Tag Archives: Pdd Nos

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Donald asks…

Survey: How aware are you?

today is autism awareness day and all of april is autism awareness month i want to see how aware people actually are by asking afew questions
answer with what you honestly know if you want to look up the answers after you answer yours feel free to but not till you answer first

Question 1. what is meant by “autism spectrum” disorders?
2. What are sensory issues?
3 true or false if someone is not diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder by age 12 that means they dont have one.
4. true or false autism is very rare in girls
5.true or false autism spectrum disorders are obvious and you can tell right away if someone has autism
6. what is asperger’s syndrome?

bonus question: can you read this article then tell me your reaction and weather you learned anything new http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/03/05/dont-judge-a-mother-until-you-know-the-whole-story/
oh and for why its in this section is because i feel in my opinion part of being spiritual is being in tune with the world around us and understanding others (or atleast trying to understand others)

admin answers:

1. The autism spectrum consists of classical autism, Asperger’s syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and PDD-NOS. All these disorders involve social and communication issues in some way. The symptoms appear early in childhood and last throughout the lifetime.

2. Sensory issues are a common feature of autism spectrum disorders. Most frequently they are hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity, either in general or with specific stimuli. For example, I’m extremely sensitive to sound, and metal on metal is one sound in particular that’s painful for me. I’m hyposensitive to pain. Another common issue is difficulty filtering out background information, like music playing in the background. Sensitivity and filtering problems can lead to constant sensory overload.

3. False. The symptoms appear early on, but they aren’t necessarily caught early on. I wasn’t diagnosed with Asperger’s until I was 17.

4. False. It appears more common in boys, but the gender gap is actually a lot narrower. Girls are more likely to be misdiagnosed or undiagnosed for a variety of social and cultural reasons.

5. False. People with ASDs may not appear particularly unusual, or they may seem eccentric but not exactly autistic. If everyone could tell right away if someone had an ASD, mental health professionals are wasting their time with diagnostic evaluations!

6. Asperger’s is a mild form of autism. It’s very similar to HFA, but there’s no speech delay.

BQ: I liked the article. I think its meaning can apply to everyone – it’s important to not judge people right away, because you don’t know the whole story. What appears to be a poorly behaved child and an unconcerned mother is actually an overstimulated, anxious autistic child and a caring mother who’s trying to help him the best she can. Everyone has challenges that aren’t obvious from the outside, so it’s important to withhold judgment and keep an open mind, since there’s often more to a situation than meets the eye.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd

John asks…

Which states and school districts have the best services for a child with PDD-NOS?

My child was recently diagnosed with PDD-NOS. I am looking for resources or websites that can help in finding a GREAT school that can help my child. I am not worried about location at this time; I am just looking for a place to start. Thanks.

admin answers:

Rights and information about placement :
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_education_IDEA#Placement

http://info.med.yale.edu/chldstdy/autism/pddnos.html

might find this one useful:
http://www.autism-pdd.net/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=692&PN=1

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd-nos

Nancy asks…

What are the best books to start teaching a child how to read ?

My son will be 5 in may and i want to start teaching him how to read. He was diagnosed with PDD NOS (mild autism) ,so he had some delays. I just need guidance on what books you recommend for me to start with.

admin answers:

Hooked on Phonics is probably one of the very best methods to teach a child how to read.

Http://hooked-on-phonics.com/

It has been around for a good while and is well proven.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Betty asks…

How will Asperger syndrome and PDD be Diagnosed in the future once the definition is Changed?

I heard that instead of 3 being diagnosed with High Functioning Autism (aspergers syndrome), PDD-NOS and Autistic disorder there will only be one type
but, what if the child have mild symptoms of Autism just like Aspergers, how will they be diagnosed? How will Aspergers syndrome and PDD-NOS be diagnosed differently under the dsm-5 if they have symptoms of an autism Spectrum disorder?

admin answers:

Actually there are currently 5 subtypes…also childhood disintegrative disorder and retts

instead of labeling by subtype–they will just use one label for all groups

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Must meet criteria A, B, C, and D:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across contexts, not accounted for by general developmental delays, and manifest by all 3 of the following:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity; ranging from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back and forth conversation through reduced sharing of interests, emotions, and affect and response to total lack of initiation of social interaction,

2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction; ranging from poorly integrated- verbal and nonverbal communication, through abnormalities in eye contact and body-language, or deficits in understanding and use of nonverbal communication, to total lack of facial expression or gestures.

