Tag Archives: Parents

Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Jenny asks…

3 month old Autism advice?

Hello,

My 3 month old daughter is unfortunately showing the signs of Autism. Our Pedi is asking us to wait 2 more weeks to see if she starts to make better eye contact and starts to smile but in my gut, sadly, I feel like this will be the diagnosis. We have already called a specialist who wont be able to see us until August.

My question to the group, is there any advice in terms of treatment or exercises I can do with the baby to help her along? I feel helpless and want to do anything I can to help my little girl.

Thank you in advance for your replies
I truly appreciate the posts so far. 2 follow ups 1. We had her eyes checked last week and she passed with flying colors. 2. According to several websites early signs of Autism can be detected in 3 months http://www.parents.com/baby/health/autism/autism-month-by-month-guide/

Thank you all again!

admin answers:

I am by no means totally educated on the fact, but I am fairly certain that autism is not something that is diagnosed in infants. It becomes apparent in toddler hood and a lengthy observation period follows before a true diagnosis of autism. If your baby is unresponsive to stimuli and not smiling, there could be literally hundreds of other reasons. Your baby is only 3 months old, I would not stress out until you know a bit more information. But please try and relax in the knowledge that autism is not apparent in a 3 month old baby.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Adults

Chris asks…

Why is there controversy over the Combating Autism Act? What does it involve?

Autism is not a mental illness, but a neuro-biological disorder. But I’m not sure what category would be best for this question. I hope placing it here in the mental health section does not offend anyone. If it does, I’d like to apologize.

Ok, what exactly is the Combating Autism Act, and why are many parents of Autustic children, and many Autistic adults against it? Will this act find ways to prevent children with this syndrome from being born, or will it simply spread awareness about Autism, and provide treatment so that Autistics can function with more ease in society?

Would this also apply to people with Aspergers? Also, what will this mean for adults who have gone undiagnosed for years, only to find out at 20, 30, and older they have an autistic spectrum disorder? Will they be ostracized even more if Autism is eventually gotten rid of in the future? I’m confused and interested in hearing both sides. Thanks.

admin answers:

The Combating Autism Act is all about diverting funds to research a way to detect autism while the child is in the womb. There already is such a test for cystic fibrosis, spina bifida, and Down Syndrome. I cannot speak for CF or for SB, but I can for the DS. This sounds great, I know! I thought it was at first. My 5 yr old is autistic, and I would have loved to have known in advance that he had it, to have time to prepare, to research, to be more understanding from the start. What I learned though is that after this test for Downs was approved and in place, fewer babies were born with Downs, because the parents chose to abort the babies. A lot of us are seriously against the act because as parents of children with autism, we KNOW that even though our children have serious challenges and life isn’t always fun, our kids are so wonderful! They have moments that just blow you away, and can be so full of love. But, I can guarantee you that parents will not be told this when they test positive, and how unfair is that to abort a child with only hearing the scary, unknown possibilities? I took that stupid test for downs with my youngest child, and it came up positive, although I don’t remember the ‘chance’ they gave, but it was a high chance. I refused to take the amnio, because that can cause miscarriage and babies have been damaged from this. The specialist did everything he could to talk me into aborting my child, because of ‘how difficult it can be to raise a special needs baby’. If I wasn’t strong on my stance I probably would have aborted. How sad is that? My child didn’t have Downs! I found out that that test is not very accurate at all, that there is a high percentage of false positives. So, how many little lives were lost because of one-sided information and fear? It’s our fear that the same exact thing will happen with autism. Thing is, Autism Speaks, one of the biggest fundraisers for autism research, supports the combating autism act, so I don’t support them or any of the other high profile companies. If they would instead focus on testing these children AT BIRTH to determine if they had it, I would give them every dollar I have. But, I cannot and will not support a cause that ‘could’ basically cause a whole ‘type’ of people to be erased from the planet. Here’s a link for you to look at, it’s the one that started opening my eyes.

Http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9yFsQm2Bp4

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Question?: What Is Autism Yahoo Answers

Joseph asks…

Can anyone help me with a report I am doing about parents with children who have autism?

I am a pre-professional educator and we are required by the university to write a report based off an interview with a parent who has a child with a disability. I would really like to write my report based off someone who has autism. If there is anyone who can help, it would be greatly appreciated.

admin answers:

I’m not sure how much help I could be, but I’d be happy to help if needed. My son is young he just turned 2 in May, he was diagnosed with autism at 20 months. If I theres any questions I can answer for you I’d be happy to help. Kijejo43@yahoo.com Good luck.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Laura asks…

3 year old daughter’s speech. Need other parents’ advice!?

