Hope this helps!

Pervasive Development Disorders (PDD)
Home > About Autism > What are Autism Spectrum Disorders? > Pervasive Development Disorders (PDD)

Defining AutismPervasive Developmental DisorderLearn the SignsRelated Disorders

Pervasive Development Disorders (PDD)
The term “PDD” is widely used by professionals to refer to children with autism and related disorders; however, there is a great deal of disagreement and confusion among professionals concerning the PDD label. Diagnosis of PDD, including autism or any other developmental disability, is based upon the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), published by the American Psychiatric Association (Washington, DC, 1994), and is the main diagnostic reference of mental health professionals in the U.S.

According to the DSM-IV, the term “PDD” is not a specific diagnosis, but an umbrella term under which the specific diagnoses are defined.

Diagnostic labels are used to indicate commonalities among individuals. The key defining symptom of autism that differentiates it from other syndromes and/or conditions is substantial impairment in social interaction (Frith, 1989). The diagnosis of autism indicates that qualitative impairments in communication, social skills, and range of interests and activities exist. As no medical tests can be performed to indicate the presence of autism or any other PDD, the diagnosis is based upon the presence or absence of specific behaviors. For example, a child may be diagnosed as having PDD-NOS if he or she has some behaviors that are seen in autism, but does not meet the full criteria for having autism. Most importantly, whether a child is diagnosed with a PDD (like autism) or a PDD-NOS, his/her treatment will be similar.

Autism is a spectrum disorder, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. As a spectrum disorder, the level of developmental delay is unique to each individual. If a diagnosis of PDD-NOS is made, rather than autism, the diagnosticians should clearly specify the behaviors present. Evaluation reports are more useful if they are specific and become more helpful for parents and professionals in later years when reevaluations are conducted.

Ideally, a multidisciplinary team of professionals should evaluate a child suspected of having autism. The team may include, but may not be limited to, a psychologist or psychiatrist, a speech pathologist and other medical professionals, including a developmental pediatrician and/or neurologist. Parents and teachers should also be included, as they have important information to share when determining a child’s diagnosis.

In the end, parents should be more concerned that their child find the appropriate educational treatment based on their needs, rather than spending too much effort to find the perfect diagnostic label. Most often, programs designed specifically for children with autism will produce greater benefits, while the use of the general PDD label can prevent children from obtaining services relative to their needs.

Behaviors:
The central features of Autistic Disorder are the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication, and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. The manifestations of this disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. Autistic Disorder is sometimes referred to as Early Infantile Autism, Childhood Autism, or Kanner’s Autism (page 66).

A. A total of six (or more) items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1), and one each from (2) and (3):

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
Marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction .
Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
A lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
Lack of social or emotional reciprocity
Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:
Delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gestures or mime)
In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
Stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level
Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
Apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
Persistent preoccupation with parts of object
B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

Social interaction
Language as used in social communication
Symbolic or imaginative play
C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett’s Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome Pictures

Mandy asks…

I need to know more about autism, my little sister who i never see?

Ok, im 16 and my little sister Lexie lives with her real mom , we both have the same dad but different moms. I havent seen her since she was like 3 or 4 and shes now 8. shes very tiny and underdeveloped, but adorable., her mom told me she has learning disabilities and mild autism, i was gonna see if she would let Lexie come stay with me for a week so i can get to know her, but i just wonder how shes like.
any info??

admin answers:

My son has PDD-NOS which is on the Autism Spectrum. The Autism Spectrum is what they call a Spectrum because the severity and symptoms that children have differs greatly. There are five diagnoses that are under the Autism Spectrum Umbrella. These are Autism, PDD-NOS, Asperger’s, childhood disintegrative disorder, and Rett syndrome. PDD-NOS is the most common diagnoses. Asperger’s is the highest functioning of the Autism Spectrum Disorders which are also called Pervasive Development Disorders. Autism is more common in boys than girls, except for Rett Syndrome which affects mostly girls. I have been told by specialists that they have a saying that “If you have seen one child with Autism you have seen one child with Autism”. By that saying they mean that no two children with autism present the same.

