Tag Archives: Iq Test

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults Checklist

Nancy asks…

Help I think I got Aspergers syndrome?

Im 14 and I have a really hard time talking to people, Most of the time I just don’t talk to people because normally I try to say something and I end up making it weird by mixing my words around. I feel like I don’t think, as if I am brain dead. I have been homeschooled half my life and I am never really put into social situations and it really makes me very sad. I can’t even make smalltalk because I don’t know what to say…. I want friend’s but I feel different then them. Almost like everyone is popular and im the shy kid in the corner. I feel very depressed, Almost as if I have no thoughts ideas or imagination, I have thought over suicide and I used to cut myself but I stopped. Are these signs of aspergers or am I just depressed and really socially unskilled because or homeschooling…. Help? >:
Also I really don’t want to spend a lot of money for brain scans or whatever docters do to people. :/

admin answers:

There are plenty of symptom checklists out there, so I won’t cut and paste them for you. While most individuals with a personality disorder on the autism spectrum are diagnosed at an age younger than yourself, Asperger’s many times can go unnoticed until the individual becomes older and the necessary social interactions that go along with becoming an adult become manifest.

You don’t get brain scans (unless you want to, or are part of a study), the diagnosis is made through observation, interview with you, and with your parents (together and separately) to establish the veracity of claims, and certain patterns from childhood, and finally a battery of psychological tests, often a minimum of an IQ test (there will often be large discrepancies between VCI and PSI for instance), a personality test appropriate for age (adults often take the MMPI-2), a psych. History, etc. The depression Dx is more easily arrived at, and far more prevalent than a personality disorder, but pursue it if you believe it’s something you have. Look at the vignettes of people with the disorder and if you say to yourself “That’s me!” than you should definitely seek out a diagnostic test to rule it either in or out.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults Checklist

Betty asks…

How can you tell if you have autism?

Are there any online tests that I can take before I try and talk to a doctor about it?
I’m not looking to self diagnose, I am just looking for answers. I’ve known something was wrong with me since I was little, I just dont know what.
1574 – That describes me almost perfectly. I never look anyone in the eyes, I dont know why it just feels wierd.

I dont talk that much if at all, people make fun of me because of that all the time. I simply say – I have nothing to say, I dont see a reason to talk, and I dont want to.

And it is extremely hard for me to socialize. I dont understand how other people do it, I dont totally understand the point of it, most of it seems fake to me.

And I definatley do things on a sceduel, any deviating off this sceduel will really upset me.
I never really had the option of getting it diagnosed as a child.

In second grade they did try to put me into a remedial class. They made me take an IQ test which I ended up scoring a 135 on blowing that idea of theirs out of the water.

They ended up saying I have ADHD and made me take Ritalin every day…

admin answers:

Do you find yourself confused in social situations?

Are you passionately interested in a single topic?

Is it tough for you to make and maintain eye contact?

Then you, like many talented and intelligent adults, may be diagnosable with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Asperger Syndrome is different from other disorders on the autism spectrum, in part, because it is often diagnosed in older children and adults as opposed to very young children. That’s because Asperger Syndrome is a relatively mild form of ASD which does not include problems with basic language skills. Many people with Asperger Syndrome are very bright and capable. The issues that emerge for people diagnosed with Aspergers are related specifically to social and communication skills — skills that only become signficant as people get older and need to negotiate complex social situations.

The History of Asperger Syndrome
Hans Asperger was a Viennese child psychologist who worked with a group of boys all of whom had similar developmental differences. While they were all intelligent, and had normal language skills, they also had a set of autism-like symptoms. He came up with a description and diagnostic criteria for a syndrome, which he named for himself.

As a result of the second world war, Asperger’s work disappeared for a number of years. When it reappeared in the late 1980’s, it garnered a good deal of interest. Today, Asperger’s Syndrome is in the news virtually every day.