A few days ago, I read a book titled, “The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late” by Thomas Sowell. The book is of course about children who don’t speak or speak very little until they are between 2-4 years old. It emphasizes that bright children also can begin to speak very early, but (focuses on those who do not.)

My daughter is nearly 3. She does not carry on a conversation with anyone, points to most things she wants or we have to “read” her to pick up on what she needs. She sings the alphabet song, counts 1-20, says some sentences that I can comprehend but other sentences I cannot understand. Most times, I only know she is speaking actual sentences when she is going along with what she has “memorized” from commercials or movies while watching them- sometimes she just sits down and recites the movies and commercials from memory, although her words “jumble” together to the point where someone who didn’t know her wouldn’t know she was actually talking. She also loves to cuddle, hug, and play with other children, and she seems to understand some commands very well, and at other times she does not.

I read in the above book that “experts” are too quick to label a child “slow”, autistic, or as having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder when the child is only highly intelligent, strong willed, or just going at his or her own time-frame when it comes to social interactions and learning the practicalities of everyday life. Many of the late talkers in his study grew up to be engineers, mathematicians, or in other fields which require significant analytical skills. I am not suggesting that my daughter will be a genius. I just have a feeling that she should be allowed to “prosper” naturally. Certain people-those who haven’t had children in 30-60 years and one controlling, passive aggressive doctor (forgive me God for the criticism) who wouldn’t respect my questions and suggestions as a parent-think she needs help! I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with similar children, I would love your input! I have already read about parents of adult children who had similar “difficulties” as children and had no medical intervention; those adults are doing well.

I do not want to overlook a “problem” that may in fact exist. I am very nervous about taking my daughter to a specialist who may interpret a problem where there is none. I know I’m probably answering my own question, but…

What do you think?
A specialist can’t always tell the difference in my opinion, but thank you soooo much Sari Lynn for your insight!
Thank you Happymomof2. All I can say is that I know what you mean about worrying when I shouldn’t and being made to feel that what is actually “normal” is a delay or problem. I know I shouldn’t worry. My gut tells me everything is okay. It’s only an insecurity that gets me to ask for other people’s opinions about my daughter. I am a stay at home mom and will continue to work with her in a steady fashion. I know she will “catch up!”
Lauren R, I will surely take your advice! Thanks for the info! I worry about being impressionable and influenced if I were to find services available to my daughter, but realizing that I would be in total control of her health and safety help me to not be afraid to work with the professionals if I have to!
ADDED: In the meantime, why don’t you read information from reputable, science-based sources rather than pop-culture sensationalistic books (see below for links).
The Einstein story makes me crazy: Einstein was a genius in one particular area, but a total incompetent in many social (communication!) areas,~Anonymous

Anonymous, it seems as though you’re trying to be “kind” in your response. But, I don’t feel comfortable. I worry enough about my daughter, which is why I’m afraid to go to a specialist who may refer to her as “incompetent”! So, what would that make the specialist? Maybe she does need speech therapy, but I will be sure not to go to someone who labels her “incompetent”! Who says you do well in all your social interactions with others-you just learn to disguise your “fumbles” through the way you’ve learned to communicate!
I stated “I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with SIMILAR children, I would love your input!”
EDIT: THANK YOU so much for your post Beetlemilk. I will take heed to and look into all the info you have given me!

admin answers:

You are the foremost expert on your child, not any doctor.

I am very similar to your daughter and am 38 yrs old. My father has similarities too. In 1975 I was referred to a behavioral psychologist for peculiar vernacular, and addressing my parents by their names and not pronouns. I was promptly diagnosed ‘Autistic’. I went on to receive many diagnoses, most which were inaccurate like 1978’s school psychologist Stanford-Binet IQ test that resulted in mentally retarded. An independent test I hit the ceiling and was diagnosed as super gifted. I am very bright, I have some social quirks, its functional. I’ve gotten married, had children, held a job, drive, graduated many times from college. I’ve been diagnosed 7x as autistic, 3 were diagnosed asperger’s.

My father was diagnosed Autistic in 1950. He is a director and psychologist for a residential autistic setting. He is thrice times married. He is gifted, has a rather flat affect most of the time and is difficult to engage in conversation. He was hyperlexic, reading @ age 2. He is asperger’s and was diagnosed in 1988 when I was.

I have a son diagnosed autistic and I disagree. Autism like ADHD is a catch-all diagnoses that is over diagnosed. My son has been dx ADHD as well. Really, he’s bipolar. (my background is a psych nurse for years)

Einstein was autistic and that doesn’t fit at least 299.00 or Autistic disorder. More like Bill Gates who is asperger’s.