Let me tell you a little about my son. When he was a baby I knew something was different. He was my third child so I just knew something was not right. He did not like to be held like my other kids did. He would let me feed him, but look at the ceiling fan while I did instead of into my eyes. When he was done eating he would want to get down. He did not like to be held much. As he got older I noticed that he did not play with toys like my other kids did. He liked to take them apart instead. He was a head banger and rocked side to side alot. When routines changed he always got very irritable and still does. He would play with his toys the same way all the time, and line them up. He began talking on time, but always talked about what he was thinking without holding proper conversations. His voice is monotone all in one high pitch. He does not understand others feelings, how his actions affect others, or facial expressions. He takes everything very seriously and does not understand sarcasm or jokes. He has high anxiety, gets frustrated easily, and has been agressive since he was two. He has sensory processing disorder which is very common with PDD. He has always had sensory issues and hated things too bright, too cold or hot, certain clothing, certain textures, etc. He has problems making friends, and does not play age appropriately.

What has worked for us: My son gets Sensory Integration therapy at his school where he has an IEP and is in a special classroom. He has been in counseling since he was three to help him understand his feelings, others feelings, and ways to better control his emotions. He is on medications to help him control his rages, anger, and sleep issues. I have found that schedules and routines are the most important things for us. I made him a picture schedule that works very well. If you want to email me I can send you more information and even pics of our picture schedule. I have gotten valuable information by getting my son several diagnostic tests such as a speeech evaluation, neuropsycological evaluation, Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician Evaluation, an EEG, an EKG, and even genetics testing. I think that the two most important things to do are to see a Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician because they are the doctors that most specialize in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Also a neuropsych evaluation will help understand how she thinks and how her brain works.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Pervasive Development Disorder – Some Things About The Pervasive Development Disorders

Pervasive Development Disorder

The pervasive development disorders are a group of conditions, containing: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Rett’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified. Children in on autism have problems in communicating and relating to a larger number of people, properties have problems in the imagination and with the understanding of reality. Pervasive Development Disorder

In the majority of cases, there can seem a little degree of mental retardation. The children with Asperger’s syndrome have average or above average intelligence, they develop normally in the areas of language and cognition, but they have problems with social interaction and communication, a narrow range of interests and often have difficulty concentrating and poor coordination. Pervasive Development Disorder

]]>

The children with Rett’s syndrome have the symptoms mentioned before, but the also suffer the loss of many motor or movement skills. This condition affects usually girls, because it is linked to a defect on the X chromosome. Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare condition and children affected by it begin their development normally, but between the age of 2-10 many of the developed skills will be lost. Those affected by this illness may lose control of other functions, including bowel and bladder control. Pervasive Development Disorder

Pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified refers to children that are too social to be considered autistic, but they still have some difficulty interacting with others, communicating and playing. Children with pervasive development disorders can develop a lot of symptoms and the severity of them depends from case to case. Pervasive Development Disorder

Some general symptoms include difficulty with social interaction, understanding the reality, with verbal communication, problems using and understanding language, repetitive body movements or patterns of behavior. There can also be mentioned difficulty sleeping, aggressive behavior, and nervousness. The cause of these illnesses is not known yet, but researchers are working on it. Pervasive Development Disorder

However, there were studies that suggested that these illnesses are caused by a problem with the nervous system, and there are studies in progress that are examining the structure and function of the brain in people with autism, to find out clues that will lead to a better understanding of these illnesses. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Pervasive Development Disorder program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Pervasive Development Disorder is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
Article Source

Types Of Autism Revealed

The term “autism” is a generalized term which falls inside a larger medical category oftentimes called “the 5 Pervasive Development Disorders”. Autism is the most common type of development disorder and can appear in a range of  types and severity of condition. This has led to the term “Autism Spectrum Disorder” which can be often used to identify and discuss the differing types of autism. What this implies is that someone diagnosed as having autism will have one of several different types of autism which have features that are comparable in some respects and different in others.

