Tag Archives: Little Sister

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Thomas asks…

Could my little sister have a mild form of autism?Any advice or tips?

My little sister is 3 years old and screams alot for stupid little things that may happen.Some of her behavior makes me concerned that she may have a mild form of autism.She’s very smart for her age though.

admin answers:

Most children with autism are VERY smart for their age and have a HIGH physical abilities! My four year old son is autistic. I would like to also add after reading some of the other answers just now that there ARE different levels of autism. Some are higher functioning than others, and MR does NOT always go hand in hand with autism.

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Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism Spectrum Disorders, or ASD, are a group of developmental disabilities characterized by abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and the presence of repetitive behaviors or restricted interests. Some professionals may use the term Pervasive Developmental Disorders, or PDD, instead of ASD.

Incidence
ASD or PDD occurs 4 to 5 times more often in boys than in girls. Symptoms are present before the age of three, although diagnosis may occur later. ASD affects individuals from all racial, ethnic, and social backgrounds.

Cause
Nobody knows what causes ASD. Scientists believe that there are chemical and biological differences in how the brain functions, and there may be genetic factors involved. Parents do not cause autism spectrum disorders. No factors in a child’s experience or in parenting styles are responsible for ASD.

Prognosis
ASD is a lifelong disability, but with intensive and early intervention, individuals with ASD can and do make excellent progress and improve their quality of life. While there is no known cure for ASD, there are many intervention strategies designed to address the problems associated with ASD.

Characteristics
Although difficulties in social interaction, communication, and restricted or repetitive behavior are general characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders, the specific diagnoses are distinguished by the types, numbers, and severity of symptoms.
Communication
Some children develop speech, and then regress, or lose communication skills. Others echo or repeat what they hear. Many individuals with ASD do learn to talk, while others rely on technology, sign, or pictures to communicate. However, conversational skills, gestures, and non-verbal communication strategies remain difficult for most individuals with ASD.
Social Interaction
Persons with ASD often have difficulty interacting with others, learning to play with peers, and developing friendships, even though some may be very interested in having friends. They often have difficulty using and understanding eye contact, facial expressions, and social rules. They can be unaware of the interests and perspectives of other people, and may, therefore, become socially isolated and misunderstood.
Interests and Behavior
Some persons with autism may engage in repetitive behavior, like switching a light on and off, spinning, or rocking. Some may play with toys in an unusual manner, like lining toy cars up instead of pretending to drive them. They may insist on doing the same thing in the same way, and may have difficulty with changes to their surroundings or routines. Individuals with ASD also have difficulty processing information from their senses. For example, they may dislike the feel of certain fabrics or the texture of certain foods. Some individuals are very active and have difficulty with sleep. Some engage in challenging behavior, such as aggression, self-injury, or severe withdrawal.

Types
Neither ASD nor PDD are specific diagnoses. The specific ASD/PDD diagnoses are: Autism, Asperger Syndrome (AS), Rett’s Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). These specific diagnoses are considered “Spectrum disorders” because the severity of impairment varies from person to person and can change over time as a result of intervention. Because it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint the exact diagnosis, some professionals may refer to individuals as being “on the spectrum”. For example, one child with ASD may struggle to learn to use words to communicate while another may be capable of carrying on a long conversation, but will only care to talk about certain topics. Many show a strong aptitude in one area, while remaining weak in others.
Autism
Autism is the most well-known form of ASD. Often the most noteworthy piece of this diagnosis is a sever impairment in social skills, People with autism may prefer to play or work alone, and seek social interaction only as needed. Autism can occur with or without mental retardation or other health problems, such as seizure disorders. The first signs of autism usually are recognized during the second year of life, and may include odd, delayed, or absent speech development.
Asperger Syndrome
Asperger Syndrome (AS) is marked by significant difficulties in social interaction but in contrast to autism, there are no obvious delays in the development of speech. However, individuals often have more subtle problems with language and non-verbal communication. Persons with AS are likely to have average to above average intelligence, yet may have difficulty functioning in traditional school and work environments. A unique characteristic that many AS individuals show is an intense interest in one or two subjects to the exclusion of others. When speaking, these individuals tend to be formal, and they may not be skilled at conversational turn taking. Individuals with AS are typically diagnosed later than individuals with autism.
PDD-NOS
PDD-NOS is an abbreviation for Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified. The diagnosis of PDD-NOS is usually given to an individual who does not meet the exact diagnostic criteria for any of the other diagnoses in ASD, yet clearly shows unusual development in social interaction, communication skills or interests, and behavior. Often, individuals with PDD-NOS diagnosis have better social or communication skills than individuals diagnosed with autism and may have fewer problems with repetitive behaviors or restricted interests.