What does it mean to have Asperger’s Syndrome?
Clearly, since so many successful people seem to have the diagnosis (Dan Ackroyd, for one, announced his diagnosis on the air — and rumor has it that Bill Gates may also have Asperger’s) it is not a disability in the classic sense. In fact, some historians suggest that Einstein, Mozart, and Alan Turing (the inventor of the first electronic computer) may all have been diagnosable with Asperger’s.

What people with Asperger’s Syndrome do have in common is a set of characteristics that may make social interaction particularly difficult. Many “aspies” (a term that teens and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome sometimes use to refer to themselves) have been bullied or teased as children. They may be awkward with the opposite sex. And they may have a tough time maneuvering through complex social cues at school, at work, or elsewhere.

The Cambridge Lifespan Asperger Syndrome Service(CLASS), an organization in the United Kingdom that works with adults with Asperger’s has developed a simple ten question checklist to help with a preliminary self-diagnosis. If you answered “yes” to some or most of these questions, you may decide to find out more.

1.) I find social situations confusing.

2.) I find it hard to make small talk.

3.) I did not enjoy imaginative story-writing at school.

4.) I am good at picking up details and facts.

5.) I find it hard to work out what other people are thinking and feeling.

6.) I can focus on certain things for very long periods.

7.) People often say I was rude even when this was not intended.

8.) I have unusually strong, narrow interests.

9.) I do certain things in an inflexible, repetitive way.

10.) I have always had difficulty making friends.

If you do answer “yes” to many of these questions relative to yourself or a loved one, you may have uncovered an undiagnosed case of Asperger’s Syndrome.

For some teens and adults, this is a tremendous relief: it puts a name on a set of issues that has troubled them throughout their lives. And it also opens the door to support, treatment, and community.
But there is no obligation to do anything at all about Asperger’s Syndrome. In fact, many adults feel that being an “aspie” is a point of pride. They are unique, often successful individuals who are simply … themselves!

Check out this link, at the bottom of the page there are several related articles you might be interested in:

http://autism.about.com/od/aspergerssyndrome/a/adultsaspergers.htm

I hope this info helps! I have a relative that has this & he had almost the exact same experience you did in elementary school.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults Checklist

Chris asks…

Do I have high-functioning autism or low functioning?

I am 21 years old and have been experiencing problems fitting into the social norms of society. I have the exact symptoms of aspergers and low functioning autism. I have specific interests and only like to talk about what im interested in. I have no social skills so I fail interviews. Never have the right word for the right situation I feel like a child in an adult body. I understand adult subjects such as algebra, physics, and am into strange science such as antigravity and and am into electronics and lasers and atoms all science and think about those things constantly. I am seeing a neurologist he claims I dont have aspergers or he doesnt think I have it because aspergers is diagnosed at a earlier age, but I have had these symptoms my whole life. Since I was 4 my mom says I was different and I matched every single symptom on the asperger or autism checklist for children, I just was not diagnosed, and I feel different than everyone. At my temp jobs I am quiet unless it’s about what I am interested in otherwise I dont talk. I feel I dont have a high iq because I failed the asvab I took at meps and also didnt do too well on an iq test on the internet one was phd certified and one was on the mensa website. Also after highschool I was unemployed for a year then worked for 6 months then was unemployed for a year and a half and I was isolated and didnt interact with people because I do not connect well with people I am socially awkward so my memory isnt what it used to be and am only able to get jobs through a temp service because I fail interviews. So my question is despite all of my specialized interests, do people with aspergers have memory problems? or since I have trouble retaining info and feel I dont have a high or average iq, do I have low functioning autism? Sorry for such a long descriptive story and sorry for not keeping it concise. I hope hope someone has a helpful opinion.

admin answers:

My daughter has autism and she does not have a memory problem per say she is social different as you wrote and she has certain things that she excels at things that interest her if the doctor said you did not have aspergers and you feel you are wrongly diagnosed go to another doctor get a second opinion only a doctor can diagnose you

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Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

If you have lived all your life with not being able to fully participate in small talk because you do not understand the body language, and other non-verbal communications that goes on with small talk, or you just do not understand the need for such nonessential language, or if you have difficulty dealing with any kind of social situation at work, school or at home perhaps you are an adult who has undiagnosed Asperger Syndrome.