Inside the Autism Spectrum Disorder there exists four subcategories of autism which are Asperger Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder and Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified or “PDD-NOS”. Seeing as each of these are types of autism they all share some general autism traits.

It is generally acknowledged that autism is related to the brain or what some are now calling “mindblindness”. At some point between birth and the first two-and-a-half years of age there’s a serious development problem inside the brain that prevents parts of the brain from functioning as one. As the child gets older they find it more and more difficult to communicate and connect to other people around them in what we deem a normal and socially acceptable manner. Dependant upon how bad the brain disorder was early on in life will determine how serious the type of autism is when the child becomes older.

What we have discussed thus far has told us that all types of autism are linked to a condition within the brain. Now we will look at how each of the types of autism are different.

1. Asperger Syndrome (AS)

indicated by impaired speech and communication skills
restrictive patterns in the manner the individual behaves and thinks

]]>

Children with Asperger Syndrome often exhibit very obsessive behavior towards a single subject or topic and refuse to focus on anything else. This makes it very difficult for them to socialize with others, especially their peer group and they find it hard to talk and interact normally. Also very common is delayed learning when it comes to motor skills like riding a bike, being able to catch a ball or even climbing on playground equipment. The child is usually thought of as being clumsy and inept.

2. Rett Syndrome

symptoms tend to be noticed earlier on in a child’s life than other types of autism
generally is encountered only in girls and unexpectedly begins to surface some six to eighteen months after a normal infant development pattern

A baby with Rett Syndrome exhibits a slow down or oftentimes even a loss of customary development skills that were already developed before Rett Syndrome. Added signs of this infant disorder may include problems learning to walk, increased delay in learning basic motor skills and often there is a lessening in skull growth rate.

3. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD)

less common type of autism
occurs later than other types of autism, not until around age 3 or four
frequently a dramatic loss of social, communication and other kinds of skills

A child afflicted with CDD generally has demonstrated normal development well beyond that phase where other types of autism may become evident. Everything appears fine, until unexpectedly around the ages of 3 or 4 the child in a short time begins to have difficulty speaking normally, doing social activities with others and begins to fall behind in normal skill development for their age group. In very severe cases this may even lead to mental retardation.

4. Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS)

generally the mildest type of autism and is usually diagnosed around 4 years old
core features are problems with social interaction and communication

A child with PDD-NOS enjoys the company of other people but has a difficult time reacting appropriately and making genuine connections with their friends. For example they find it difficult to relate to the feelings of others, and as such would not know how to appriopriately react if someone is laughing or crying. Areas of difficulty with respect to communicating with other people include a restricted vocabulary, repetitive language, narrow interests and poor nonverbal communication.

As you can see the definition of autism just isn’t so simple as many people presume it to be. Differing autism features have given rise to a number of different types of autism that will impinge on children and adults in a wide range of ways, often depending upon how severe the condition is for that person.

It is extremely important to understand that the above facts about autism, together with the types of autism discussed, are merely general guidelines and are in no way intended to be a medical diagnosis. If you believe that your son or daughter may have autism, then please seek out medical advice from a physician.

Take action now to find out more about what is autism disorder and learn to help your child and yourself as a concerned parent or an adult dealing with autism. Visit our website now to learn more about the types of autism and much more. Articles on autism, videos and links to other resources including books on autism. Let us help you as we have already helped hundreds of other concerned parents with autistic children as well as adults with autism .
Article Source

Some Things About the Pervasive Development Disorders

The pervasive development disorders are a group of conditions, containing: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Rett’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified.

Children with autism have problems in communicating and relating to other people, they have problems with the imagination and with the understanding of reality. In many cases, there can appear some degree of mental retardation.

The children with Asperger’s syndrome have average or above average intelligence, they develop normally in the areas of language and cognition, but they have problems with social interaction and communication, a narrow range of interests and often have difficulty concentrating and poor coordination.