Engineers and mathematicians are among the highest fields of autistic people in them, some studies say 20%. (My father’s father was an engineer, his mother was a CPA so math). My mother was bipolar, her mother was a mathematician.

Here’s what we know:
Your daughter is bright
She has an incredible rote memory
conversation skills are her area of weakness
she is using some delayed echolalia

Probably she would be diagnosed as on the autistic spectrum given the above and the overdiagnoses of it.

Help? What kind of help? She doesn’t need any help. I’m fine, my father is fine, my brother (dx PDD.NOS) is fine (information tech-computers). She can talk, and the articulation will come. What you can work on with her is conversation skills. Try to get some back and forth. Playdates 1:1.

My sons all get services but they are needed. I ignore a lot of what I don’t feel fits.

Intelligence testing is inaccurate for those without enough language to complete them, and they are inaccurate before age 6. I’ve scored a 56, 147-163 (7x)

http://asplanet.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63

So here are signs of asperger’s big deal.
Aspie Adult checklist (Alyson Bradley / www.asplanet.info – Sept. 2008 / updated May 2009):
1. Over think, analyze things,2. Prefer own company, 3. Obsessional interest, 4. Like routine, 5. Like rituals, 6. Collections, 7. Sensory problems, 8. Over focus on details, 9. Perfectionist, 10. Think outside the box!, 11. Cannot understand jokes, 12. Weird laugh and/or make odd noises,13. Nervous fidget, Stim, 14. Upset by crowds, shy, 15. Face doesn’t show emotion, 16. Very honest, can seem naïve, 17. Quirky, different somehow , 18. Cannot understand point of small talk, 19. Cannot understand society unwritten rules, 20. Bullied at school, work etc., 21. Lack of friends, socializing, 22. Friends much older or younger, 23. Mumbles, speaks to self, 24. Inappropriate emotions, response, 25. Connect well with animals, 26. Computer (Mr Spock) like logic, 27. Unexplained memory lapses, 28. Irregular sleeping patterns, 29. Hopeless or expert with maps, 30. Awkward, clumsy, bad body posture….

ON the site above the AS test I score a 44/50 with a score of 32 being most likely aspergers and an average female score of 11.

ETA: Sure

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Question?: Autism Signs In 3 Year Olds

Jenny asks…

Do you think I lost my outgoing nature from autism?

I think I might have autism. Every since my 13th birthday, I lost my outgoing glow around my relatives. I’m now gloomy and shy around them and I get nervous if I made eye contact with them, I only make eye contact to people I know really good.
I’ve actually had social problems since I was 11.

admin answers:

No, absolutely not. Autism is something people are born with or develop at a very young age- it shows up when a kid is between 1-3 or 4 years old usually? If you weren’t showing signs of it before you were 13, you don’t have it.

This sounds more like normal phase/stage of shyness or maybe anxiety disorder of some kind. Are you nervous around other people besides particular relatives or do you worry about social situations or crowds or thngs like that? If you start avoiding people because of it or are just feeling nervous a lot talk to your parents or your doctor.

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Question?: Pdd

Jenny asks…

Does PDD-NOS gradually disappear as they get older?

I’ve heard from several sources that unlike other branches of autism like Aspergers, PDD-NOS can be outgrown or disappears in adult life. Can I get some input from some mental health professionals with experience with people with it? My 4 year old daughter was just diagnosed with it and she loves trains and spends most if not all of her alone time jumping and flapping her arms in a corner and talking to herself under her breath. I love her to bits. I’m just wondering if it will stay with her as she grows up. Any help will be strongly appreciated.

admin answers:

My 2.5 year old also has PDD-NOS and I was told the same thing by a pediatrician. I honestly don’t think they totally outgrow it but that because it is less severe than classic autism its possible for them to overcome a lot of the symptoms which would cause them to loose the PDD-NOS label. I do think that some things will still stay with them when they grow up but it will likely be so mild that it will be unnoticeable by anyone who doesn’t know she had been diagnosed as PDD-NOS.
Many parents are recovering their children by reversing the symptoms of autism so I do think that it could be possible to completely overcome PDD-NOS using biomedical treatment. If you want some more info on it here are some good websites
http://www.autism.com/index.asp
http://www.generationrescue.org/
http://danasview.net/
and here are some good groups where you can talk to other parents who are recovering their children
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/abmd/?yguid=243434626
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/GFCFKids/?yguid=243434626

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Treatment

Richard asks…

What is the difference between a “normal” over-active child and a child with ADHD?

