Tag Archives: Parents

Question?: Autistic Kids

Donna asks…

I have an interview to work with autistic kids, I totally dont know what2 expect, any ideas?

The interview is for 3 hours!! I don’t like not knowing what will happen in the interview. I would also appreciate any info on how to act around autistic kids, i have researched on the net but would appreciate first hand advice.
Thanks in advance! 🙂

admin answers:

I’ve done a similar interview and was given the job. I was a behavioural therapist for autistic children.

Ok so this is what happened to me.
My interview took the best part of a day. (actually it was a 2 part interview, with people who passed the first part called back for the second)

The preliminaries were covered.

They’ll ask you about your educational qualifications, previous work experience, why applied for the position. That was the easy bit.

Then in the afternoon, it was much harder. More practical based. We had to do play skills in front of the other applicants. For example we were given a simple toy (like a ball or spinning top), and told to make it appealing to the child. With the parents permission, autistic students at the school assisted in the application process so don’t be surprised if you are asked to do some real life one-on-one therapy in front others.

Goodluck xxxxxxxx

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Question?: Pdd Autism

Paul asks…

What is Autism exactly-I have an autistic sister?

I would like to understand her situation better. I don’t live with her so when ever I do see her (which is like maybe once every 5 months, if that) she’s a little hard to handle. She’s very hyper. And she’s got more problems other than just autism.

But what is autism exactly? I just want to understand my baby sister more.

admin answers:

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that begins at birth or within the first two-and-a-half years of life. Most autistic children are perfectly normal in appearance, but spend their time engaged in puzzling and disturbing behaviors which are markedly different from those of typical children. Less severe cases may be diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or with Asperger’s Syndrome (these children typically have normal speech, but they have many “autistic” social and behavioral problems).

It used to be thought that autism is just a fate that you accept.The good news is that there are now a wide variety of treatment options which can be very helpful. Some treatments may lead to great improvement, and others may have little or no effect, but a good starting point would be the parent ratings of biomedical interventions, which presents the responses of over 25,000 parents in showing the effectiveness of various interventions on their own child.

ARI’s Diagnostic Checklist, Form E-2, was developed by Dr. Bernard Rimland to diagnose children with Kanner’s syndrome (which is also known as ‘classical autism’). Many parents and professionals have also used the E-2 checklist to assist in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can print out, complete the checklist, and then mail it to ARI for scoring. Our staff will analyze the responses and send you a score along with an interpretation. The checklist is available in 17 different languages. There is no charge for this service.

How Common is it? For many years autism was rare – occurring in just five children per 10,000 live births. However, since the early 1990’s, the rate of autism has increased exponentially around the world with figures as high as 60 per 10,000. Boys outnumber girls four to one. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control reported that 1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism.

What is the Outlook? Age at intervention has a direct impact on outcome–typically, the earlier a child is treated, the better the prognosis will be. In recent years there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children who can attend school in a typical classroom and live semi-independently in community settings. However, the majority of autistic persons remain impaired in their ability to communicate and socialize.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Teenager

Mary asks…

I’m scared to go in public. I’m only 14 years old. What will life be like later life?

Couple years ago i started year 7. (Im Autistic btw) Everytime there was an argument or some b*tchy girl was being mean i felt like punching them in the face. Don’t we all? But then it got worse, whenever i felt sad I wanted to hurt someone, I didn’t want to though. I vivdly remember going to y dads and playing with my little brothers (3 and 5 at the time) The older one was jumping around the round screaming and wooping. He is very energetic and bouncy. I got stressed from the noise and i picked him up. I wanted to throw him but i just gained control and put him down on the armchair. I said”Angus, you need to calm down now. I am very tired ok?” he said ok and ran off to play sandcastles with Monty the younger one. I felt horrified about thinking such a thing. I do still have moments now but I am 100% in control. I only think thoughts rarely but i never do anything. very rare happen now but I do still have problems. I am scared of loud noises which i do sometimes find disturbing and therefore i do not like crowds. If I’m alone for a moment I freak out turning all the lights on and turning on TV’s to make it think there’s someone in the house. I feel there are ghostlike people in our house and the only place that is safe is with someone or in my bedroom. Sometimes I’ll want to cry for no reason, yet im not depressed.

Because of all these problems I’m scared of setting foot outside alone now. I could walk all the way to the shops before high school, now i can’t go anywhere. I accept the fatc that “im just 14” but what about in later life? Im autistic remember so these problems may never go away. I don’t want to do counselling, it didn’t work before.

admin answers:

Maybe you should try talking to someone you trust like your parents or a teacher? They could help you see that there really is nothing to be afraid of. I’m a teenager and I’m not autistic or anything but I know when I have a problem or something it helps to talk it through.
You said counselling didn’t work for you, well maybe you could try a different counsellor, as not everyone clicks with certain people.
It’s really great that you have learned to control yourself in the situations where you feel angry and violent, but you should definitely talk to someone you trust about this, because you never know when one day it could go too far and someone could get hurt, including you.

