Tag Archives: Parts Of The Brain

Question?: Rett Syndrome Genetics

George asks…

what is autism?

Im not sure what that is

admin answers:

Autism is a brain development disorder that impairs social interaction and communication, and causes restricted and repetitive behavior, all starting before a child is three years old. This set of signs distinguishes autism from milder autism spectrum disorders (ASD) such as Asperger syndrome.[2]

Autism has a strong genetic basis, although the genetics of autism are complex and it is unclear whether ASD is explained more by multigene interactions or by rare mutations.[3] In rare cases, autism is strongly associated with agents that cause birth defects.[4] Other proposed causes, such as childhood vaccines, are controversial and the vaccine hypotheses lack convincing scientific evidence.[5] Most recent reviews estimate a prevalence of one to two cases per 1,000 people for autism, and about six per 1,000 for ASD, with ASD averaging a 4.3:1 male-to-female ratio. The number of people known to have autism has increased dramatically since the 1980s, at least partly due to changes in diagnostic practice; the question of whether actual prevalence has increased is unresolved.[6]

Autism affects many parts of the brain; how this occurs is poorly understood. Parents usually notice signs in the first two years of their child’s life. Early behavioral or cognitive intervention can help children gain self-care, social, and communication skills. There is no cure.[7] Few children with autism live independently after reaching adulthood, but some become successful,[8] and an autistic culture has developed, with some seeking a cure and others believing that autism is a condition rather than a disorder.[9]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Classification
* 2 Characteristics
o 2.1 Social development
o 2.2 Communication
o 2.3 Repetitive behavior
o 2.4 Other symptoms
* 3 Causes
* 4 Mechanism
o 4.1 Pathophysiology
o 4.2 Neuropsychology
* 5 Screening
* 6 Diagnosis
* 7 Management
* 8 Prognosis
* 9 Epidemiology
* 10 History
* 11 References
* 12 External links

Classification

Autism is a brain development disorder that first gives signs during infancy or childhood and follows a steady course without remission or relapse.[2] Impairments result from maturation-related changes in various systems of the brain.[10] Autism is one of the five pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), which are characterized by widespread abnormalities of social interactions and communication, and severely restricted interests and highly repetitive behavior.[2]
Hans Asperger introduced the modern sense of the word autism in 1938.
Hans Asperger introduced the modern sense of the word autism in 1938.[11]

Of the other four PDD forms, Asperger syndrome is closest to autism in signs and likely causes; Rett syndrome and childhood disintegrative disorder share several signs with autism, but may have unrelated causes; PDD not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) is diagnosed when the criteria are not met for a more specific disorder.[12] Unlike autism, Asperger’s has no substantial delay in language development.[13] The terminology of autism can be bewildering, with autism, Asperger’s and PDD-NOS often called the autism spectrum disorders (ASD)[7] or sometimes the autistic disorders,[14] whereas autism itself is often called autistic disorder, childhood autism, or infantile autism. In this article, autism refers to the classic autistic disorder, while other sources sometimes use autism or the autisms to refer to ASD,[15] or equate ASD with PDD.[16] ASD, in turn, is a subset of the broader autism phenotype (BAP), which describes individuals who may not have ASD but do have autistic-like traits, such as avoiding eye contact.[17]

The manifestations of autism cover a wide spectrum, ranging from individuals with severe impairments—who may be silent, mentally disabled, and locked into hand flapping and rocking—to less impaired individuals who may have active but distinctly odd social approaches, narrowly focused interests, and verbose, pedantic communication.[18] Sometimes the syndrome is divided into low-, medium- and high-functioning autism (LFA, MFA, and HFA), based on IQ thresholds,[19] or on how much support the individual requires in daily life; these subdivisions are not standardized and are controversial. Autism can also be divided into syndromal and non-syndromal autism, where the former is associated with severe or profound mental retardation or a congenital syndrome with physical symptoms, such as tuberous sclerosis.[20] Although individuals with Asperger’s tend to perform better cognitively than those with autism, the extent of the overlap between Asperger’s, HFA, and non-syndromal autism is unclear.[21]