3. Deficits in developing and maintaining relationships, appropriate to developmental level (beyond those with caregivers); ranging from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit different social contexts through difficulties in sharing imaginative play and in making friends to an apparent absence of interest in people

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive speech, motor movements, or use of objects; (such as simple motor stereotypies, echolalia, repetitive use of objects, or idiosyncratic phrases).

2. Excessive adherence to routines, ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior, or excessive resistance to change; (such as motoric rituals, insistence on same route or food, repetitive questioning or extreme distress at small changes).

3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; (such as strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

4. Hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of environment; (such as apparent indifference to pain/heat/cold, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, fascination with lights or spinning objects).

C. Symptoms must be present in early childhood (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities)

D. Symptoms together limit and impair everyday functioning.

Aspergers and PDDNOS CAN fit into this definition….instead of listing different types—there will just be one type…they won’t be diagnosed differently.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Chris asks…

Do you have or have you known someone who has Autism?

I have the disorder known as Atypical Autism. The symptoms that I notice the most in myself are that I seem to lack the ability to empathize with others and I am on the negative end of the spectrum when it comes to socializing.

If you have autism, what parts of it effect you the most…
What part of Autism do you find to be the most debilitating..

admin answers:

Atypical autism is another name for PDD-NOS or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. I have high functioning autism, and I am a sophomore in college majoring in microbiology and neurobiology. What effects me the most is reading social cues and sensory sensitivity. I can’t easily detect whether or not a person is being sincere or sarcastic and I have been taken advantage of because of that. I also have extreme sensitivity to sound. I cannot focus if someone is tapping, I process all sounds at once and cannot ignore any of it. It can lead to a meltdown occasionally. For that reason I have accommodations that allow me to take exams in quiet rooms with white noise headphones. I love pressure and use the squeeze machine invented by Temple Grandin a lot. If you haven’t tried it, you have to. It is Ecstasy to feel the squeeze and it calms me down a lot. For some reason my parents didn’t tell me about my autism until I was 16. I wish they would have done so earlier, up until then. I just assumed I was a bad person. Now I use my insight on autism to improve standards at an autistic school I work at part time

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome Treatment

Carol asks…

Pervasive Developmental Disorder…?

What is it??? What are the causes? What does it do? How to get rid of it if you can……

THANKS !
PLEASE ANSWERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

admin answers:

Pervasive developmental disorders cause abnormal development, including social and communication development. The symptoms appear early on – by the age of 3 at least, except in one of the disorders – and last throughout the lifetime. There are five of them: autism, Asperger’s syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, Rett syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Autism, Asperger’s, and PDD-NOS are called the autism spectrum.

Symptoms of autism include difficulty socializing and communicating with others, delayed speech, lack of eye contact, difficulty interpreting nonverbal signals, intense fixations and interests, repetitive or compulsive movements, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing. The severity of these symptoms varies considerably. Asperger’s syndrome is a mild and high-functioning form of autism. The symptoms are the same except there is no speech delay. PDD-NOS is when someone has some autistic traits and significant impairment, but does not meet the diagnostic criteria for another PDD. These disorders have a genetic basis, but researchers have not yet uncovered the specifics. Some people believe environmental factors also play a role.

Childhood disintegrative disorder is when a child appears to be developing normally, then suddenly regresses sometime after the age of 3. The cause of this disorder is unknown. Rett syndrome occurrs almost exclusively in females. Infants with this disorder experience regression between 6-18 months of age. Symptoms include lack of speech, seizures, sensory problems, poor motor coordination, growth abnormalities, and repetitive movements. It is caused by a gene mutation on the X chromosome.

None of the PDDs are curable. There are many treatments available, including occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, social skills training, behavior therapy, and certain medications.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Donna asks…

Autism / Asperger’s Questions?

I strongly suspect my 2 1/2 year old son has some form of Autism. The only thing that makes everybody a little skeptical is that he shows plenty of emotion, imaginative play, and really looks at you when he’s communicating with you.

Now the reasons I think he is Autistic are that he has yet to develop speech, no social play with his age group, stacks or lines up objects, sometimes tiptoe walks among other little things.

Is it possible for a child that has these characteristics to have Autism or even Aspergers?