The children with Rett’s syndrome have the symptoms mentioned before, but the also suffer the loss of many motor or movement skills. This condition affects usually girls, because it is linked to a defect on the X chromosome.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare condition and children affected by it begin their development normally, but between the age of 2-10 many of the developed skills will be lost. Those affected by this illness may lose control of other functions, including bowel and bladder control.

Pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified refers to children that are too social to be considered autistic, but they still have some difficulty interacting with others, communicating and playing.

Children with pervasive development disorders can develop a lot of symptoms and the severity of them depends from case to case. Some general symptoms include difficulty with social interaction, understanding the reality, with verbal communication, problems using and understanding language, repetitive body movements or patterns of behavior. There can also be mentioned difficulty sleeping, aggressive behavior, and nervousness.

]]>

The cause of these illnesses is not known yet, but researchers are working on it. However, there were studies that suggested that these illnesses are caused by a problem with the nervous system, and there are studies in progress that are examining the structure and function of the brain in people with autism, to find out clues that will lead to a better understanding of these illnesses.

It is known that in 10.000 births, there appear 5-15 cases of children affected by these pervasive development disorders. The most affected are the boys, excepting the situation of Rett’s syndrome, which affects mostly girls.

In order to diagnose autism, if the symptoms are present, the doctor will perform a complete medical history and physical examination. Then, he will do some tests, like X-rays and blood tests, to see if there are symptoms that can show a physical disorder. If there isn’t found a physical disorder, the child is sent to a specialist in childhood development disorders which is trained to diagnose and treat the pervasive development disorders. The doctor analyzes the child’s level of development, speech and behavior, and often can ask the parents of the child, or other adults that are familiar with him about the symptoms that they found.

Because children affected by these disorders can have a large range of symptoms, the treatment must be adjusted to fulfill every child’s needs.

Treatment can include medications in order to treat specific symptoms, like anxiety, hyperactivity and behavior that may result in injury, there are also necessary therapies that increase the child’s functional abilities, and strategies for supporting positive behavior.

The result seen in people with pervasive development disorders varies depending on the type and severity of the condition, on the age when the treatment started and on the availability of supportive resources for the child.

There are being made researches in order to find out more about these conditions, to discover what is happening in the brain and to find better ways for diagnosing and treating these disorders, or even prevention and cure.

For more information about autism causes please review http://www.autism-info-center.com/signs-of-autism.htm or even http://www.autism-info-center.com/autism-symptoms.htm
For more information about autism causes please review http://www.autism-info-center.com/signs-of-autism.htm or even http://www.autism-info-center.com/autism-symptoms.htm
Article Source

Unexplainable Autism Disease And Its Signs

The brain is an infinite labyrinth. No one-despite the surmountable efforts of history and modern day’s great men-can truly decipher or describe how it ticks and how it works. Although it is considered as a powerful tool of any man who can utilize it to its maximum potential, the brain-or the mind-is not always designed for greatness.

Due to its inexplicable ticking, sometimes, the brain itself can be destructive to a person’s life. One of the cases in which the brain causes intolerable pain to the person affected and to the individuals that surround him is the Asperger’s Disorder or the Asperger’s Syndrome.

Together with Autism, Rett’s Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), Asperger’s Syndrome is considered as one of the five Pervasive Development Disorders or PDDs.
PDDs or the set of neurologically based disorders has been identified to show a distinctive range of delays in different developmental stages of an individual.

First described in 1940 by Hans Asperger, a Viennese pediatrician, the concept of Asperger’s Syndrome stemmed from the autistic-like behaviors of boys that have normal intelligence. Since the symptoms are like those in autism, many experts considered it as a “milder form of autism.”

Although they have almost the same characteristics, Asperger’s Disorder is comparably the less severe form of autism. This severity in the symptoms is mainly highlighted by the absence of language delays because children who are suffering for the illness are slightly affected when it comes to their communication skills.  More often than not, these kids do have good language and cognitive skills.

