Tag Archives: Peer Interaction

Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

Susan asks…

How to cope with my daughter with asperger’s being depressed?

My daughter, Elizabeth, was diagnosed with Asperger‘s Syndrome at age 6. She is now 16 years old. She’s been depressed because all these years, she’s never actually had a social relationship with others. She really wants friends. But, I don’t know were she can develop peer interaction with others now that school is out. Any tips on her coping with depression?

admin answers:

Look to the autism support network,there are kids with aspergers there and can help support each other.Can also get advice from adults with it.Look at the books Gut and psychology Syndrome and Balance Your brain balance Your Life,and look at reviews at Amazon.

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Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings

Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Neil Humphrey

School of Education, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, neil.humphrey{at}manchester.ac.uk Wendy Symes
School of Education, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract The aim of the current study was to document the peer interaction patterns of students with autistic spectrum disorders in mainstream settings. Structured observations of a group of 38 adolescents with ASD drawn from 12 mainstream secondary schools were conducted over a two-day period and data compared with those of school, age, and gender matched comparison groups of 35 adolescents with dyslexia and 38 with no identified special educational needs (the ASD and dyslexia groups were also matched on SEN provision). Frequency and duration of peer interaction behaviours were coded. In terms of duration, multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) indicated that participants with ASD spent more time engaged in solitary behaviours, less time engaged in co-operative interaction with peers, and more time engaging in reactive aggression towards peers than either comparison group. In terms of frequency, similar patterns emerged, but additionally participants with ASD engaged in fewer instances of rough/vigorous play, and were subject to more instances of social initiation and instrumental verbal aggression by peers than either comparison group. The findings of the current study support the authors’ theoretical model of peer group interaction processes for individuals with ASD, and have implications for both social skills training and the development of peer awareness and sensitivity. Limitations are noted.

inclusive education peer interaction © The Author(s), 2011. Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print March 31, 2011, doi: 10.1177/1362361310387804 Autism July 2011 vol. 15 no. 4 397-419 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) Podcast All Versions of this Article: current version image indicatorVersion of Record – Jul 21, 2011 1362361310387804v1 – Mar 31, 2011 What’s this? References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Humphrey, N. Articles by Symes, W. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Humphrey, N. Articles by Symes, W. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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Autism Teacher Training – Is There An Oversight That Autistic Children With A General Education May Experience Setbacks?

Autism Teacher Training

While many schools try to integrate children with learning challenges into the mainstream classroom, autistic children with a general education could experience setbacks because of the environment in school. A classroom not suited to autistic behaviors and teachers or students not understanding disorder characteristics could hinder the learning ability of an autistic student. Autism Teacher Training

An inclusion school environment can be successful if teachers have experience and training in autistic education. Not having the proper training could lead to setbacks in an autistic child’s verbal and nonverbal communication development, sensory processing, social interaction and imaginative or creative play.

Because autism affects non disordered pupils with habits stressful to others, teachers need to help all students adapt by using different techniques based on the needs of the autistic child. Because autistic children have habits, such as repetitive behavior or sudden outbursts for no reason, a classroom needs to be flexible in order to conform to an individual’s learning needs and be capable of addressing behavioral issues in a calm and understanding, yet disciplinary, manner.

Mainstream schools with successful autism inclusion rely on visual aids, structure and routine to ensure that there are no setbacks later in life for an autistic student. In addition, by pairing an autistic child with a traditional student, an autistic student’s socialization improves through peer interaction and anxiety is reduced. With a well rounded education, the autistic student will be able to conduct daily living needs and function in society as an adult. Autism Teacher Training

While most people rely on two or three learning styles, autistic students use only one style of learning. Because autistic children have different learning styles than traditional students, a dual curriculum is necessary in certain general education areas. Otherwise, the autistic child will be unable to process the information being taught. Autistic children whose learning style is not being met can cause disruptive behavior, such as running around in the classroom or not listening to the teacher. In these situations, a classroom may not be suited for autistic learning.

If teaching styles in a mainstream school cannot be adapted, then a school that is tailored towards the autistic student is the best option. The school environment and teachings will be better geared to the student and there will be no issues with not understanding the behaviors of the disorder.

However, there are pros and cons when comparing an inclusion school to an autistic needs tailor made school. While autistic students can learn from other students, a general education could cause setbacks if educators fail to modify their teaching styles to accommodate autistic students. However, a school tailored only to autism shelters autistic children and prevents them from learning societal challenges among others without the disorder. Autism Teacher Training

While the debate continues to ask whether a general education can cause setbacks, it is known that a proper education for an autistic student requires a nurturing environment that allows the individual to feel comfortable in learning. By doing so, autistic students will be able to find their talents and succeed in life. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autism Teacher Training program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autism Teacher Training is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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