I wish you all the best xxx

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

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Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

Robert asks…

Parents of Older Autistic Children w/ Aggression?

I have been using Safe Crisis Management holds for my son’s aggressive “outbursts” since he was diagnosed (PDDNOS). I have been having some problems lately due to the fact he’s getting bigger and is very flexible.

Earlier today Austins in-home therapist pushed him a bit to far and he lost it. Once I got him in the hold he began to wiggle and fight. He threw his head back and managed to bust my lip a bit and when I tried to steady his head he turned and bit my arm leaving a decent little bruise.

I was calm through it all, and finally managed to get him calmed down. But once he went back to his therapist and my husband got home, I locked myself in the bathroom and seriously considered pulling my hair out LOL. I asked his therapist for advice, but he was no help at all.

Did you have this problem when your child got older? If they were able to overpower the holds, what did you do to keep them from harming themselves/others?
No judging my son, especially if you have no experience with children on the spectrum. He is the sweetest kid on the planet 90% of the time. He just has trouble expressing his “bad moods”.
Erin: I hope it works out with your son. I’ve been through the pre-diagnosis phase, it’s rough. Austin is 8 now, and generally his episodes will send him “after people”. He won’t really sit still through it.

admin answers:

Well, my son is 2 1/2 years old, and not yet been diagnosed with autism, but we believe he has it. He has the same outbursts that you describe your son to have. I have tried holds as well, but all it does is hurt us both. I really don’t have that great of an answer for you, but I do know that you need to keep yourself safe as well as your son. My son will usually stop when he wants to, and I’ve found that the holds just made him angrier. What I do may sound terrible, but it’s the best way I’ve found so far. I have a big, soft chair that I set him in and just let him go. He can’t really hurt himself on this chair, it’s very soft and it’s over-sized. Maybe try something like that, just let the outburst run its course, while making sure he stays safe and doesn’t hurt himself. To me, it’s better than you getting a busted nose or something, and then not being able to help him through is problem because you have something you need to tend to on yourself.

Good luck, if you find any better advice, let me know.

Edit: I am really sorry to hear that. Nick’s a little bit the same way, until I sit him down and let him go at it in his chair. He’ll come hit and kick and bite me, hit his little brother, and the works. Plus, he beats himself up something fierce. I don’t have any better advice for you, but I think, if that therapist saw it, he should have been of more help. Maybe you should get another therapist? I don’t know, but I think they should be able to help with that.

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Question?: Angry Autistic Child

William asks…

How do you deal with temper tantrums from a 3 yr old boy who could be autistic?

Pulling hair, biting, pushing…with no anger expression in his face…usually smiling or laughing when he does it..its like he gets in a zone of his own world running around the room followed by a few violent acts like that then he calms down..

I babysit this child by the way…

admin answers:

First ask the parents what they do. One hopes they have visuals, pictures and a plan – you need to know that plan. If they are clueless – and are hoping it will just stop – please encourage them to seek assistance from their local school district if they are in the US.

In general – you need to be alert enough to catch the child BEFORE they implode. Maybe their face gets different or it’s about a particular thing. If you can change the activity before the anger that might help. The more angry he is the less he will be able to process any words. If there is something he likes – Sponge Bob or Lego’s etc. Have a picture handy and show him to redirect to something appealing and of high interest.

The bottom line though is that the family needs some help.

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Question?: Adhd In Children

Nancy asks…

What will happen to a boy with ADHD if his parents ignore it and always blame him for daydreaming?

in school and acting wild and not having any friends (since no one wants to be friends with an ADHD child.) or getiing summer jobs or jobs on the weekends or after school.

And the school doesn’t care and just promote the students at the end of the year no matter what their academic achievements are.

ADHD attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

What kind of emotional scars will such a child have.
What kind of an adult will this child turn out to be?

admin answers:

He would probably stop trying because no matter how hard he tries his parents will constantly tell him that he’s stupid and that his low grades are proof of it even though he tries really hard to focus on what the teacher said. That’s what happened with me.

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Question?: What Is Autism Yahoo

Maria asks…

Looking for parents who have recovering children from autism ?

I’m looking for other parents who have went through recovering thier child from autism any help is greatly appreciated. Also, if any parents are in phx, arizona that would help a lot with any local sources out here thanks.

admin answers:

YES, children can and have recovered! To Duck, sorry if you choose to be bugged by that statement, but it is true. While I agree with Duck that “You can only do your best with what your given”, part of what your given are other’s who have gone before you and come out the other side. I’ve met several kids who have recovered. I don’t know what their brain scans look like, but by standard diagnostic Autism testing (e.g., ADOS-WS), they appear nowhere on the autism spectrum. Here is a link to some wonderful free archived web seminars:
http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/webinar/index.php
Note: Raun Kaufman who recovered in the 1970’s is on this. Brian Nelson who’s son recovered is on this. Also, William Hogan who’s daughter recovered is on this. Jade Hogan’s Recovery Video: http://video.yahoo.com/watch/109310/1702951 21 minute video spans from on-set (solitary life) to recovery (talking on the phone, playing T-Ball, etc.)

