Tag Archives: Language Skills

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

William asks…

What are the symptoms of autism in children under two?

admin answers:

Appears indifferent to surroundings
Appears content to be alone, happier to play alone
Displays lack of interest in toys
Displays lack of response to others
Does not point out objects of interest to others (called protodeclarative pointing)
Marked reduction or increase in activity level
Resists cuddling

Young children with autism usually have impaired language development. They often have difficulty expressing needs (i.e., use gestures instead of words) and may laugh, cry, or show distress for unknown reasons. Some autistic patients develop rudimentary language skills that do not serve as an effective form of communication. They may develop abnormal patterns of speech that lack intonation and expression and may repeat words or phrases repetitively (called echolalia). Some children with autism learn to read.

Autistic children do not express interest in other people and often prefer to be alone. They may resist changes in their routine, repeat actions (e.g., turn in circles, flap their arms) over and over, and engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., bite or scratch themselves, bang their head).

Other symptoms in young children include:
Avoids cuddling or touching
Frequent behavioral outbursts, tantrums
Inappropriate attachments to objects
Maintains little or no eye contact
Over- or undersensitivity to pain, no fear of danger
Sustained abnormal play
Uneven motor skills
Unresponsiveness to normal teaching methods and verbal clues (may appear to be deaf despite normal hearing)

Research has shown that autism occurs more often in first born children and males. My daughter (first born) was an incredibly easy, cuddly baby, but definitely displayed language/communication delays. Her diagnosis is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

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Question?: Autism Symptoms 18 Months

Lisa asks…

What does it mean when you are autistic? How do you know you have autism?

doesn’t it mean that you dont know what is right and what is right? could someone elaborate?

admin answers:

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a disorder that you’re born with which profoundly impacts social development (even something simple like understanding pointing or knowing how to point often has to be explicitly taught. Many struggle with making eye contact, don’t respond to their name, etc) and causes severe restrictive or repetitive behaviors such as hand flapping, spinning, strange fascinations with particular things (like watching spinning wheels on toys, or memorizing baseball stats but not having any interest in the actual game itself) or complete meltdowns when routines are changed.

Within Autism Spectrum Disorder there are a few subtypes – the most common are classic autism and aspergers. Both have the symptoms mentioned above but classic autism requires also significant language delays for a diagnosis (such as not saying your first word by 18 months, not assembling simple 2-word sentences by around 24 months, etc) before the age of three (even if later language catches up).

There may be some impact to understanding right versus wrong, but there’s a lot more significant problems in understanding than just right vs. Wrong (such as not understanding cause and effect, not being able to answer simple questions about “who” or “why” or “what”), or even being able to follow simple commands. The impact of their language skills isn’t restricted to just right versus wrong.

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Question?: Autistic Definition

Steven asks…

Why is it hard for someone with Aspergers to understand idioms and other phrases?

I want to know in detail why they have trouble with idoms. Basically from what I heard, when you talk to someone with Aspergers, you have to “Say what you mean and mean what you say”.

If you just memorize the idioms, won’t know it’s an idiom and know it’s definition?

btw, do people with Aspergers also have trouble with names like “Burger King”? Do they really think it’s “a place for the king of burgers” in their mind, or what?

admin answers:

Aspergers is a form of autism. 1 of the main characteristics of autism is language and communication .A high functioning person with autism
( aspergers) will have similar language skills as ‘Raymond (rainman) Babbit and “Forrest Gump” DId you see those movies? Dustin Hoffman had more autistic triats because of his headbanging, daily routines, and stimming but his monotone voice and taking everything said literally is classic aspergers. Forrest was also monotone, seldom laughed, awkward socially and couldnt understand anything in abstract. Your burger king comment is cute and its possible some people with aspergers think that or had to learn that its just a name. IT depends on their level. Its not just idioms that they cannot grasp, slang words, facial expressions, gestures etc, are difficult also. For ex; ‘ The flick was bad, bro” He may not know ‘flick’, bad is bad and you must be speaking to your brother. Or an angry face or worried face will not be known, and that nod we do to mean ” Lets go” ….. He’ll stay!