The reason people reach adulthood and go undiagnosed is because it is common for there to be misdiagnosis or for physicians and parents to not recognize the signs and symptoms of this relatively new neurological disorder.

Typically when adults come to be diagnosed they are given an IQ test. People with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) typically have normal or above normal IQs. An assessment of adaptive skills that are designed to test the individual’s ability to manage complex social situations is then administered. If the person being assessed is still living with a parent, or if the parent is available, the parent is given the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) for an early history of how the individual functioned in social situations, in his or her behavior and how the individual was able to communicate. The symptoms don’t just show up later in life, they were there since childhood. If it is not possible to interview the parent than the individual is asked to describe their childhood for clues of how they interacted socially, behaviorally and how they communicated with others.

Another test is the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) which scrutinizes the social and communication skills as well as behavior of young adults and adults. This test helps to determine if the individual meets the criteria for Asperger’s Syndrome.

It is the doctor’s job to distinguish between shyness, social phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorders and Asperger’s Syndrome. Since there are distinguishing characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome that can be similar to other conditions and disorders it is important to get a complete family history since it is known that it runs in families. Often times there is an eccentric Aunt, or odd Grandfather who just may have also have had Asperger’s Syndrome.

The diagnosis is very important because it is with a diagnosis that the adult can finally put a name to the set of behaviors and inability to communicate with others. He or she can finally know why they were so different from others growing up. The diagnosis often brings great relief to those who suffer and to their families. Once the diagnosis is made the doctor can devise a treatment plan. The treatment plan will include interventions and therapies that may include speech therapy, behavioral therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy for awkwardness of gait. Medication may be prescribed if needed for anxiety and depression.

Back To Top: Diagnosing Asperger

Autism Checklist
Autism Classifications
Un-Diagnosing Asperger‘s autisable
The DSM-V and the redefining the diagnosis of Asperger’s.… Tagged as: Detecting Autism, Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

View the original article here

Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

If you have lived all your life with not being able to fully participate in small talk because you do not understand the body language, and other non-verbal communications that goes on with small talk, or you just do not understand the need for such nonessential language, or if you have difficulty dealing with any kind of social situation at work, school or at home perhaps you are an adult who has undiagnosed Asperger Syndrome.

The reason people reach adulthood and go undiagnosed is because it is common for there to be misdiagnosis or for physicians and parents to not recognize the signs and symptoms of this relatively new neurological disorder.

Typically when adults come to be diagnosed they are given an IQ test. People with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) typically have normal or above normal IQs. An assessment of adaptive skills that are designed to test the individual’s ability to manage complex social situations is then administered. If the person being assessed is still living with a parent, or if the parent is available, the parent is given the Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI) for an early history of how the individual functioned in social situations, in his or her behavior and how the individual was able to communicate. The symptoms don’t just show up later in life, they were there since childhood. If it is not possible to interview the parent than the individual is asked to describe their childhood for clues of how they interacted socially, behaviorally and how they communicated with others.

Another test is the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) which scrutinizes the social and communication skills as well as behavior of young adults and adults. This test helps to determine if the individual meets the criteria for Asperger’s Syndrome.

It is the doctor’s job to distinguish between shyness, social phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorders and Asperger’s Syndrome. Since there are distinguishing characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome that can be similar to other conditions and disorders it is important to get a complete family history since it is known that it runs in families. Often times there is an eccentric Aunt, or odd Grandfather who just may have also have had Asperger’s Syndrome.

Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

The diagnosis is very important because it is with a diagnosis that the adult can finally put a name to the set of behaviors and inability to communicate with others. He or she can finally know why they were so different from others growing up. The diagnosis often brings great relief to those who suffer and to their families. Once the diagnosis is made the doctor can devise a treatment plan. The treatment plan will include interventions and therapies that may include speech therapy, behavioral therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy for awkwardness of gait. Medication may be prescribed if needed for anxiety and depression.

Tagged as: Detecting Autism, Diagnosing Asperger Syndrome in Adults

View the original article here

Theodore Kaczynski Biography

The Unabomber, this is perhaps the most famous other name given to Theodore “Ted” Kaczynski. But who is Theodore Kaczynski? What is his life all about? What led him to be named as the Unabomber?

Who is Theodore Kaczynski?

This man was born in Chicago Illinois on May 22, 1942. As an infant, he developed allergic reactions to some medicines thus causing him to be in the hospital for a few weeks. As a result, he became a cry baby and even withdrew himself from other members of the family. Despite that, he was given all the attention he needed.

His mother noticed that even as a child, Ted is a gifted individual. There are several facets of his life that proved that. First, when he was 10, he took an IQ test and garnered a score of 170. Second, he finished high school in only two years. Third, he pursued his love for mathematics through no less than Harvard University.

His intellectual capabilities overshadowed his socializing skills. Many people observed he was the shy type, often walking pass a crowd without even greeting them. He concentrated more on his studies and never had a time to play with others. Because of these instances, people thought he had a mild case of autism known as Asperger’s Syndrome.

He was subjected to several psychological experiments together with other students of Dr. Henry Murray. This mind control test was all about how people cope with their studies with stressful conditions.

Ted’s life after his studies

Ted decided to move to Ann Arbor, Michigan right after he graduated from Harvard in 1962. In this new place, he took up both his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees. After finishing all these degrees, he focused on the study of Complex Analysis (with a specialization in the field of Geometric Function Theory). His dissertation paper earned an award in 1967.

During the later part of that year, Ted decided to transfer to California. He landed a job as an assistant professor in mathematics in the University of California. But since he is anti-social, so to speak, students were quite adamant to approach him thus causing him to have poor reviews during his stay in the university. He then resigned in 1969 despite the support given to him by his co-professors.

Living a life of a hermit

After leaving the university, he decided to live in a small shack. He had nothing to support himself except going for random jobs and asking financial aid from his family.

It was in 1978 when a sudden turn of events happened in Ted’s life. He filled in a package of explosives and left it at the University of Illinois with the sender’s name “Professor Buckley Crist”. The package was sent back to the supposed addressee. But since Crist knew he did not send any package, he opened it up and the explosive caused minor injuries on him.

The Unabomber issue

From that simple package, Ted never stopped sending explosive packages to airline officials. In fact, he planted one on a cargo plane in 1979. The bomb was easily detected and during the investigation, the FBI called their suspect the “Unabomber”. It was John Douglas, an FBI agent who supposed the bomb was made by an academic individual. But his claims were rejected thus no fingers were able to point out to Ted Kaczynski.

He continued sending the bombs (having an “FC” or Freedom Club inscription) with the first serious injury caused in 1985. He stopped what he was doing in 1987. But, in 1993 he started sending out these explosive packages again. From then on, more fatal bombs were sent to various individuals.

It was in 1995 when he sent mails to his victims and demanded that his 35,000-page “Unabomber Manifesto” be published in various newspapers. The Washington Post and New York Times published the same for the public’s safety.

Ted’s brother recognized the handwriting and reported the incident to the FBI. Forensic linguists investigated on the matter with the help of Ted’s family members. It was in April 3, 1996 when Ted was arrested and nearly two years later, in January 22, 1998, Ted pleaded guilty.

This Article is written by John C Arkin from printerinkcartridges.printcountry.com the contributor of PrintCountry Articles. More information on the subject is at Theodore Kaczynski Biography, and related resources can be found at Discount Iphone Accessories.
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