Some studies have reported diagnoses of autism in children due to a loss of language or social skills after 14 months of age, as opposed to a failure to make progress. Several terms are used for this phenomenon, including regressive autism, setback autism, and developmental stagnation. The validity of this distinction remains controversial; it is possible that regressive autism is a specific subtype.[22][23][24]

Characteristics

Autism is distinguished by a pattern of symptoms rather than one single symptom. The main characteristics are impairments in social interaction, impairments in communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis.[25] Individual symptoms of autism occur in the general population and appear not to associate highly, without a sharp line separating pathological severity from common traits.[26]

Social development

People with autism have social impairments and often lack the intuition about others that many people take for granted. Noted autistic Temple Grandin described her inability to understand the social communication of neurotypicals as leaving her feeling “like an anthropologist on Mars”.[27]

Social impairments become apparent early in childhood and continue through adulthood. Autistic infants show less attention to social stimuli, smile and look at others less often, and respond less to their own name. Autistic toddlers have more striking social deviance; for example, they have less eye contact and anticipatory postures and are more likely to communicate by manipulating another person’s hand.[24] Three- to five-year-old autistic children are less likely to exhibit social understanding, approach others spontaneously, imitate and respond to emotions, communicate nonverbally, and take turns with others. However, they do form attachments to their primary caregivers.[28] They display moderately less attachment security than usual, although this feature disappears in children with higher mental development or less severe ASD.[29] Older children and adults with ASD perform worse on tests of face and emotion recognition.[30]

Contrary to common belief, autistic children do not prefer to be alone. Making and maintaining friendships often proves to be difficult for those with autism. For them, the quality of friendships, not the number of friends, predicts how lonely they are.[31]

There are many anecdotal reports, but few systematic studies, of aggression and violence in individuals with ASD. The limited data suggest that in children with mental retardation, autism is associated with aggression, destruction of property, and tantrums. Dominick et al. Interviewed the parents of 67 children with ASD and reported that about two-thirds of the children had periods of severe tantrums and about one-third had a history of aggression, with tantrums significantly more common than in children with a history of language impairment.[32]

Communication

About a third to a half of individuals with autism do not develop enough natural speech to meet their daily communication needs.[33] Differences in communication may be present from the first year of life, and may include delayed onset of babbling, unusual gestures, diminished responsiveness, and the desynchronization of vocal patterns with the caregiver. In the second and third years, autistic children have less frequent and less diverse babbling, consonants, words, and word combinations; their gestures are less often integrated with words. Autistic children are less likely to make requests or share experiences, and are more likely to simply repeat others’ words (echolalia)[23][34] or reverse pronouns.[35] Joint attention seems to be necessary for functional speech, and deficits in joint attention seem to distinguish infants with ASD:[1] for example, they may look at a pointing hand instead of the pointed-at object,[24][34] and they consistently fail to point to “comment” about or “share” an experience at age-appropriate times.[1] Autistic children may have difficulty with imaginative play and with developing symbols into language.[23][34]

In a pair of studies, high-functioning autistic children aged 8–15 performed equally well, and adults better than individually matched controls at basic language tasks involving vocabulary and spelling. Both autistic groups performed worse than controls at complex language tasks such as figurative language, comprehension and inference. As people are often sized up initially from their basic language skills, these studies suggest that people speaking to autistic individuals are more likely to overestimate what their audience comprehends.[36]

Repetitive behavior
A young boy with autism, and the precise line of toys he made
A young boy with autism, and the precise line of toys he made

Autistic individuals display many forms of repetitive or restricted behavior, which the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R)[37] categorizes as follows.

* Stereotypy is apparently purposeless movement, such as hand flapping, head rolling, or body rocking.
* Comp

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In 6 Year Old

Mandy asks…

What are your tips about tutoring an 8 year old with Autism?