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults Checklist

Betty asks…

How can you tell if you have autism?

Are there any online tests that I can take before I try and talk to a doctor about it?
I’m not looking to self diagnose, I am just looking for answers. I’ve known something was wrong with me since I was little, I just dont know what.
1574 – That describes me almost perfectly. I never look anyone in the eyes, I dont know why it just feels wierd.

I dont talk that much if at all, people make fun of me because of that all the time. I simply say – I have nothing to say, I dont see a reason to talk, and I dont want to.

And it is extremely hard for me to socialize. I dont understand how other people do it, I dont totally understand the point of it, most of it seems fake to me.

And I definatley do things on a sceduel, any deviating off this sceduel will really upset me.
I never really had the option of getting it diagnosed as a child.

In second grade they did try to put me into a remedial class. They made me take an IQ test which I ended up scoring a 135 on blowing that idea of theirs out of the water.

They ended up saying I have ADHD and made me take Ritalin every day…

admin answers:

Do you find yourself confused in social situations?

Are you passionately interested in a single topic?

Is it tough for you to make and maintain eye contact?

Then you, like many talented and intelligent adults, may be diagnosable with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Asperger Syndrome is different from other disorders on the autism spectrum, in part, because it is often diagnosed in older children and adults as opposed to very young children. That’s because Asperger Syndrome is a relatively mild form of ASD which does not include problems with basic language skills. Many people with Asperger Syndrome are very bright and capable. The issues that emerge for people diagnosed with Aspergers are related specifically to social and communication skills — skills that only become signficant as people get older and need to negotiate complex social situations.

The History of Asperger Syndrome
Hans Asperger was a Viennese child psychologist who worked with a group of boys all of whom had similar developmental differences. While they were all intelligent, and had normal language skills, they also had a set of autism-like symptoms. He came up with a description and diagnostic criteria for a syndrome, which he named for himself.

As a result of the second world war, Asperger’s work disappeared for a number of years. When it reappeared in the late 1980’s, it garnered a good deal of interest. Today, Asperger’s Syndrome is in the news virtually every day.

What does it mean to have Asperger’s Syndrome?
Clearly, since so many successful people seem to have the diagnosis (Dan Ackroyd, for one, announced his diagnosis on the air — and rumor has it that Bill Gates may also have Asperger’s) it is not a disability in the classic sense. In fact, some historians suggest that Einstein, Mozart, and Alan Turing (the inventor of the first electronic computer) may all have been diagnosable with Asperger’s.

What people with Asperger’s Syndrome do have in common is a set of characteristics that may make social interaction particularly difficult. Many “aspies” (a term that teens and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome sometimes use to refer to themselves) have been bullied or teased as children. They may be awkward with the opposite sex. And they may have a tough time maneuvering through complex social cues at school, at work, or elsewhere.

The Cambridge Lifespan Asperger Syndrome Service(CLASS), an organization in the United Kingdom that works with adults with Asperger’s has developed a simple ten question checklist to help with a preliminary self-diagnosis. If you answered “yes” to some or most of these questions, you may decide to find out more.

1.) I find social situations confusing.

2.) I find it hard to make small talk.

3.) I did not enjoy imaginative story-writing at school.

4.) I am good at picking up details and facts.

5.) I find it hard to work out what other people are thinking and feeling.

6.) I can focus on certain things for very long periods.

7.) People often say I was rude even when this was not intended.

8.) I have unusually strong, narrow interests.

9.) I do certain things in an inflexible, repetitive way.

10.) I have always had difficulty making friends.

If you do answer “yes” to many of these questions relative to yourself or a loved one, you may have uncovered an undiagnosed case of Asperger’s Syndrome.

For some teens and adults, this is a tremendous relief: it puts a name on a set of issues that has troubled them throughout their lives. And it also opens the door to support, treatment, and community.
But there is no obligation to do anything at all about Asperger’s Syndrome. In fact, many adults feel that being an “aspie” is a point of pride. They are unique, often successful individuals who are simply … themselves!

Check out this link, at the bottom of the page there are several related articles you might be interested in:

http://autism.about.com/od/aspergerssyndrome/a/adultsaspergers.htm

I hope this info helps! I have a relative that has this & he had almost the exact same experience you did in elementary school.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Teenagers

Thomas asks…

I think my 16 year old daughter is austistic. What are the symptoms?

Of autism in a teenager? before I take her to the doctor to get checked out id like to know how to tell if im just bs,ing or its the real deal .

admin answers:

Symptoms

Children with autism generally have problems in three crucial areas of development — social interaction, language and behavior. But because autism symptoms vary greatly, two children with the same diagnosis may act quite differently and have strikingly different skills. In most cases, though, severe autism is marked by a complete inability to communicate or interact with other people.

Some children show signs of autism in early infancy. Other children may develop normally for the first few months or years of life but then suddenly become withdrawn, become aggressive or lose language skills they’ve already acquired. Though each child with autism is likely to have a unique pattern of behavior, these are some common autism symptoms:

Social skills

Fails to respond to his or her name
Has poor eye contact
Appears not to hear you at times
Resists cuddling and holding
Appears unaware of others’ feelings
Seems to prefer playing alone — retreats into his or her “own world”

Language

Starts talking later than age 2, and has other developmental delays by 30 months
Loses previously acquired ability to say words or sentences
Doesn’t make eye contact when making requests
Speaks with an abnormal tone or rhythm — may use a singsong voice or robot-like speech
Can’t start a conversation or keep one going
May repeat words or phrases verbatim, but doesn’t understand how to use them

Behavior

Performs repetitive movements, such as rocking, spinning or hand-flapping
Develops specific routines or rituals
Becomes disturbed at the slightest change in routines or rituals
Moves constantly
May be fascinated by parts of an object, such as the spinning wheels of a toy car
May be unusually sensitive to light, sound and touch and yet oblivious to pain

Young children with autism also have a hard time sharing experiences with others. When read to, for example, they’re unlikely to point at pictures in the book. This early-developing social skill is crucial to later language and social development.

As they mature, some children with autism become more engaged with others and show less marked disturbances in behavior. Some, usually those with the least severe problems, eventually may lead normal or near-normal lives. Others, however, continue to have difficulty with language or social skills, and the adolescent years can mean a worsening of behavioral problems.

Most children with autism are slow to gain new knowledge or skills, and some have signs of lower than normal intelligence. Other children with autism have normal to high intelligence. These children learn quickly yet have trouble communicating, applying what they know in everyday life and adjusting in social situations. A small number of children with autism are “autistic savants” and have exceptional skills in a specific area, such as art, math or music.

God bless u and all your family

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Steven asks…

can anyone list the qualities possessed by autistic people?

I have heard some have good memory, others are good at art. Can anyone give a full detail?

admin answers:

Autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs)

Published by Bupa’s health information team, August 2007.

This factsheet is for people who would like information about autism and other autistic spectrum disorders.

Children with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) don’t develop the social and language skills that other children do. As a result of this, they find relating to other people difficult. They may also have unusual behaviours and learning difficulties.

* What is the autistic spectrum?
* Symptoms
* Causes
* Diagnosis
* Therapies and interventions
* Help and support
* Further information
* Questions and answers
* Related topics
* Sources

What is the autistic spectrum?

Autism is a range, or spectrum, of disorders that affect individuals to varying degrees. A child can have their own combination of difficulties, putting them somewhere on what is called the autistic spectrum. Some children with autism may have learning difficulties and very limited speech and communication. Other children with a milder form of autism, called Asperger’s syndrome, may have a good vocabulary but still have difficulty with communication.

According to the National Austistic Society, over 500,000 people in the UK have an ASD. A study published in 2006 has shown that as many as one in 100 children may have an ASD. It’s four times more common in boys than girls.
Symptoms

Children with an ASD have three main types of problems. These are to do with their:

* communication
* social development
* interests and behaviour (social imagination)

If you notice signs of ASD in your child, you should see your health visitor or GP.
Communication

Children with ASDs may not develop the usual speech or non-verbal (eg pointing) skills of other children of the same age. They may also have trouble with understanding meaning in spoken or written language. Children with severe autism may never speak at all but may be helped to communicate in other ways (eg signing or using picture symbols).