Currently I live in Mexico and they more reluctant to diagnose you with Autism here and appears they are not as prepared to deal with this disease than we are in the states(I am an American Citizen married to Mexican woman)

What are some effective home therapies that me and my wife can use on my son while we wait for his documents to arrive so we can have him treated in the States?

Thank You

admin answers:

You aren’t going to come by a diagnosis of asperger’s with a speech delay, that isn’t to say that is not what it is, and that could be flushed out later. Still since the DSM-IV states you cannot have a speech delay and asperger’s only really cutting edge docs will give a r/o dx of asperger’s syndrome with a speech delay only not at his age usually, about 4.

YES, its very possible to have some features of autism, some typical features, and even some asperger features. This has a diagnosis of its own, called PDD.NOS (pervasive developmental delay not otherwise specified. It’s atypical autism, or autistic features.

I remember being confused about the PDD.NOS diagnosis, as I watched my 2 yr old son in the neurologist office feeding a baby while talking on the room phone (that’s a lot of pretend play going on for an autistic kid, or so I thought). He also lined toys up at that age.

Here is a great indicator as to where your son is falling on the spectrum:
http://www.childbrain.com/pddassess.html

Try to make his repetitive play functional. Try to elaborate it. Set up 1:1 playdates. Look into educating yourself on sensory integration. Look at the sensory processing checklist

http://www.asperger.net

For speech, receptive (understanding of language) comes first, so focus on that. Do not use flashcards, they hold little interest to kids of this population, anything 2-D skip. Get the actual object. Ask him to differentiate between 2 common objects. A duck, a ball. Then try to get him to identify the one you are asking for.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Signs In 15 Month Old

Laura asks…

How early are the signs of autism?

And are they linked to vaccines

admin answers:

For some autism they are born with and signs are immediate. A child may not like to be held and squirm to be put down, they don’t smile or sustain eyecontact.

For those that develop autism the signs can start showing before 12 months. I have a son that was dx at 9 months. He did not answer to his name, and repetitively played with the same toy, he was a picky eater, and avoided eyecontact. He is not vaccinated. He has a dx of PDD.NOS

My oldest son developed autism later he also is PDD.NOS and was typical through 15 months. He was vaccinated through age 2.

Is autism linked to vaccines? Autism is an autoimmune disorder, and autoimmune disorders in general are on the rise epidemically especially allergies. I believe that vaccines contribute. The overload of toxins on an immature dysfunctional immune system can manifest in all kinds of ways like autism, allergies, bipolar, ADD/HD ect. Genetics are an integral component. So my answer would be yes indirectly autism can be linked to vaccines in some cases. So can a virus, oxygen deprivation during birth resulting in TBI traumatic brain injury, there seems to be an Rh connection in mothers of autistic children, also many moms fail the triple screen when pregnant who go on to have autistic children. There are so many correlations, its very complex.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd-nos

Sandy asks…

Should my oldest child with Aspergers or baby have their own room?

My seven year old son has Aspergers and my five year old son has PDD-NOS. They have been sharing a room for the past few years but my oldest has started to ask for his own room. The problem is, I have a one year old daughter and we live in a three bedroom house. I don’t know if I should give the boys their own room and put her in our bedroom. If anyone has any insight or suggestions I would really appreciate it!

admin answers:

Nobody knows your kids like you. Nobody knows the specific issues your Aspergers and PDD-NOS kids have like you do. Nobody knows how often your 1 yr old climbs in with you anyway or how well she does in your room. So nobody here can come close to saying what *you* should do.

That said… We have a *tiny* three bedroom house with four kids (13, 6, 4.5, and 3yrs) and are expecting our fifth. My oldest has Aspergers and we suspect the 3 yr old may as well. So far the 6 yr old is the only girl.

One bedroom is so small we just used it as a ‘computer room’ for years and put all the kids in the biggest bedroom… But the youngest actually slept with us. But with the oldest being so much older we finally moved him into that room alone last year. Now the others still have the big room and the new baby will be sharing with us.

With your boys being so close in age… I personally like the idea of giving them the big room and ‘splitting’ it for them. However… I don’t have a clue what sort of Aspie issues you are having between the two of them. That would be the deciding factor to me. If they really *need* their space and the little girl likes sharing your room… That would simply make more sense for you. But if they are only asking for their own room and not really showing signs of *needing* it… I think I’d leave them.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers