Tag Archives: health

Question?: Asperger Syndrome Symptoms

Ken asks…

What is holding intense grudges a symptom of?

Is it a symptom of a disorder, or anything, if a person holds lifelong grudges, even for slights or misunderstandings, even from childhood? Is it a symptom of aspergers syndrome?

admin answers:

Well what will happen with all of the unforgivingness and not letting it all go, it will all just pile up and in time it will come out in another way. Addiction, Obesity, Mental Problems, Health ect
There are recovery tools of the 12 step program that is not just for addicts, it is really good for everyone to learn how to let go and let God. The peace is awesome.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Children

Thomas asks…

What are the chances of us having an autistic child?

My husband’s niece has Asperger Syndrome. Are the chances higher than average for us to have a baby with AS or autism?

admin answers:

There are a few different spectrums of Autism and ASperger syndrome is one of them,it is less severe and usually occurs in females..Autism is becoming more frequent yet doctors and scientists truly dont know what the cause is but they do believe it may be genetic,and since it usually isnt diagnosed until the ages between 2 and 4,it would be highly unlikely to detect beforehand if you and your husbands child will develop it..still yet,you and your husband should see a genetic counselor and have tests run before getting pregnant to rule out any other possible genetic abnormalities…the good news though,is that even with Autism reaching its all time high,the treatments are getting better and with more success…hope this helped! Good luck…

For more info visit
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

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Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Anxiety / Stress;  GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 21 Sep 2012 – 1:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity
5 starsnot yet rated
One in 88 children has been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study by a University of Missouri researcher found that many children with ASD also experience anxiety, chronic gastrointestinal (GI) problems and atypical sensory responses, which are heightened reactions to light, sound or particular textures. These problems appear to be highly related and can have significant effects on children’s daily lives, including their functioning at home and in school.

Micah Mazurek, an assistant professor of health psychology and a clinical child psychologist, found in her study of 2,973 children and adolescents with ASD that nearly one-fourth also had chronic GI problems, such as constipation, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea or nausea. The results also showed that children with chronic GI problems were more likely to experience anxiety and sensory problems.

“These problems can have a very real impact on daily life. Children with anxiety may be distressed or reluctant to engage in new activities, and those with sensory problems may have trouble paying attention or participating in over-stimulating enviornments,” Mazurek said. “These children may also suffer uncomfortable GI problems that they may not be able to communicate about to adults.”

Clinicians should be aware that anxiety, GI problems and sensory sensitivity often co-occur in individuals with ASD. Effectively managing these concurrent issues may improve children’s quality of life and their responses to treatment, Mazurek said.

“Parents need to be aware that these problems may underlie some of their children’s difficulties, so if they notice any symptoms, they should talk to their doctors or therapists about treatment options,” Mazurek said. “Practitioners who work with children with ASD need to be mindful that there is a pretty high rate of these problems, so if children are treated for one issue, it may helpful to screen for these additional symptoms.”

This is the first study to examine the relationships among anxiety, GI problems and sensory over-responsivity in a large, nationally representative sample of children and adolescents with ASD. Participants in the study were enrolled in the Autism Treatment Network, a network of 17 autism centers throughout North America that are focused on best practices for medical treatment of children with ASD.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study, “Anxiety, Sensory Over-Responsivity, and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” was published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. Mazurek is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Psychology in the MU School of Health Professions and a clinical child psychologist at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Mazurek’s coauthors from the School of Health Professions include Stephen Kanne, executive director of the Thompson Center and the William and Nancy Thompson Endowed Chair in Child Health in the Department of Health Psychology; and Lee Ann Lowery, director of the MU Pediatric Occupational Therapy Clinic in the Thompson Center and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy. Several experts external to MU also contributed to the study.
University of Missouri-Columbia Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 21 Sep. 2012. Web.
26 Sep. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity’

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Understanding Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy And The Health Benefits It Offers

HBOT or Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy refers to the medicated use of 100% pure oxygen which is poured in at an elevated pressure than the normal atmospheric level, in an enclosed chamber known as hyperbaric chamber. Being in practice since the 1600s, the hyperbaric therapy has found its clinical usage in the mid 1800s. Hyperbaric research and clinical trials in the 1950’s unveiled a number of benefits which can be derived from hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In late 1960s, Hyperbaric Oxygen Committee was developed by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) to supervise the effectiveness of the practice of hyperbaric medicine.

Hyperbaric therapy can be either carried out in small monoplace chambers which is suited for a single person as well as in large multi-place chambers which can accommodate more than ten people at a time. The effectiveness or the mode of treatment in both of these chambers are the same. In either case, the therapy session may last for about half an hour or can stretch up to couple of hours, depending on the unique conditions of the patients.

What is a Monoplace Oxygen Chamber?

In monoplace HBOT chambers, the patient needs to lie down on a padded table, which is then slid into a plastic tube, about seven feet in length. As pure oxygen is poured in to the chamber, the pressure inside the tube is gradually increased to about 2.5 times than that of the normal atmospheric pressure. The patient needs to inhale and exhale normally during the therapy session. In case the patient feels any discomfort in breathing, then pressure is slightly decreased.

What is a Multiplace Oxygen Chamber?

In multiplace HBOT chambers, the therapist or a medical practitioner usually monitors the entire session. The patients inside the chamber are provided with a close-fit plastic hood through which pressurized pure oxygen is supplied. The patient inhales the pure oxygen through the hood. The amount of pressure used in these types of hyperbaric chambers is generally four times than the normal atmospheric pressure.

Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy has several health benefits. Inhaling oxygen under higher atmospheric pressure strengthens the circulatory system. The treatment also stimulates blood supply to various organs in the body. It also clears the barrier that obstructs the adequate blood flow into the brain. The hyperbaric treatment is also known to stimulate the formation of superoxide dismutase (SOD).

Hyperbaric therapy is used for treating of air embolism. Embolism is a condition which is caused due to the presence of air bubbles in the bloodstream. Hyperbaric therapy has been found effective for treating decompression sickness, a condition mostly experienced by the scuba divers. In general, the therapy is used to treatment inflammation, radiation injury, carbon monoxide poisoning, thermal burns and cyanide poisoning. Many researches and studies have been conducted on hyperbaric treatment and its role in improving the conditions of autism. Though the medical faculties are yet to unanimously approve hyperbaric oxygen therapy as one of the treatments for Autism, many case studies have revealed that significant improvements have been noticed within an Autistic child post twenty sessions of hyperbaric therapy.

Robin Jhonson the author of the article is a renowned neurologist in USA. He has been one of the main members of the team that perform hyperbaric research from time to time to evaluate its effectiveness in improving the Autistic conditions.

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Autism Law, Financial Burdens Leave Families Struggling With Health Care Needs

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Health Insurance / Medical Insurance
Article Date: 17 Jul 2012 – 2:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Autism Law, Financial Burdens Leave Families Struggling With Health Care Needs
3 and a half starsnot yet rated
While the causes of autism continue to be debated and bandied about, real families who have children with autism spectrum disorders are left to struggle with expensive health care needs. These costs can be devastating – but they can also be markedly different if the family lives in Massachusetts or Maine.

Advocates in many states have lobbied for legislation to force private insurers to offer autism services at the same levels as other covered services. A new study by Susan Parish, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Disability Policy at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, looks at the effectiveness of these so-called parity laws in reducing families’ financial burdens. It was published in the journal Intellectual and Development Disabilities.

According to the National Conference of State Legislators, parity, as it relates to mental health and substance abuse, prohibits insurers or health care service plans from discriminating between coverage offered for mental illness, serious mental illness, substance abuse, and other physical disorders and diseases. In short, parity requires insurers to provide the same level of benefits for mental illness, serious mental illness or substance abuse as for other physical disorders and diseases. These benefits include visit limits, deductibles, copayments, and lifetime and annual limits.

“We found that families who live in states that have passed parity legislation spent considerably less for their children with autism than families living in states without such legislation,” Parish says.

The study examined data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, which includes a group of more than 2,000 children with autism living across the United States.

Data revealed that more than one-third of the families reported spending more than three percent of their gross annual incomes on services for their children with autism.

“Families raising children with autism incur exceptionally high out-of-pocket costs. These costs pay for things that insurance doesn’t fully cover, like therapies and behavior management interventions,” says Parish. “These services are often critically important to the well-being and development of children with autism.”

Where families live really matters, Parish concluded. Families living in states that had enacted so-called parity legislation had much lower financial burden than families who lived in states without such legislative protections.

Data found that 60 percent of families in Massachusetts, Missouri, and Utah had out-of-pocket in excess of $500 annually. By comparison, 27 percent of Maine families spent above $500 annually. At the time the survey was collected, in 2005, Massachusetts, Missouri and Utah did not have parity legislation, but Maine did. ?Furthermore, these findings were robust. Even after controlling for a host of characteristics including severity of the child’s impairment, family income, and state wealth, families’ financial burden was much less if they lived in states that had passed parity legislation.

According to the advocacy group Autism Speaks, 30 states currently have enacted some form of legislation.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Brandeis University. “Autism Law, Financial Burdens Leave Families Struggling With Health Care Needs.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 17 Jul. 2012. Web.
18 Jul. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Autism Law, Financial Burdens Leave Families Struggling With Health Care Needs’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Autism and Health Insurance Workshops: your questions answered

Speaking of autism and health insurance:

If you would like to learn more about your children’s rights and how to maximize your insurance coverage, you won’t want to miss one of the following workshops:

Thursday, June 21st at 6:30 pm

Where: Lafayette Library and Learning Center

3491 Mt Diablo Blvd, Lafayette, CA.

925-385-2280

Special education advocate, Bonnie Yates will join FirstSteps for Kids and will cover the current and future status of insurance funding.

CLICK HERE for more information.

ALSO:

Tuesday, JUNE 26,  6PM TO 8PM

Where: RCEB Office, 500 Davis Street, San Leandro, CA.

Feda Alaliti and Karen Fessel will answer your questions about autism and health insurance. With the recent passage of SB 946 and the current insurance settlement agreements, more parents are accessing insurance coverage for their children’s treatment for ASD.

Feda Almaliti is the Executive Director of Autism Health Advocates.  Dr. Karen Fessel is the founder and Executive Director of the Austism Insurance Project.  Both speakers bring firsthand experience to the challenges faced by other parents with children with autism in regards to the complexities of obtaining services through various insurance companies. Ms. Almaliti  and Dr. Fessel were instrumental in the passage of SB 946 – CA Autism Insurance Mandate.

Sponsored by The Regional Center East Bay and Family Resource Network.

Trumpet Behavioral Health is also providing workshops as well. Click HERE to learn more.

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Got  questions? Need resources? Email me here citybights@sfgate.com and I will do my very best to help.

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FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK and TWITTER and read the first three chapters of A REGULAR GUY:GROWING UP WITH AUTISM HERE.

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