These communication problems may show up as:

* not babbling or pointing by the age of one
* not responding to their name
* not learning two words by the age of two
* in older children, unusual use of language and difficulty starting or keeping up conversations
* repeating words they have heard over and over again

Social development

Children with an ASD may have difficulty in making friends and getting on well with their peers. They may:

* seem very independent as toddlers and aloof when they get older
* have poor eye contact
* not seek affection in the usual way and resist being cuddled or kissed
* be unable to play with other children and have difficulty making friends
* seem to be “in a world of their own”
* not understand other people’s thoughts and emotions
* find it difficult to accept simple social rules, which can cause problems at school

Children with an ASD can be affectionate, but may not be able to respond to another person’s need for affection.
Behaviour and interests

Children with an ASD may show very little or no interest in play that involves pretending. Instead they may be overly interested in repetitive activities, such as lining up their toys or watching the washing machine drum rotate. Children with an ASD may also:

* learn to sit up or walk later than most children
* be oversensitive to noise or to touch (for instance, finding the vacuum cleaner or hairdryer deafening)
* have odd mannerisms such as rocking back and forth, hand flapping, walking on tip toes or head banging
* some may be clumsy and so struggle with physical activity

Older children and adolescents may develop obsessions such as an excessive interest in timetables or lists, and in storing up trivial facts.
Intelligence and autism

Around three-quarters of people with an ASD have a learning disability. Some people who have Asperger’s syndrome may have normal or high intelligence but struggle with social skills. Outstanding abilities with maths, music or drawing are uncommon.

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How To See Autism As A Genuine Perspective And The Reasoning Of An Autistic Mind

For starters I am an Aspie, an individual with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. It seems awfully strange that I am autistic, yet I have such great language skills, especially with typing. I would write with my hand, but my hand-writing is illegible. With that being said, I have a lot to say about my perspective as an autistic man.

First off, if you know someone with autism, then you have more than likely been touched by said person, as we are often very gifted in one way or another, despite our difficulties with communicating with those we interact with. We all feel a need to belong, whether we are autistic or not! We want nothing more than to please our loved-ones, and sometimes this is hard, as we tend to go overboard with things. Autism often comes with what is known as stemming, something that we use to normalize our environment.

Let me take you on an adventure inside of an autistic mind, and how you should view autism as a genuine, yet unique perspective!

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects the normal-functioning of the brain, in an otherwise healthy mind. The way we see the world is above and beyond normal understanding and functioning in the world, where we sometimes don’t understand our culture and society, and when we oftentimes dislike the cultural-norms, as we see the world as too entangled with social-customs, where problems could be solved with instead logic and reasoning, while at the same time we could affect the world with a high-capacity of intuition.

Autistic people feel that the world is unstable, mostly because of the social taboos, which are otherwise natural to us. The world would be much different if we made more sense, and not trying to control how we consume our culture. People want us to eat certain foods, when really we just want to enjoy our meals the way we want, in a healthy way, a way that most people feel is immoral. Why exactly do people believe that all wild-strawberries are poisonous? They hear it from their parents, who heard it from their grandparents, but why don’t they do their own research, or ask a professional?

We often hear that we can’t use our imagination for fun things, that we must work hard, everyday, all day, something that we want to change, as we know that humans are very social animals, and all we want is to explore our imaginations! Our perspectives show our wish to reconnect with our true-nature, the nature of exploring and enjoying life, while everyone else puts too many expectations on us. Everyone should just do what it is that is most enjoyable in life, and not being a drone!

As mentioned above, an autistic person only wants to get enjoyment and entertainment out of life. If everyone were to do what they enjoyed, the world would be a very happy and satisfied place! There are always jobs that you will enjoy, even if it isn’t extravagant. You, believe it or not, can enjoy being a janitor, but if you don’t enjoy it, you only take the job because you feel that “somebody has to do it”! Look, there are people out there who would enjoy that line of work, so leave it to them, and go after what you enjoy!