Oprah Winfrey and Richard Sher on “People Are Talking” {from 1981} interviewed Barry Neil Kaufman on how he helped his child, Raun, recover from Autism. They discuss the importance of never giving up hope. The Kaufmans later went on to found the Autism Treatment Center of America where their son Raun, recovered from Autism, is now the CEO. If the Kaufmans had listen to the many doctors that they consulted, Raun would be in an institution right now…instead, Raun has been one of the best teachers that I have ever had.

Clip 1 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8uJ5RpQWw0

Clip 2 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QshJhrPBPHM

Clip 3 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmsrBoqoh8I

Clip 4 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwKzM64rTJY

For about 3 years, our daughter who has autism was in special needs preschool with ABA with PECS. This did not work for her. Two years ago we started Son-Rise as our relationship based teaching modality. Within the first 5 months, her 3-hour tantrums were gone; she was potty trained, her eye contact had grown exponentially, she started speaking some sentences, and best of all, she was happy!

We have also started complementary bio medical interventions with even further results. Recovery is possible, and dramatic improvement is fairly commonplace amongst other Son-Rise parents that I have talked to. You may want to check out Jonathan Levy’s book, What You Can Do Right Now to Help Your Child With Autism (http://www.amazon.com/What-Right-Help-Child-Autism/dp/1402209185/ref=sr_1_1/103-7291337-5129403?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179939405&sr=8-1).
We LOVE this book!!!
Remember to trust yourself…not just doctors and therapists. Often their ASD training is limited and you have a PhD in knowing your child.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Adults

Chris asks…

Society is concerned with children who have Autism, but is there not enough attention to children whose parent?

or parents might have Autism? Would this greatly affect the children’s upbringing, if a parent had Autism, which was undiagnosed, and caused them to act strangely

admin answers:

Society does not pay enough attention to adults with autism, period. Adults with autism are a forgotten and underserved group, as if people think autistic individuals grow out of it or disappear from the surface of earth when they reach adulthood. Diagnosis, treatment, research, articles, educational material etc. Is pretty much all focused on children with autism and their parents.

Many autistic adults are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed and some have been diagnosed in adulthood but still have nowhere to turn for help.

Some of those adults have children and some of them do not. Some of those who are parents have done a good job raising their kids, with or without support from others, and some have not been able to handle it as well. Autism varies so much between individuals that the upbringing by parents with autism varies a lot too. I know a few (diagnosed) adults with high functioning autism who have children and are doing a fine job raising them. I’m sure that there exist others who don’t deal with it as well though and I’m not sure what (if anything) is being done about that.

While the upbringing of children whose parents have autism may not necessarily be affected in a negative way, I do think society should pay more attention to it and be more prepared and willing to help if necessary. I think there is need for more supportive services for adults with autism, both those who are parents and those who are not.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Sandy asks…

rett syndrome-please help!?

Hi all> I asked this question before but didnt get any responses

Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I never had it but wanted to help. This is what my research came up with,
Stage I, called early onset, generally begins between 6 and 18 months of age. Quite frequently, this stage is overlooked because symptoms of the disorder may be somewhat vague, and parents and doctors may not notice the subtle slowing of development at first. The infant may begin to show less eye contact and have reduced interest in toys. There may be delays in gross motor skills such as sitting or crawling. Hand-wringing and decreasing head growth may occur, but not enough to draw attention. This stage usually lasts for a few months but can persist for more than a year.

Stage II, or the rapid destructive stage, usually begins between ages 1 and 4 and may last for weeks or months. This stage may have either a rapid or a gradual onset as purposeful hand skills and spoken language are lost. The characteristic hand movements begin to emerge during this stage and often include wringing, washing, clapping, or tapping, as well as repeatedly moving the hands to the mouth. Hands are sometimes clasped behind the back or held at the sides, with random touching, grasping, and releasing. The movements persist while the child is awake but disappear during sleep. Breathing irregularities such as episodes of apnea and hyperventilation may occur, although breathing is usually normal during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss of social interaction and communication. General irritability and sleep irregularities may be seen. Gait patterns are unsteady and initiating motor movements can be difficult. Slowing of head growth is usually noticed during this stage.

Stage III, also called the plateau or pseudo-stationary stage, usually begins between ages 2 and 10 and can last for years. Apraxia, motor problems, and seizures are prominent during this stage. However, there may be improvement in behavior, with less irritability, crying, and autistic-like features. An individual in stage III may show more interest in her surroundings, and her alertness, attention span, and communication skills may improve. Many girls remain in this stage for most of their lives.

The last stage, stage IV — called the late motor deterioration stage — can last for years or decades and is characterized by reduced mobility. Muscle weakness, rigidity (stiffness), spasticity, dystonia (increased muscle tone with abnormal posturing of extremity or trunk), and scoliosis (curvature of the spine) are other prominent features. Girls who were previously able to walk may stop walking. Generally, there is no decline in cognition, communication, or hand skills in stage IV. Repetitive hand movements may decrease, and eye gaze usually improves.

Hope it helps.

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