Tag Archives: Laxative

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

William asks…

How should I go about getting answers from our pediatrician?

I have three kids. Ages 6 yrs, 3 yrs, and 18 months. Our pediatrician has prescribed Polyethylene Glycol for two of my three kids for long term programs. Polyethylene Glycol, otherwise known as PEG’s or MiraLax, is a laxative made from linking longer strands of Ethylene Glycol together. Alone, Ethelyne Glycol is a very toxic chemical. In 2001 the F.D.A passed it’s use for ages 17 and up for up to 7 days. Since then, the F.D.A.’s adverse reports have said that PEG’s cause numerous issues in children including kidney failure, heart disease, and nueropsychiatric events such as autism, alzheimers, schizophrenia, and dementia. I was never told any of this and the pediatricians still prescribed programs containing over 17 mgs of this poison to my children every day. WITHOUT TESTING TO FIND A DIAGNOSIS. I am extremely angry and seriously considering lawsuits. My 6 yr old is autistic btw. I’m not giving them this chemical again, but, I need to somehow talk the pediatrician into doing his damn job and finding the problem. Any suggestions?
Point of reference that PEG’s are NOT approved for long term use….
http://www.gutsense.org/gutsense/the-role-of-miralax-laxative-in-autism-dementia-alzheimer.html
Thank you Shea. The symptoms are fecal impaction associated with autism. A huge hurtle for people with ASD’s is sensory impairments. My son can’t handle a lot of foods and hates water. My daughter was 6 wks old when she was prescribed MiraLax for constipation associated with hard dry stools. She was breastfed and I changed my diet drastically to try to correct the problem.

admin answers:

You need to ask for a pediatric GI consult. Pediatricians shouldn’t be prescribing long term GI treatment without a GI specialist’s input.

However, Miralax has been approved in long term treatment of certain bowel problems, and I have a son who’s been on it for years and will continue to be. So it’s not totally out of the question, but you do need someone who is familiar with the problem (and an actual diagnosis) and how to treat it, not a regular pediatrician who doesn’t specialist in it.

If the pediatrician won’t refer you, get a new pediatrician.

Eta – Again, I urge you to see a pediatric GI specialist. As I said, FOR CERTAIN PROBLEMS they have been approved. I’m not saying you have to remain on it, that’s why you should see a specialist, they will give you other forms of treatment if you like. I do appreciate your link and input, but believe me, this is something I have researched to exhaustion and am comfortable with my son’s treatment.

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