Part of being a child is pushing boundaries, being full of energy, not doing what your told, and having tantrums because they haven’t learned to emotionally hide/control/repress their feelings. What is the difference between this and a child being diagnosed with ADHD? Like the spurious Aspergers Syndrome, M.E. and “personality disorders” is ADHD just another ficticious label to apply to children who don’t do what they’re told to help parents excuse their responsibility and behaviour?

admin answers:

Normal kids can control their behavior, kids with ADHD can’t and no matter how hard they try, they struggle. Normal kids are able to calm down and focus in class and get their work done while a kid with ADHD fails to get their work done so they come home with tons of homework. They also often misplace their work or items and they struggle trying to be organized. But with pills, they find it easier to focus and be more organized. There have been a few people who managed to get better at it without the medicine but that was maybe because they were borderline ADHD or mild.

ADHD is not another made up thing (nor are the other conditions you mentioned) but if you look at it another way, it is made up and so are all the other conditions. Everything needs a name so people know what to do to fix their problems or know what treatment to get, etc. Just imagine what life be like if conditions didn’t have a name. People wouldn’t know what to do about their problems and doctors wouldn’t know what pills to prescribe. People wouldn’t even know what to look up to see what they can do to help their child or themselves.
Labels don’t define anyone. You are you and people are people, not the label. The problems do exist but some are over the top like shy eating or pregnorexia. They’re real but I think the names are ridiculous. Pregnorexia is just anorexia except the woman is pregnant. Shy eating just sounds like social anxiety but they picked braches from the tree and made it a condition of its own. But Stockholm syndrome and Lima syndrome? Ridiculous even though the behavior exists but to make it a condition? Come on. I even think adjustment disorder is ridiculous even though the problems do exist and I had that condition too.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Mark asks…

rett syndrome?

Hi all>
Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I worked with a child that had RS and her parents told me she was originally diagnosed with CP. It was very difficult to tell the difference between the two.So it was drawn out. The little girl was 2 1/2 before she was properly diagnosed. One main difference between CP & RS is that with CP when you learn something you keep the knowelege and remember things, with RS you can learn it and loose it. This little girl I worked with could not walk or talk but she could feed herself with her hands and crawl a little. By the time she turned 5 she had lost everthing she had gained. She could no longer swallow her food feed herself or crawl. Her Dr had to put a G button in to do tubal feedings and then she was put in a kid cart because she couldnt get around on her own. I hope I helped but this is the only knowlege I have of RS….

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Question?: Autistic Behavior

Mark asks…

How do I make my autistic son to understand that he cannot hit himself?

Whenever my son is punished for unacceptable behavior, he goes into his room and hits himself. His autism is very mild. He is high-functioning. His behavior is his biggest obstacle. He speaks very loudly. He talks back when he is told “no.” Is there anyone that is experiencing this? Does therapy help?

admin answers:

I know exactly what you are going through. I was exactly like that as a small child, and to some extent, I still am…lol
I’m high functioning autistic as well (Asperger’s Syndrome).
Maybe you could consult a child psychologist. I was diagnosed at age 13 (I’m 16 now) by a child psychologist, and have been seeing her regularly ever since. Autism is a social difference (I despise the use of the word ‘disorder’), so autistic kids don’t see social situations as most neurotipycals (‘normal’ people) do. My psychologist has worked through various social situations with me and is helping me understand how to fit in better with society. It can help later on in life if he starts learning about proper social behaviour at an early age.
Another good site to check out is http://www.aspiesforfreedom.com
It’s a forum for all people on the autism spectrum, and for parents of autistic kids. I’ve gained a tom of great advice from people there.
Hope that helped. =]

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults

Ruth asks…

Is it common for high functioning autistic adults to live with their parents?

I have high functioning autism / aspbergers / a Pervasive Developmental Disorder. I have lived on my own and my symptoms became worse. I moved in and out with my mom – logically it seemed advantageous to both of us.

I was wondering if it’s common for autistics to be more prone to living at home – I don’t really understand it, it’s a little like a magnet.

I have trouble explaining this to others also.

admin answers:

I think that, as the other poster suggested, it has to do with routine. With your mom, you have an external schedule that determines a lot of your daily activities. If you’re on your own, you’re responsible for everything yourself. And that’s exactly something that is difficult for many autistics – all those little everyday tasks. Even if you can handle them, that’ll still demand so much of your resources that you’ll get into trouble elsewhere.
I’d suggest you check out this website: http://thiswayoflife.org/index.html There is a lot of useful information (look for Executive Dysfunction); and I guess that you can implement some strategies for yourself to get along on your own.

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