Tag Archives: Medication

Question?: Schizophrenia Medication

Laura asks…

Is schizophrenia managable without medication or therapy?

My Girlfriend has Schizophrenia, she says she will never take medication for it or go get therapy. (her dad has convinced her that medications are not for mental illness) As for therapy, she doesn’t want to pay for it. Apparently she has had something telling her to hurt ME a couple times before. I love her very much but I don’t want to live the rest of my life worrying about my safety. Is it possible to control the symptoms without medication or therapy?

admin answers:

Sorry, but diet and exercise aren’t usually effective for controlling mental illness. Unless there is an “alternative” treatment that would be effective (do some research) then no…her illness cannot be controlled by doing nothing.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Asperger Syndrome Causes

Chris asks…

Is the recognition of personality and neurotic disorders a good or bad thing?

I understand that its beneficial for people who need medication. The reason I ask is that my Mum reads a lot of psychology books and has a very good understanding of various psychomatic ailments, but I think because she knows so much about such illnesses and disorders she has tried to “label” me and my siblings in a sort of “psychological hyprochondriac” kind of way. I was diagnosed with depression and as having Aspergers syndrome when I was 10 and I think the Seroxat I was on for ten years may have caused further problems. Also, my brother is 9 and she has successfully had him diagnosed for Aspergers Syndrome and Attention Deficity Hyperactivity Disorder – as far as I’m concerned has is a perfectly normal 9 year old. I’m just worried that my brother will grow up into the personality that she’s labelled him as like I did.
I am being ungrateful for my Mum’s help or do you think ignorance can be bliss with these sort of things?

admin answers:

The problem you’re describing is not with recognition of disorders, but their misdiagnosis.

That is, it’s a very good thing to be able to recognize disorders. Seeing them where they don’t exist, not so good, in fact, as you suggest, it can be harmful.

It’s not that ignorance is bliss, it’s that a little knowledge can be dangerous — that is, when it isn’t really knowledge, but is information being misapplied.

Wish I had some advice for you, but I really don’t know what to say.

I’m surprised that the people she took your brother to, who agreed with her “diagnosis” did so. I hope they know what they’re doing.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Disorder

David asks…

Autism reported to get worse with a patient?

I have been talking to care staff that work with an autistic man, who is siad to be getting worse autistically.

The mans mother claims that in the past, he was able to ride a bike, go out for walks, run, play and so on when he was a child.

However, his mother claims that it is because he is on medication today and that this is why his behaviour has got worse with time.
She would like him to come off medication.

His dose of medication has been reduced, but not much of a behaviour difference has been observed by the staff.

As I understand it, AS and Autistic disorder remains unchanged in its magniture through out life. But there are variables that can make its effects more or less noticable, such as adolescence and becoming an adult.

In many cases, as such people grow to become adults, I hear reports of a decline in such behaviour.

Can this condition become more or less severe in terms of brain structural damage?
If so, why?

admin answers:

Autism is not caused as a result of brain damage. Scientists are still trying to make a determination of cause, but they think it is probably a genetic predisposition triggered by environmental factors. There are degrees of severity. Many people on the autism spectrum are not mentally retarded. However deficits in communication and social skills make it seem as if they are developmentally challenged.

In my career as a special education teacher, I have observed that puberty DOES present behavior challenges to people on the autism spectrum. But then again, been around any typical kids going through puberty lately? *grin* Puberty can adversely effect the best of us. The issue is just compounded when the person has severe expressive and receptive communication problems.

Some questions you may want to ask are:
Does this person have preferred activities (puzzles, movies, lining up books, etc.)? If so, are these activities built into his daily schedule? Does he have a visual schedule over which he has some control (during a free time activity period, can he choose from 2 or 3 different things)? During his day, does he participate in meaningful age appropriate activities (helping pick up trays, sweeping the floor, straightening books or magazines, etc.)? A visual prompt system may be necessary for his participation in meaningful activities, such as a sequence of pictures showing scattered magazines, then hands picking up those magazines, then a neat stack of magazines.

Basically, any person, no matter their disability level, needs to have scheduled periods of useful activities interspersed with fun activities throughout their day. The challenge is two-fold: finding something useful they can do successfully, and discovering what it is that they consider ‘fun’.

Thanks for being concerned and willing to help a fellow human being. Good luck and best wishes!

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Angry Autistic Kids

Laura asks…

Does Baby Always Have Problems When Mother Does Drugs?