The autistic mind takes in from their environment, but they take what they get out of it and turn it into something remarkable! They try to make their living more meaningful and enjoyable, also more entertaining. If you were to live as an autistic person, you would totally change your attitude about how people should function! All you would want is to live a life that is meaningful, and you would constantly try to make the world a better place to live, not just for you, but for all who are in your perception.

Joseph D. Smith employs the Aspiezine, a topical blog and social network for those affected by and with autism, whether you are autistic or not!

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Exams Tests and Places to Get Help For Those With Asperger’s Syndrome

Exams Tests and Places to Get Help For Those With Asperger’s Syndrome

The doctor will take a medical history and ask questions regarding the child’s development including his or her motor development, language development, and any special interests that the child has expressed.

Making the diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome is difficult and takes the input of doctors, teachers, parents and other caregivers in order to make the diagnosis. There are specific criteria that need to be met in order to make the diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome including poor social interaction, unusual behavior, obsessive interests, and activities, normal language development, and normal self-help skills and curiosity about the surrounding environment.

The doctor will take a medical history and ask questions regarding the child’s development including his or her motor development, language development, and any special interests that the child has expressed. Social interactions will be noted and a history of the pregnancy and any family medical history or medical conditions will also be ascertained.

Exams and tests will be performed to help determine if Asperger’s syndrome is the correct diagnosis for your child.

Testing will probably include a Psychological Assessment, a communication assessment, and a psychiatric examination. The psychological assessment will look at intellectual function, learning style and intelligence quotient (IQ) as well as an assessment of motor skills. Personality assessment tests may also be performed. The communication assessment involves speech and formal language evaluations where the child will be tested to see how well they understand the use of language and how to communicate ideas. The child will also be tested regarding the ability to understand non-verbal communication and nonliteral language skills, such as humor or metaphor. The child’s voice regarding volume, stress, and pitch will be evaluated.

The psychiatric examination will include the child’s family, peer relationships, reactions to new encounters and the ability to understand and respond to the feelings of others, and also the ability to interpret indirect communication such as sarcasm or teasing. Your child may be observed at home and at school. Signs of conditions such as anxiety and depression will be watched for during observations. Medical personnel will be looking for signs of compliance with the criteria set for Asperger’s Syndrome in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is a publication of the American Psychiatric Association and used to be a standard for diagnosing Asperger’s Syndrome and other Mental Disorders.

Many times a child is misdiagnosed with other conditions prior to be correctly diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. Like most diseases and conditions it is often necessary to rule out other conditions and disorders when making a determination of a diagnosis. It is often a team effort that involves doctors, parents, teachers, psychiatrists, and others who have observed the behavior and communicative abilities of the child.

Places to get help for those with Asperger’s Syndrome:

There are many resources available to gather information concerning Asperger’s Syndrome online and offline.

Online you can find information by going to Aspergerinfo.com or to the Online Asperger Syndrome Information and Support Website located at:

http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/

Other organizations that can give support and information about Asperger’s Syndrome are:

Global and Regional Asperger Syndrome Partnership located in New York, USA and also online at:

http://www.grasp.org/

Families of Adults Afflicted with Asperger’s Syndrome (FAAAS) located in Centerville, MA USA and on the Web at:

http://www.faaas.org/

MAAP Services for Autism and Asperger Syndrome located in Crown Point Indiana and on the Web at:

http://www.maapservices.org

Tagged as: Exams Tests and Places  Asperger’s Syndrome

View the original article here

Dolman/Delacato method

Dolman/Delacato method

Dolman and Delacato believe that children should learn to crawl or creep before learning to walk.

Three times a year, the Delacato Centre holds courses, which take place in January, May and September, and last for one week. Parents make an appointment to learn how to conduct the therapy at home.

In a study by Rimland and Edelson, 445 parents of autistic children who participated in the therapy reported seeing improvement in their children.