Taken from CARD’s “A Map for Your Journey”

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“SPEAK UP LOUD FOR THOSE WHO CANNOT”
Today 80% of the Autism population is under 18.

In 2005, The Center For Disease Control announces that autism is the fastest growing serious developmental disability in the United States. In 2005 estimated that 1.77 million Americans are affected by autism. In real terms the estimated autistic population of 1 million plus cases in 2004 could reach 5 to 25 million by 2015. In 1994 the autism rate was rare and was estimated to be 1 in 10,000. In 2004 the autism epidemic revised rate was estimated to be 1 in 200. In 2005 the autism epidemic revised rate is now estimated to be 1 in 166 by the Center For Disease Control. In 2015 the statistics indicate the estimated rate could be as high as 1 in 7, if this 1994 to 2004 exponential growth rate continues at its present rate.

Therefore no matter who you are or where you live, Democrat or Republican, if these statistics of the past carry forward through the next decade; your family may be devastated by autism in the next decade… The current autism epidemic could become the most devastating epidemic in history, with 10-15% of the population afflicted in the next decade that need long term care. Many experts associate a genetic predisposition triggered be high levels of mercury in the environment together as the cause of Autism.

The latest study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 12 American women of childbearing age has mercury levels in her blood above the levels considered safe for the developing fetus. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency experts have estimated that 630,000 infants are born every year with unsafe levels of mercury.

These higher mercury levels in the mothers body can be passed on during pregnancy. These 1 in 12 mothers could be unknowingly predisposing their unborn child to become autistic due to high levels of mercury passed on from the mother during pregnancy. It is now recommended that pregnant women not eat tuna fish, which is known to be high in mercury. Even small trace amounts of Mercury are known to be harmful to developing fetuses and never break down in the body. Mercury vapors can remain airborne for a year. These vapors can therefore travel around the world and we could be accumulating mercury in our bodies by inhaling them that over time.

According to a recent study of mercury emissions throughout the world. Coal fueled power plants in the U.S. Emit 48 tons of toxic mercury vapors into the air per year. China emits 1000 tons of toxic mercury vapors per year. The toxicity buildup of breathing these vapors along with mercury fillings over a period of decades within our bodies, may be the cause of the high levels mercury in women of childbearing age. Vaccines with mercury further spike an already high level of mercury passed on from the mother during pregnancy at a critical time in the infants development Vaccines with mercury may be the trigger that causes autism in children with a genetic predisposition for autism and an already high level of mercury passed on from the mother.

Acute mercury poisoning and Autism share many similar symptoms. Women who are pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant should now consider have their blood tested for elevated levels of mercury. We must ask the government to make Autism Awareness and prevention a national priority. Those who are saying that the numbers were under represented in the past are burying their heads in the sand.

“Houston, we have a problem”, we are going to have the next generation devastated by this disease if left unchecked at its present growth rate. This epidemic must quickly become the major health initiative of our time just as the search for the cure for aids has. Otherwise the effects on the next generation, families, businesses and the economy will be catastrophic. We can no longer wait for this “simmering modern day plague of the 21st century” to arrive at our doorstep in the form of a lost generation of innocent, helpless, unsuspecting children that through no fault of their own will need a lifetime of care.

Autism Awareness is Key

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Pictures

Mandy asks…

I need to know more about autism, my little sister who i never see?

Ok, im 16 and my little sister Lexie lives with her real mom , we both have the same dad but different moms. I havent seen her since she was like 3 or 4 and shes now 8. shes very tiny and underdeveloped, but adorable., her mom told me she has learning disabilities and mild autism, i was gonna see if she would let Lexie come stay with me for a week so i can get to know her, but i just wonder how shes like.
any info??

admin answers:

My son has PDD-NOS which is on the Autism Spectrum. The Autism Spectrum is what they call a Spectrum because the severity and symptoms that children have differs greatly. There are five diagnoses that are under the Autism Spectrum Umbrella. These are Autism, PDD-NOS, Asperger’s, childhood disintegrative disorder, and Rett syndrome. PDD-NOS is the most common diagnoses. Asperger’s is the highest functioning of the Autism Spectrum Disorders which are also called Pervasive Development Disorders. Autism is more common in boys than girls, except for Rett Syndrome which affects mostly girls. I have been told by specialists that they have a saying that “If you have seen one child with Autism you have seen one child with Autism”. By that saying they mean that no two children with autism present the same.

