Tag Archives: Language Communication

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

William asks…

What are the symptoms of autism in children under two?

admin answers:

Appears indifferent to surroundings
Appears content to be alone, happier to play alone
Displays lack of interest in toys
Displays lack of response to others
Does not point out objects of interest to others (called protodeclarative pointing)
Marked reduction or increase in activity level
Resists cuddling

Young children with autism usually have impaired language development. They often have difficulty expressing needs (i.e., use gestures instead of words) and may laugh, cry, or show distress for unknown reasons. Some autistic patients develop rudimentary language skills that do not serve as an effective form of communication. They may develop abnormal patterns of speech that lack intonation and expression and may repeat words or phrases repetitively (called echolalia). Some children with autism learn to read.

Autistic children do not express interest in other people and often prefer to be alone. They may resist changes in their routine, repeat actions (e.g., turn in circles, flap their arms) over and over, and engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., bite or scratch themselves, bang their head).

Other symptoms in young children include:
Avoids cuddling or touching
Frequent behavioral outbursts, tantrums
Inappropriate attachments to objects
Maintains little or no eye contact
Over- or undersensitivity to pain, no fear of danger
Sustained abnormal play
Uneven motor skills
Unresponsiveness to normal teaching methods and verbal clues (may appear to be deaf despite normal hearing)

Research has shown that autism occurs more often in first born children and males. My daughter (first born) was an incredibly easy, cuddly baby, but definitely displayed language/communication delays. Her diagnosis is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

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Question?: Autistic Symptoms

Sharon asks…

How can you tell when a child is autistic?

I have known people for years without knowing they’re autistic. I don’t even realize it until they tell me.

How can you tell when a child is autistic? It’s hard for me to tell for some reason

admin answers:

Technically, a physician must perform the tests to determine a proper diagnosis. However, the main areas include a lack of language/communication development, lack of social development or interaction, and intense pre-occupation with one or two particular things (such as trains, sheep, or comic books). Most of these symptoms while be noticable by the age of 3.

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Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 23 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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The first prospective study of ethnic differences in the symptoms of autism in toddlers shows that children from a minority background have more delayed language, communication and gross motor skills than Caucasian children with the disorder. Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute concluded that subtle developmental delays may be going unaddressed in minority toddlers until more severe symptoms develop.

While the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) does not differ across racial and ethnic groups, some studies have shown that children of African American, Hispanic and Asian descent are less likely to receive an early diagnosis of autism than Caucasian children. In this new study, Dr. Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, investigated whether the symptoms of autism in toddlers play a role in this disparity in diagnosis as part of her work to improve access, education and outreach to minority communities.

“We found the toddlers in the minority group were significantly further behind than the non-minority group in development of language and motor skills and showed more severe autism symptoms in their communication abilities,” says Landa, whose study included children and parents of African American, Asian and Hispanic descent. “It’s really troubling when we look at these data alongside diagnosis statistics because they suggest that children in need of early detection and intervention are not getting it.” (Visit this online discussion with Dr. Landa for more in-depth information.)

The study, published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (Epub ahead of print), examined development in 84 toddlers with ASD at an average 26-28 months of age using three standardized instruments that evaluate child development. Children were evaluated by their caregivers using the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Caregiver Questionnaire (CSBS-DP CQ) and by research clinicians using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS). After controlling for participants’ socioeconomic status, all three tools indicated a significant difference between minority and non-minority children.

Previous studies published by Dr. Landa and her colleagues at Kennedy Krieger show that detection of ASD is possible at as early as 14 months of age. While early diagnosis is crucial for accessing intervention services, studies examining children from minority groups suggest considerable delays in the diagnosis of ASD in these children relative to their Caucasian peers.

Dr. Landa points to cultural differences in what communities perceive as typical and atypical development in young children, the relationships between families and respected community physicians, and the stigma that some cultures place on disability as areas where education and awareness could have meaningful impact.

“Addressing cultural influences gives us a clear target to improve service delivery to minority children, but these findings may also suggest biological and other culturally-related differences between Caucasian and minority children with autism,” says Landa. “There are other complex diseases that present differently in different ethnic groups and more research is needed to investigate this possibility.”

The findings of this research prompted Dr. Landa and her team to begin a study that will document the age at which minority parents first noticed signs of developmental disruption in their children, the specific nature of the behavior that concerned them, and the children’s intervention history. Additional research is also needed to study group-specific differences in the presentation of autism symptoms between a variety of minority groups.

“Although questions remain on why these differences exist, by taking steps to develop more culturally-sensitive screening and assessment practices, with a special focus on educating parents, clinicians and health educators, I believe we can empower parents to identify early warning signs and ensure minority children have the same access to services as their Caucasian peers,” says Landa.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Support for this study was provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration, National Institutes of Health and the Krieger Foundation.
Kennedy Krieger Institute Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Kennedy Krieger Institute. “Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 23 Feb. 2012. Web.
9 Mar. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Harold Rongey, Ph.D. on 24 Feb 2012 at 1:01 pm

In my studies I have observed three problems among the minority parents:
1. They do not know how to cook simple foods
2. They often are with the WIC program that I have found the diet lacking in brain nutrients
3. They lack sufficient income to provide an adequate diet—mostly because they do not have proper nutritional understanding of what the child needs to be healthy.

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