He is in the 2nd grade and he can read on the 2nd grade reading level though his reading comprehension is poor. That is what I’ll be working with him on mostly. I will also be working on his handwriting as his small motor skills are not strong. His speech delay puts his communication level at about 4 years old.

I will be working with him 3 times a week.

admin answers:

First be sure you know what it is…

Autism is a brain development disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. These signs all begin before a child is three years old.[2] The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) also include related conditions with milder signs and symptoms.[3]

Autism has a strong genetic basis, although the genetics of autism are complex and it is unclear whether ASD is explained more by multigene interactions or by rare mutations.[4] In rare cases, autism is strongly associated with agents that cause birth defects.[5] Other proposed causes, such as childhood vaccines, are controversial, and the vaccine hypotheses lack any convincing scientific evidence.[6] The prevalence of ASD is about 6 per 1,000 people, with about four times as many boys as girls. The number of people known to have autism has increased dramatically since the 1980s, partly due to changes in diagnostic practice; the question of whether actual prevalence has increased is unresolved.[7]

Autism affects many parts of the brain; how this occurs is not understood. Parents usually notice signs in the first two years of their child’s life. Although early behavioral or cognitive intervention can help children gain self-care, social, and communication skills, there is no known cure.[3] Few children with autism live independently after reaching adulthood, but some become successful,[8] and an autistic culture has developed, with some seeking a cure and others believing that autism is a condition rather than a disorder.[9]

Second…

Autistic kids often have one particular thing that they are focused on and love. I.E. Cars, or trains, or scooby doo. Figure out what that is and incorporate it into your tutoring. This will help keep their attention.

Third…

Do your research.. There is HUNDEREDS of sights on the internet about working with Autistic children.

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Asperger’s Syndrome – Biological basis

Autistic individuals tend to use different are...

Because of its relative inaccessibility, researchers have only recently been able to study the brain systematically. But with the innovative emergence of new brain imaging tools – computerized tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), study of the structure and the functioning of the brain can be done.

With the aid of modern technology and the new availability of both normal and autism tissue samples to do post-mortem studies, researchers will be able to learn much through comparative studies. Post-mortem and MRI studies have shown that many major brain structures are implicated in autism. This includes the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, limbic system, corpus callosum, basal ganglia, and brain stem.

It appears that in autism a disorder is found in the structure of the brain, e.g. the little brain(cerebellum). There is a disorder localized in the frontal lobes. Low blood flow to certain parts of the brain and reduced numbers of certain brain cells also seem to appear along with autism traits.

An exciting development is the Autism Tissue Program Studies of the postmortem brain with imaging methods will help us learn why some brains are large, how the limbic system(interconnected system of brain nuclei associated with basic needs and emotions such as hunger, pain, pleasure, satisfaction, sex, and instinctive motivation) develops, and how the brain changes as it ages. Tissue samples can be stained and will show which neurotransmitters are being made in the cells and how they are transported and released to other cells. By focusing on specific brain regions and neurotransmitters, it will become easier to identify susceptibility genes.

Other research is focusing on the role of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, and epinephrine. Problems are found in the general functioning of the brain as a result of a shortage or excess of neurotransmitters (dopamine and serotonin). As a result information entering the brain is not correctly processed.

There is a report by Edwin Cook and his colleagues that the first gene of autism relates to processing serotonin in the brain. In 1990, Dr. Cook said, “the most consistent finding has been over 25% of autistic children and adolescents are hyperserotonemic. After decades of investigation the mechanism of hyperserotonemia has not been determined.” Hyperserotonemia is where you have high-elevated serotonin levels.

Only recently researchers at the School of Medicine have discovered in the placenta what may be the earliest marker for autism, possibly helping physicians diagnose the condition at birth, rather than the standard age of 2 or older. Current studies are searching for characteristics in children at risk for ASD so that the diagnosis can be made prior to age 1. The ideal time for diagnosis would be at birth, according to senior author on the study Dr. Harvey J. Kliman, research scientist in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at the School of Medicine. They found that the placentas from ASD children were three times more likely to have trophoblast (the embryo’s outer layer) inclusions. Kliman and the team identified trophoblast inclusions by performing microscopic examinations of placental tissues.