Let me tell you a little about my son. When he was a baby I knew something was different. He was my third child so I just knew something was not right. He did not like to be held like my other kids did. He would let me feed him, but look at the ceiling fan while I did instead of into my eyes. When he was done eating he would want to get down. He did not like to be held much. As he got older I noticed that he did not play with toys like my other kids did. He liked to take them apart instead. He was a head banger and rocked side to side alot. When routines changed he always got very irritable and still does. He would play with his toys the same way all the time, and line them up. He began talking on time, but always talked about what he was thinking without holding proper conversations. His voice is monotone all in one high pitch. He does not understand others feelings, how his actions affect others, or facial expressions. He takes everything very seriously and does not understand sarcasm or jokes. He has high anxiety, gets frustrated easily, and has been agressive since he was two. He has sensory processing disorder which is very common with PDD. He has always had sensory issues and hated things too bright, too cold or hot, certain clothing, certain textures, etc. He has problems making friends, and does not play age appropriately.

What has worked for us: My son gets Sensory Integration therapy at his school where he has an IEP and is in a special classroom. He has been in counseling since he was three to help him understand his feelings, others feelings, and ways to better control his emotions. He is on medications to help him control his rages, anger, and sleep issues. I have found that schedules and routines are the most important things for us. I made him a picture schedule that works very well. If you want to email me I can send you more information and even pics of our picture schedule. I have gotten valuable information by getting my son several diagnostic tests such as a speeech evaluation, neuropsycological evaluation, Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician Evaluation, an EEG, an EKG, and even genetics testing. I think that the two most important things to do are to see a Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician because they are the doctors that most specialize in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Also a neuropsych evaluation will help understand how she thinks and how her brain works.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults

Betty asks…

What are the differences between mental retardation and autism?

My little sister is diagnosed to both autism and mental retardation but I thought it was basically the same thing. I thought mental retardation IS autism. Can someone explain to me the difference?

admin answers:

In the most basic way, mental retardation is being “behind”, or retarded in mental ability in relation to persons of the same age. It ranges from persons who are just noticeably slower, through those who as adults need assistance like children, to those who must be totally cared for. Autism refers more to limitations in ability to relate and communicate with others, a “difference” or a “distance” from others who try to interact, yet not mentally ill in the sense of having apparent delusions, hallucinations, or other psychotic symptoms. Autism is more perplexing, and not uncontroversial in several ways.

I would suggest you ask for some time to talk with the Doctor or his or her team that are trying to help your sister. If you’re lucky enough to have parents who care, let them know this is an issue for you, too.

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Question?: Autistic Definition

Lizzie asks…

Why are there so many autistic kids nowadays?

I know a mother who has 2 autistic children, boy and girl. There’s also a lot of autistic kids in my little sister’s school. Is there a reason why? I know the definition of autism is more open now but I don’t think that’s the reason. Why would someone have 2 different children and both have autism?

admin answers:

As far as I’m aware, nobody really knows. If I had to guess I would put my money on a combination of these factors:

– More kids get diagnosed as the definition of autism changes to include a wider group of people who would previously not have been diagnosed
– More kids get diagnosed as we become better at identifying signs of autism
– Environmental factors like pollution or chemicals in our food
– IVF, which allows people who otherwise wouldn’t have had biological children to have them (sorry to say folks but if you can’t get pregnant naturally, maybe that’s a sign that you shouldn’t either)
– More people have kids later in life (folks, eggs and sperm don’t stay perfect as you age)
– More people self-diagnosing their kids through the internet. In such cases, the kids may or may not ACTUALLY have autism, but they are presented to others as having it.

The previous “research” indicating that vaccines cause autism has been debunked and the doctor who conducted the “research” has been outed as a fraud. In addition, research in places like Japan has shown that even changing the ingredients in vaccines doesn’t seem to have an impact on the number of autism cases.

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everything

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My girl will undoubtedly face ignorance as she steps further into the world. When she does, I want her armed with an impenetrable wall of self-esteem. Of belief that just as there are serious challenges in her autism, there are also gifts – her incredible memory, her uncanny ability to repeat what she’s heard or read, her pitch-perfect imitation of accents – and so much more we will have the joy of watching emerge as she grows.
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When someone spits ‘autism’ at her as a dirty word, I want her to turn it back on them, framed as her own. “Yes, I’m autistic. So? I’m damn proud of it.’” Heck, she could even throw in, ‘I’m sorry that you’re not, but that’s not my problem,” for good measure.

~ Person First, Diary, July, 2012

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Yesterday, one of my dearest friends shared a story. Well, maybe calling it a story is a bit grandiose. It was really just a moment in time. A tiny sliver of a conversation between her girls.

But well, as we all know around here, sometimes the smallest moments – the ones that may look quite ordinary to an outsider – are anything but small and anything but ordinary.

Her two girls, one thirteen and on the spectrum, one nine and not, were chatting together over breakfast. This is what they said.

Little Sister: She didn’t even know who Picasso was! And we went to the museum and everything!

Big Sister: Well…what do you expect? She’s…typical. (looks at Little, puts hand on her arm) No offense.

Five lines of conversation.

An impenetrable wall of self-esteem.

Everything.

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