The Dolman/Delacato Method is also known as patterning. Advocates of this method view autism as being the result of a brain injury. The idea with this therapy is that in children with autism (and other disabilities) the brain can be taught to accept new experiences through patterns of movement. New pathways in the brain are forged by making the child crawl or move as children do at earlier developmental stages.

Prior to the therapy beginning, the child is assessed to determine which requirements must be met in his or her therapy sessions. Then, the child participates in therapy sessions lasting for an average of two hours per day, during which he or she performs exercises based on physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and education. The parents may carry out this therapy at home.

Advocates state they’ve seen results ranging from extremely successful to noticeably successful.

Success in the Dolman/Delacato Method rests on the shoulders of the parents. The more work the parents do with the child, the more success will be noticed. Parents who work extensively with the child will also see results more rapidly. It is claimed that within eight months from the beginning of the therapy, some children from ages 2-10 years old are re-classified as ‘high functioning.’ For children with more serious forms of ASD, benefits such as better eye contact, improved attention span, improved behavior, and better language skills are seen.

Tagged as: Dolman/Delacato method

View the original article here

Exams Tests and Places to Get Help For Those With Asperger’s Syndrome

Exams Tests and Places to Get Help For Those With Asperger’s Syndrome

The doctor will take a medical history and ask questions regarding the child’s development including his or her motor development, language development, and any special interests that the child has expressed.

Making the diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome is difficult and takes the input of doctors, teachers, parents and other caregivers in order to make the diagnosis. There are specific criteria that need to be met in order to make the diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome including poor social interaction, unusual behavior, obsessive interests, and activities, normal language development, and normal self-help skills and curiosity about the surrounding environment.

The doctor will take a medical history and ask questions regarding the child’s development including his or her motor development, language development, and any special interests that the child has expressed. Social interactions will be noted and a history of the pregnancy and any family medical history or medical conditions will also be ascertained.

Exams and tests will be performed to help determine if Asperger’s syndrome is the correct diagnosis for your child.

Testing will probably include a Psychological Assessment, a communication assessment, and a psychiatric examination. The psychological assessment will look at intellectual function, learning style and intelligence quotient (IQ) as well as an assessment of motor skills. Personality assessment tests may also be performed. The communication assessment involves speech and formal language evaluations where the child will be tested to see how well they understand the use of language and how to communicate ideas. The child will also be tested regarding the ability to understand non-verbal communication and nonliteral language skills, such as humor or metaphor. The child’s voice regarding volume, stress, and pitch will be evaluated.

The psychiatric examination will include the child’s family, peer relationships, reactions to new encounters and the ability to understand and respond to the feelings of others, and also the ability to interpret indirect communication such as sarcasm or teasing. Your child may be observed at home and at school. Signs of conditions such as anxiety and depression will be watched for during observations. Medical personnel will be looking for signs of compliance with the criteria set for Asperger’s Syndrome in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which is a publication of the American Psychiatric Association and used to be a standard for diagnosing Asperger’s Syndrome and other Mental Disorders.

Many times a child is misdiagnosed with other conditions prior to be correctly diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. Like most diseases and conditions it is often necessary to rule out other conditions and disorders when making a determination of a diagnosis. It is often a team effort that involves doctors, parents, teachers, psychiatrists, and others who have observed the behavior and communicative abilities of the child.

Places to get help for those with Asperger’s Syndrome:

There are many resources available to gather information concerning Asperger’s Syndrome online and offline.

Online you can find information by going to Aspergerinfo.com or to the Online Asperger Syndrome Information and Support Website located at:

http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/

Other organizations that can give support and information about Asperger’s Syndrome are:

Global and Regional Asperger Syndrome Partnership located in New York, USA and also online at:

http://www.grasp.org/

Families of Adults Afflicted with Asperger’s Syndrome (FAAAS) located in Centerville, MA USA and on the Web at:

http://www.faaas.org/

MAAP Services for Autism and Asperger Syndrome located in Crown Point Indiana and on the Web at:

http://www.maapservices.org

Tagged as: Exams Tests and Places  Asperger’s Syndrome

View the original article here