“We knew that trophoblast inclusions were increased in cases of chromosome abnormalities and genetic diseases, but we had no idea whether they would be significantly increased in cases of ASD,” says Kliman. “These results are consistent with studies by others who have shown that ASD has a clear genetic basis.” Trophoblast inclusions reflect abnormal folding of microscopic layers in the placenta and appear to result from altered cell growth.

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Augmented Brain Functionality With Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

The human brain is like a super computer. With complex components, they are the processing unit ensuring that the human body works to its optimum level. The scientists are still amazed at the functionality of this organ and there is always an ongoing research to discover the full potential of the brain. But when the brain is damaged, and results in some parts being dead, it directly undermines some operative function rendering the part inefficient. This is the reason that the people select all possible methods to heal faster.

The human brain can be affected due to many reasons. Some may be genetic like that of autism, cerebral palsy or the Alzheimer’s disease, some may be accidental and some may not have any explanation at all. This is the reason that people wish for the brain to function as it does for the other normal beings. Out of varied neurological treatments available in the market, the hyperbaric oxygen therapy is one of them.

The Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy has its roots as the treatment for decompression. But later when researched, it was found that hyperbaric oxygen therapy had other significant uses. It could cure gas gangrene, reduce the carbon monoxide toxicity, eradicate carbon dioxide poisoning and showed improved differences in the autistic children. So what is really hyperbaric oxygen therapy? Hyperbaric means in higher pressure. The person is introduced into chambers which have oxygen at higher pressure. The oxygen dissolves in the blood more than normal, increasing the flow of oxygen even in the dead parts of the brain. This therapy has been found to show a marked improvement in patients suffering from the disorders of the nervous system. This therapy ensures that there is increased blood flow in the affected areas. The higher oxygen content once being introduced into the tissues increases the healing process. The very first symptom of the improvement is the increased brain function and thereby leads to the rapid progression of the other relevant brain functions.

Some smile, some wave, some converse, and some feel euphoric after the treatment. When the complex central nervous system is acquainted with an oxygen rich environment, it starts the recovery process. There are the behavioral changes also. The oxygen aids in regaining the dead neurons and thus starts the healing process. The brain perceives the most in the oxygen rich atmosphere, but all other body parts also partake in the therapeutic healing of the body.

Some people choose the hyperbaric centers for the sessions. These usually come with the latest advanced chambers that provide the best of the facilities. Medical personnel monitor the entire process so that any discomfort can be treated immediately. These centers are equipped with state-of-art amenities to help ensure a comfortable session. Some people purchase these chambers especially if they require frequent treatment sessions.

Allen Wood evaluates the importance of treatment via the hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the autistic children. She has found that those undergoing these sessions in a Hyperbaric Centers or at home, to have shown marked improvement in the brain functionality and the behavior.

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Types Of Autism Revealed

The term “autism” is a generalized term which falls inside a larger medical category oftentimes called “the 5 Pervasive Development Disorders”. Autism is the most common type of development disorder and can appear in a range of  types and severity of condition. This has led to the term “Autism Spectrum Disorder” which can be often used to identify and discuss the differing types of autism. What this implies is that someone diagnosed as having autism will have one of several different types of autism which have features that are comparable in some respects and different in others.

Inside the Autism Spectrum Disorder there exists four subcategories of autism which are Asperger Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder and Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified or “PDD-NOS”. Seeing as each of these are types of autism they all share some general autism traits.

It is generally acknowledged that autism is related to the brain or what some are now calling “mindblindness”. At some point between birth and the first two-and-a-half years of age there’s a serious development problem inside the brain that prevents parts of the brain from functioning as one. As the child gets older they find it more and more difficult to communicate and connect to other people around them in what we deem a normal and socially acceptable manner. Dependant upon how bad the brain disorder was early on in life will determine how serious the type of autism is when the child becomes older.

What we have discussed thus far has told us that all types of autism are linked to a condition within the brain. Now we will look at how each of the types of autism are different.

1. Asperger Syndrome (AS)

indicated by impaired speech and communication skills
restrictive patterns in the manner the individual behaves and thinks

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Children with Asperger Syndrome often exhibit very obsessive behavior towards a single subject or topic and refuse to focus on anything else. This makes it very difficult for them to socialize with others, especially their peer group and they find it hard to talk and interact normally. Also very common is delayed learning when it comes to motor skills like riding a bike, being able to catch a ball or even climbing on playground equipment. The child is usually thought of as being clumsy and inept.

2. Rett Syndrome

symptoms tend to be noticed earlier on in a child’s life than other types of autism
generally is encountered only in girls and unexpectedly begins to surface some six to eighteen months after a normal infant development pattern

A baby with Rett Syndrome exhibits a slow down or oftentimes even a loss of customary development skills that were already developed before Rett Syndrome. Added signs of this infant disorder may include problems learning to walk, increased delay in learning basic motor skills and often there is a lessening in skull growth rate.

3. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD)

less common type of autism
occurs later than other types of autism, not until around age 3 or four
frequently a dramatic loss of social, communication and other kinds of skills

A child afflicted with CDD generally has demonstrated normal development well beyond that phase where other types of autism may become evident. Everything appears fine, until unexpectedly around the ages of 3 or 4 the child in a short time begins to have difficulty speaking normally, doing social activities with others and begins to fall behind in normal skill development for their age group. In very severe cases this may even lead to mental retardation.

4. Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS)

generally the mildest type of autism and is usually diagnosed around 4 years old
core features are problems with social interaction and communication

A child with PDD-NOS enjoys the company of other people but has a difficult time reacting appropriately and making genuine connections with their friends. For example they find it difficult to relate to the feelings of others, and as such would not know how to appriopriately react if someone is laughing or crying. Areas of difficulty with respect to communicating with other people include a restricted vocabulary, repetitive language, narrow interests and poor nonverbal communication.

As you can see the definition of autism just isn’t so simple as many people presume it to be. Differing autism features have given rise to a number of different types of autism that will impinge on children and adults in a wide range of ways, often depending upon how severe the condition is for that person.

It is extremely important to understand that the above facts about autism, together with the types of autism discussed, are merely general guidelines and are in no way intended to be a medical diagnosis. If you believe that your son or daughter may have autism, then please seek out medical advice from a physician.

Take action now to find out more about what is autism disorder and learn to help your child and yourself as a concerned parent or an adult dealing with autism. Visit our website now to learn more about the types of autism and much more. Articles on autism, videos and links to other resources including books on autism. Let us help you as we have already helped hundreds of other concerned parents with autistic children as well as adults with autism .
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Autism Sign Language – Using Sign Language With an Autistic Child

Autism Sign Language

In recent times a expanding interest has been make it out to teaching sign blabber to autistic children who own failed to develop speech. Sign language is a gobbledygook which relies on movements of hands, arms or body and facial expressions in order to communicate. Autism Sign Language

This is commonly exhausted by deaf people or hard of hearing people. But it is also becoming popularly exhausted by other sectors, especially hearing non verbal children who suffer from diminished syndrome, trauma, autism, cerebral palsy, brain disorders and speech disorders.

More and more parents now rely on sign language as a mode of quick communication particularly among their children who have with very brief thought spans or limited language capabilities. Autism is a brain development disorder which results in damage to social skills, language and behavior. This disorder causes restricted and repetitive behavior which can be identified during infancy or childhood years. Autism affects many parts of the brain and parents are able to notice signs in the first few years of their child’s life.

One of the main questions arising with regard to an autistic child would be whether he/she is ever able to develop speech. According to recent research it is conveyed that with appropriate interventions there is a possibility that children with autism can learn to talk. There are several ways to help autistic children to talk. And the most popular way is to teach speech through the utilization of sign language. Autism Sign Language

Researchers suggest that the use of sign language increases the chances of autistic children learning the spoken language. In addition it also provides children with an alternative mode of communication. It is easy for parents or caregivers to learn sign language and utilize it while interacting with an autistic child. Also it is found that autistic children are able to learn signing successfully.

Some reasons for this are that signs can be physically guided unlike speech, signs can be frozen in time in order for the child to process it, sign language is more iconic than speech, individual signs can be easily grasped and it is believed that signing is processed in the right hemisphere of the brain. Since research has shown there may be differential disturbance of left hemisphere brain functions in autistic children this might be another reason why signing is easier for them to learn.

Teaching sign language to the child would provide him/her with a way of expressing his/her needs in a manner which is more socially accepted and easily understood. Due to this the child would experience less frustration. Also an increase in social awareness and decrease in tantrums due to frustration will follow with the ability to communicate. Autism Sign Language

Another more crucial advantage in teaching sign language is that it would lessen some of the learning problems that autistic children face. It is believed that through acquiring sign language early on, the child is able to build up cognitive structures which are the basis for later learning. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Sign Language program now!

Autism Sign Language is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Asperger Syndrome: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

The Asperger’s Syndrome was named after a Viennese pediatrician, Hans Asperger. In 1944, he explained the reason behind inefficiency in social behavior but normal intelligence in his male patients. This is a neurological disorder in which the person suffering shows a number of typical characteristics like odd patterns in speech, obsessions, poor coordination, inefficiency in social interaction and several other peculiar behaviors. The children who suffer from this disorder find it difficult to differentiate the various body languages and are able to show only a few facial expressions. They may be obsessive about their routines and may be unusually sensitive to some sensory stimuli.

It was noted by Asperger that though the males suffering from this condition show normal language development and intelligence, they find it hard to effectively communicate their ideas. They may have problems with paying attention for longer spans and they are also known to have a behavior that others find odd or eccentric. These conditions do not go away with age and an adult who has this condition shows the same symptoms. However, despite Asperger’s Syndrome being a lifetime condition, if it is diagnosed at an early stage and proper services are provided, there is a chance that the symptoms may reduce with time.

Causes: Though there is no specific cause known for the condition, it is generally suggested that it is genetic, possibly running through generations in a family. Also, it is thought that some fetal development problems might cause this condition considering the differences in structure and function of specific parts of the brain. Some researches showed that the condition might be associated with depression, bipolar disorder and other mental disorders. There is a wrong idea that the condition is caused due to bad parenting. However, Asperger’s syndrome is a neurological disorder and does not depend on the upbringing of the child.

Symptoms: In most cases, Asperger’s syndrome is diagnosed in children in the age of 5-9 years. It might be difficult to differentiate the symptoms from troubles in behavior and this is why they can be evaluated only by professionals in many cases. The diagnosis of this condition is often confused with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder or ADHD.

Treatment: There is neither a cure not an effective medical treatment for Asperger’s Syndrome. There can be treatment for some symptoms like depression which are associated with the condition. The main treatment for this condition is training as in the case of Autism. Training for modification in behavior and social skills has found to be effective. Training may also be provided for decision making, problem solving and other skills.

The condition does not mean that a person suffering from it will not be able to succeed socially and academically. In fact, there are many people suffering from the Asperger’s syndrome who believe that this condition is more of a “difference” and not a “disorder”. There are people with this condition who are leading a full and happy life through proper education and support.

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Autistic Language – Using Sign Language With an Autistic Child

Autistic Language

In most recent times a growing interest has been directed to teaching sign jargon to autistic children who undergo failed to boost speech. Sign language is a gobbledygook that relies on movements of hands, arms or body and facial sayings in form to communicate. Autistic Language

This is commonly used by deaf people or hard of hearing people. But it is also becoming popularly used by a good amount of sectors, especially hearing non verbal children who have from down syndrome, trauma, autism, cerebral palsy, brain disorders and speech disorders. Autistic Language

More and more parents now rely on sign blabber as a mode of quick communication particularly with the children who experience with very brief deliberation spans or limited blabber capabilities. Autism is a brain development disorder which results in damage to social skills, language and behavior. This disorder causes restricted and repetitive behavior which can be identified during infancy or childhood years. Autistic Language

Autism affects many parts of the brain and parents are able to notice signs in the first few years of their child’s life. One of the main questions arising with regard to an autistic child would be whether he/she is ever able to develop speech. According to recent research it is conveyed that with appropriate interventions there is a possibility that children with autism can learn to talk. There are several ways to help autistic children to talk. And the most popular way is to teach speech through the utilization of sign language. Autistic Language

Researchers suggest that the use of sign language increases the chances of autistic children learning the spoken language. In addition it also provides children with an alternative mode of communication. It is easy for parents or caregivers to learn sign language and utilize it while interacting with an autistic child. Also it is found that autistic children are able to learn signing successfully. Autistic Language

Some reasons for this are that signs can be physically guided unlike speech, signs can be frozen in time in order for the child to process it, sign language is more iconic than speech, individual signs can be easily grasped and it is believed that signing is processed in the right hemisphere of the brain. Since research has shown there may be differential disturbance of left hemisphere brain functions in autistic children this might be another reason why signing is easier for them to learn. Autistic Language

Teaching sign language to the child would provide him/her with a way of expressing his/her needs in a manner which is more socially accepted and easily understood. Due to this the child would experience less frustration. Also an increase in social awareness and decrease in tantrums due to frustration will follow with the ability to communicate. Autistic Language

Another more crucial advantage in teaching sign language is that it would lessen some of the learning problems that autistic children face. It is believed that through acquiring sign language early on, the child is able to build up cognitive structures which are the basis for later learning. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Language program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Language is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Autism Spectrum Disorder:: Asperger’s Syndrome:: Women and Girls

Asperger’s syndrome is predominately a male’s condition.  Wrong!  Times have changed and what with the new research, it has been found that women and girls are left undiagnosed.  This is because this form of autism spectrum disorder in females are far harder to identify than their male counterparts.

 

In this article, following from Dr Tony Attwood’s ‘Asperger’s and Girls’ book on his research, we look at another perspective from Rudy Simone.  As an Asperger’s syndrome woman, you are given an insight not only on how she perceives the condition, but her personal understanding too.  ‘Aspergirls’, her book, shows a continuation in a similar theme to Dr Attwoods research.

 

This article tackles many issues and includes a video interview from Rudy Simone as she takes you through what she has discovered with this condition.

It covers the following issues:

Why Is It Difficult To Diagnose Asperger’s Females?
Females Communicate More Effectively Than Males Because They Use Both Parts of the Brain!
Women Creative, Men More Logical
Females are More in Tune With Emotions
Asperger’s Syndrome is not Exclusively a Male Condition
People with Autism Spectrum Disorders are Individual. They Display Different Aspects Of Behaviours.
Rudy Simone and Asperger’s Syndrome
Asperger’s Syndrome and Gender Identity
Social Situations and Freak Out!
Diagnosis Could Make The Difference To Living A Fuller Life Instead Of A Struggle

It is exciting to discover that Asperger’s syndrome is not an exclusive condition for men and boys, but for women and girls too.  The only difference is that women and girls can ‘fake it’ better than their male counterparts.  If you would like to read more on what Rudy Simone and this article has to say, please click on the following link:

Autism Spectrum Disorder:: Asperger’s Syndrome:: Women and Girls
Click Do You Think Your Child Has Asperger’s Syndrome? Autistic Spectrum Disorder – Which Way Now? for more on diagnosis.
Mother of two boys, 40 something ‘Rock Chick’, married. OU Diploma in Health and Social Welfare, qualifications in Psychology and Certificate in Further education. I can now confidently describe myself as a worldy wise writer.My philosophy: ‘Life is For Living!’If you want to learn more about me:Follow me on TwitterCheck Me Out on FacebookHug Me on Myspace 
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