Have you ever known anyone who did drugs during their pregnancy. and what was the out come for the baby. I know the baby can have a lot of problems. but was wondering if this is always the case. is it possible for mother to do drugs, and baby turns out fine. just curious.

admin answers:

It is very possible for the baby to turn out fine, it actually happens a lot. I know many people that have done drugs during their pregnancy and their children are completely normal/healthy. I also know people that did drugs during their pregnancy and their babies are not completely normal/healthy. One of my friends (kind of a friend…more like family friend) did opiates, suboxone, and was prescribed subutex during her pregnancy with her son and he is now a few months away from turning three and only says four words. She refuses to get him checked for developmental problems and speech problems but I’m like 98% sure that he is autistic. He is very violent towards animals, gets very angry over little things and won’t give up on things like a normal kid would (i.e- he was playing with this model car that had two seats in the front with doors that opened and he was putting mighty beans into the seats but was getting VERY angry because only two mighty beans would fit….he spent like 15 minutes trying to fit more mighty beans into that car and would have continued to try if I hadn’t taken it away from him. The poor kid was clenching his fists and huffing and puffing over something that a normal kid his age wouldn’t have cared about after the first or second try!), he is also very smart and remembers EVERYTHING but won’t talk no matter how much you try and make him. If you are addicted to drugs, there are programs out there for pregnant women that will help you safely get off of them or they will put you on a maintenance medication like subutex or methadone. I’m talking more along the lines of opiates and pills and stuff. Meth and coke are a totally different story and you rarely hear about a baby coming out even close to healthy when the mother does either of those drugs during her pregnancy.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia In Children

Robert asks…

Could me and my fiance still have children if he has schizophrenia?

Someone told me that because my fiance is schizophrenic we would have any children we had taken off us. He went through a bad patch 3 years ago and got into trouble with the police, he went on to medication and had intense physiatric help. When we got together he became a lot calmer and he hasn’t had an episode since, he has been off medication for awhile now. So would this effect us in the future when we decide to have children?
Thanks

admin answers:

If there is one parent who is competent at all times, and if the parent with schizophrenia has a meltdown, the other spouse was sure to take care of that child at all times, there is no reason for the state to intervene. The issues come up when the child is neglected or otherwise at risk. Most people with schizophrenia are never violent (that’s substance abuse plus mental illness that can increase violence) so the diagnosis alone would rarely be used to take a child away, and in those cases, that’s probably illegal, but the person with schizophrenia cannot afford a good lawyer.

You know, a one time bad patch with psychosis doesn’t mean a person has schizophrenia. It used to be said that a person would have a nervous breakdown, and it was well known that the person would recover and be fine. Nowadays, everybody assumes if a person got psychosis, that they are mentally ill for life and better take their pills. Not true!

Schizophrenia is not particularly genetic. Maybe a little, but not strongly so.

I hope he is in therapy and learning coping skills and stress reduction, to reduce the risk of further break downs.

Good luck!

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Disorder

John asks…

Autism reported to get worse with a patient?

I have been talking to care staff that work with an autistic man, who is siad to be getting worse autistically.

The mans mother claims that in the past, he was able to ride a bike, go out for walks, run, play and so on when he was a child.

However, his mother claims that it is because he is on medication today and that this is why his behaviour has got worse with time.
She would like him to come off medication.

His dose of medication has been reduced, but not much of a behaviour difference has been observed by the staff.

As I understand it, AS and Autistic disorder remains unchanged in its magniture through out life. But there are variables that can make its effects more or less noticable, such as adolescence and becoming an adult.

In many cases, as such people grow to become adults, I hear reports of a decline in such behaviour.

Can this condition become more or less severe in terms of brain structural damage?
If so, why?

admin answers:

Cosmic… The question wasn’t regarding a child, but an autistic MAN who, I’m assuming, is in a group home.