]]>

The disorder-that is also distinguished by the same kind of abnormalities of correlative social interaction like in autism-also embodies a restricted, conventional, incessant repertoire of activities and interests. But, unlike people who suffer from Autism, the people who are suffering from Asperger’s Syndrome do not experience a delay in cognitive development or retardation in language. And unlike autism, most individuals are of normal general intelligence. But since they are suffering from a neurological disorder, they exude extreme clumsiness. Unlike autistic children that are perceived as indifferent, children with Asperger’s are more than willing to fit and mingle-only, they just do not know how. Since they are clueless on how to interact with others, they are seen as socially awkward individuals that do not have the grasp of social norms. Due to absence of empathy, these people usually may have limited eye contact, seemingly not attentive in a conversation, and do not know how to use gestures.

One of the common symptoms of a child who has an Asperger’s Syndrome is his or her unusual speech pattern. Since they have generally good language skills, it is quite noticeable how the child he or she uses language in various ways that usually lack inflection or doing it in some sort of a singsong. When it comes to inclination of interests, a child suffering from Asperger’s Syndrome tends to be obsessive on a particular subject.

Although the case of Asperger’s Syndrome is slightly mild compared to Autism and any other PDD, the threat might be a little underrated or underestimated.  Most experts agree that there is indeed a strong inclination that the abnormalities will continue up the person’s later stage of life like in adolescence and adult life. It is also possible that that as the person suffering from the disorder get older, he or she would represent individual characteristics and occasionally disturbing psychotic episodes.

Aside from the autistic-like behaviors, it can be said that the person suffering from Asperger’s Syndrome is he or show symptoms of language impairment, social impairment marked by impaired social understanding, obvious peculiarities or behavioral “oddness” or mannerisms. Other symptoms of Asperger’s Disorder are social delays with non-verbal communication problems, lack of spontaneity, clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements, limited interests and/or unusual preoccupations, repetitive routines or rituals and preoccupation in their own world with their own agenda
Read about skin whitening tips and how to lighten skin at the Facts About Skin website.
Article Source

Autistic Non Verbal – Autism or The Next Consciousness?

Autistic Non Verbal

I suffer gone over Indigo children as being an indication the current humans are evolving to the next amount of consciousness – Christ consciousness. These Crystal children often get diagnosed as ADHD. There is another state of these new kids the are making diagnosed with a supplementary complex condition. One the medical profession calls PDD or pervasive development disorders. Autistic Non Verbal

Better celebrated as autism. Autism, according to the Autism Society of America, affects approximately 1.5 million Americans and is growing at a startling rate of 10-17% a year. So why is this so prevalent now. Is it because it was misdiagnosed or is there another reason. We love to put people in a box and have a label for conditions and disorders that are outside the norm. Autistic Non Verbal

Could it be that these children are really just examples of the new humans who are merely wired differently. Do these children have the ability to see other dimensions. Possibly they communicate in a non-verbal way. Do they have the attributes of the new human that I have described in previous articles. Is there perspective on life just different. Does this “neurodiversity” make them disabled. Who gets to judge what typical is? Autistic Non Verbal

Autistics, as they are called, have been reported to be super intelligent, many having photographic memories. Even some adult autistics sometimes speak of themselves as being a superior species. I would call it an evolved species. There are lots of stories about great things being accomplished by people that have been diagnosed with autism. Maybe they are just being the bridges between the two levels of consciousness that I have described. Autistic Non Verbal

They are more entrenched in the new consciousness, making it harder for them to function in the old one. Maybe they are on a different wavelength. We label them as different or as having an disorder because they don’t behave in the typical manner. Are they simply a different way of being a human. These descriptions sound very similar to the description I have given of Indigos. They act differently because they are wired differently. Autistic Non Verbal

They have a different perspective on how life is to be lived. In duality consciousness, with our penchant for judgment, we will judge behavior like autism as “not normal” and treat the individual as such. We administer drugs like the ones given to children judged as ADHD and even lock them away from society under the premise that it is for their own good. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Non Verbal program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Non Verbal is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
Article Source