You didn’t state if this is a new medication or he’s been on it awhile. If it’s a fairly new med, first of all why is he on it? Second, maybe it needs to be lowered more? Or, a different one tried. All of these can affect change in any individual,so they really need to be thought about for the individual, not just as the group as a whole. Asperger’s and autism CAN and often do change throughout the person’s life, depending on what is being done with that person. As they mature, they can learn to live with it better, some even covering it up better. But because it affects them socially and emotionally, the way it affects them can change depending on their situations. For my son, I notice changes in him if he’s sick or getting sick, too tired, hasn’t been stimulated enough sensorily, or he’s been over-stimulated. Those are just a few of the things that bring about temporary change. Long-term changes can be (in terms of improving) brought about through working with the individual, helping them learn self-control, etc. Problem is, as an adult, they’re usually not as open to change and won’t cooperate with it, so typically there is ‘less’ change when they hit adulthood. Now, in terms of regression, what is his day like? Is anyone trying to stimulate him, or engage him in his world, or are they just leaving it up to him? He might be going through a rough spot like we all do, not feeling motivated enough to do the things he was doing. If that came about after starting the meds, I would say his mom is right. So, really you have to look at the things leading up to his regression, what is being done to try to help him out of it, and how responsive he is. Maybe his mom could try getting him to do these things. Really, even though he’s autistic you’re still dealing with an individual personality who is going to have ups and downs. It’s just that with autism, they’re usually much more pronounced, more severe. In terms of brain structural damage, what has he been exposed to? I’ve seen with my son that changes in diets, changes in chemicals that he’s exposed to, will drastically affect him. Check to see if the cleaners used to clean around the facility have been changed or increased in the amounts being used. Maybe a new employee is using too much of something, and that’s affecting his ability to function. I realize this isn’t actually structural damage, but these things drastically affect how they function, their ability to process.
Hopefully this gives you some different things to look at to find the culprit. I’m hoping this facility is respecting the mom’s wishes, though, if the only deciding factor ends up being the meds?

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia Medication

Chris asks…

What happens if i take schizophrenia medication when im not schizophrenic?

Kay so i smoke weed and im still a teen, from wut i read weed can cause a temporary mild case in sum youths, so i went went to see a doc and he prescribed me schiz meds cause i didnt tell him i smoke. wut would happen if im not schizophrenic?

admin answers:

Nothing

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Adhd Medications

Ken asks…

Is there a way I can get cheap ADHD medication without insurance?

Right now, I don’t have insurance and I can’t afford it. Not only that, but I also have ADHD. I’m really trying to bring it under control, but it’s very hard. Is there any way I can get cheap ADHD medication without insurance?

admin answers:

Partnership for Prescription Assistance lists initiatives sponsored by drug manufacturers and by government and local organizations to help uninsured people with medication costs. See the link below.

Your doctor may be able to help with samples, but that won’t last you long.

Most ADHD meds are stimulants, so it may help to “self-medicate” with caffeinated products like coffee or coke. Obviously this isn’t a long-term solution, but it may help you ride out the bumpy times.

P.s. I had already checked the Walmart site and didn’t see any of the typical ADHD meds listed.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Adults

Joseph asks…

Is anyone with autism on medication trying to reduce the learning problems?

To you autistic adults out there, do you take any medication to reduce your learning problems. And to the parents of autistic children, do you give them any medication to try reduce their learning problems?

admin answers:

I’m not an adult, but close enough to one to be able to answer your question. I’m planning on going on some medience because of my anxiety/depression, which is really not lighting up on me, and it’s been two years. I don’t have any learning probelms persay though, so I can’t really take any. I found that resipodal was really helpful when it came to giving me more attention, and it didn’t make me feel drugged out. It has a couple side-effects (like low blood pressure), but if you have a low dosage, you shouldn’t have it as much
I have to go to school now, but I hope this helps.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Adhd Symptoms

David asks…

If my little guy start taking meds for ADHD but hi TS tics still remain, what are the options?

Both my son and I have adhd symptoms (he’s diagnosed but I’m not). We both have tics and the people who diagnosed him said that this was just the ADHD but I do not think so. I was not too impulsive as a child yet I had tics, and my boy can call out something or screech even when he is in a relatively calm state (so it is not about regulating states of mind as I am told the cause is).

Any how, I am not getting excited about the prospect of giving him medication as I am not sure it will affect the tics and I wonder If they will be more noticeable then.
For example, he is happy being daft an making silly noises but he finds it easier to play the fool as he doesn’t have to explain outbursts. When he has to be sensible or is feeling sensible and something pops out he smiles and apologizes but in quite a shy way and sometimes looks embarrassed.

I would honestly let him keep being the class clown rather than him feel embarrassed. But are there other options that can work for TS and ADHD together?

admin answers:

I am not in favor of giving children medicine if there is any other options. I too would think that his problem is more likely explained by the TS and yes, the medicines can cause the Tics.

I would go for a second opinion, either from a psychiatrist or neurologists that has a reputation for dealing with children and TS. It may still mean he needs a medication, but maybe there is a more appropriate one.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers