Tag Archives: Gross Motor Skills

Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Sandy asks…

rett syndrome-please help!?

Hi all> I asked this question before but didnt get any responses

Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I never had it but wanted to help. This is what my research came up with,
Stage I, called early onset, generally begins between 6 and 18 months of age. Quite frequently, this stage is overlooked because symptoms of the disorder may be somewhat vague, and parents and doctors may not notice the subtle slowing of development at first. The infant may begin to show less eye contact and have reduced interest in toys. There may be delays in gross motor skills such as sitting or crawling. Hand-wringing and decreasing head growth may occur, but not enough to draw attention. This stage usually lasts for a few months but can persist for more than a year.

Stage II, or the rapid destructive stage, usually begins between ages 1 and 4 and may last for weeks or months. This stage may have either a rapid or a gradual onset as purposeful hand skills and spoken language are lost. The characteristic hand movements begin to emerge during this stage and often include wringing, washing, clapping, or tapping, as well as repeatedly moving the hands to the mouth. Hands are sometimes clasped behind the back or held at the sides, with random touching, grasping, and releasing. The movements persist while the child is awake but disappear during sleep. Breathing irregularities such as episodes of apnea and hyperventilation may occur, although breathing is usually normal during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss of social interaction and communication. General irritability and sleep irregularities may be seen. Gait patterns are unsteady and initiating motor movements can be difficult. Slowing of head growth is usually noticed during this stage.

Stage III, also called the plateau or pseudo-stationary stage, usually begins between ages 2 and 10 and can last for years. Apraxia, motor problems, and seizures are prominent during this stage. However, there may be improvement in behavior, with less irritability, crying, and autistic-like features. An individual in stage III may show more interest in her surroundings, and her alertness, attention span, and communication skills may improve. Many girls remain in this stage for most of their lives.

The last stage, stage IV — called the late motor deterioration stage — can last for years or decades and is characterized by reduced mobility. Muscle weakness, rigidity (stiffness), spasticity, dystonia (increased muscle tone with abnormal posturing of extremity or trunk), and scoliosis (curvature of the spine) are other prominent features. Girls who were previously able to walk may stop walking. Generally, there is no decline in cognition, communication, or hand skills in stage IV. Repetitive hand movements may decrease, and eye gaze usually improves.

Hope it helps.

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Schoolyard Designed For Children With Autism

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 09 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
‘Schoolyard Designed For Children With Autism’
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A Kansas State University graduate student is creating a schoolyard that can become a therapeutic landscape for children with autism.

Chelsey King, master’s student in landscape architecture, St. Peters, Mo., is working with Katie Kingery-Page, assistant professor of landscape architecture, to envision a place where elementary school children with autism could feel comfortable and included.

“My main goal was to provide different opportunities for children with autism to be able to interact in their environment without being segregated from the rest of the school,” King said. “I didn’t want that separation to occur.”

The schoolyard can be an inviting place for children with autism, King said, if it provides several aspects: clear boundaries, a variety of activities and activity level spaces, places where the child can go when overstimulated, opportunities for a variety of sensory input without being overwhelming and a variety of ways to foster communication between peers.

“The biggest issue with traditional schoolyards is that they are completely open but also busy and crowded in specific areas,” King said. “This can be too overstimulating for a person with autism.”

King researched ways that she could create an environment where children with autism would be able to interact with their surroundings and their peers, but where they could also get away from overstimulation until they felt more comfortable and could re-enter the activities.

“Through this research, I was able to determine that therapies and activities geared toward sensory stimulation, cognitive development, communication skills, and fine and gross motor skills — which traditionally occur in a classroom setting – could be integrated into the schoolyard,” King said.

King designed her schoolyard with both traditional aspects – such as a central play area – and additional elements that would appeal to children with autism, including: A music garden where children can play with outdoor musical instruments to help with sensory aspects. An edible garden/greenhouse that allows hands-on interaction with nature and opportunities for horticulture therapy. A sensory playground, which uses different panels to help children build tolerances to difference sensory stimulation. A butterfly garden to encourage nature-oriented learning in a quiet place. A variety of alcoves, which provide children with a place to get away when they feel overwhelmed and want to regain control. King created different signs and pictures boards around these schoolyard elements, so that it was easier for children and teachers to communicate about activities. She also designed a series of small hills around the central play areas so that children with autism could have a place to escape and watch the action around them.

“It is important to make the children feel included in the schoolyard without being overwhelmed,” King said. “It helps if they have a place – such as a hill or an alcove – where they can step away from it and then rejoin the activity when they are ready.

King and Kingery-Page see the benefits of this type of schoolyard as an enriching learning environment for all children because it involves building sensory experience and communication.

“Most children spend seven to nine hours per weekday in school settings,” Kingery-Page said. “Designing schoolyards that are educational, richly experiential, with potentially restorative nature contact for children should be a community concern.”

The researchers collaborated with Jessica Wilkinson, a special education teacher who works with children with autism. King designed her schoolyard around Amanda Arnold Elementary School, which is the Manhattan school district’s magnet school for children with autism.

“Although there are no current plans to construct the schoolyard, designing for a real school allowed Chelsey to test principles synthesized from literature against the actual needs of an educational facility,” Kingery-Page said. “Chelsey’s interaction with the school autism coordinator and school principal has grounded her research in the daily challenges of elementary education for students with autism.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. King presented her research, “Therapeutic schoolyard: Design for autism spectrum disorder,” at the recent K-State Research Forum.
Kansas State University Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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‘Schoolyard Designed For Children With Autism’

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Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 23 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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The first prospective study of ethnic differences in the symptoms of autism in toddlers shows that children from a minority background have more delayed language, communication and gross motor skills than Caucasian children with the disorder. Researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute concluded that subtle developmental delays may be going unaddressed in minority toddlers until more severe symptoms develop.

While the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) does not differ across racial and ethnic groups, some studies have shown that children of African American, Hispanic and Asian descent are less likely to receive an early diagnosis of autism than Caucasian children. In this new study, Dr. Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger Institute, investigated whether the symptoms of autism in toddlers play a role in this disparity in diagnosis as part of her work to improve access, education and outreach to minority communities.

“We found the toddlers in the minority group were significantly further behind than the non-minority group in development of language and motor skills and showed more severe autism symptoms in their communication abilities,” says Landa, whose study included children and parents of African American, Asian and Hispanic descent. “It’s really troubling when we look at these data alongside diagnosis statistics because they suggest that children in need of early detection and intervention are not getting it.” (Visit this online discussion with Dr. Landa for more in-depth information.)

The study, published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (Epub ahead of print), examined development in 84 toddlers with ASD at an average 26-28 months of age using three standardized instruments that evaluate child development. Children were evaluated by their caregivers using the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Caregiver Questionnaire (CSBS-DP CQ) and by research clinicians using the Mullen Scales of Early Learning and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS). After controlling for participants’ socioeconomic status, all three tools indicated a significant difference between minority and non-minority children.

Previous studies published by Dr. Landa and her colleagues at Kennedy Krieger show that detection of ASD is possible at as early as 14 months of age. While early diagnosis is crucial for accessing intervention services, studies examining children from minority groups suggest considerable delays in the diagnosis of ASD in these children relative to their Caucasian peers.

Dr. Landa points to cultural differences in what communities perceive as typical and atypical development in young children, the relationships between families and respected community physicians, and the stigma that some cultures place on disability as areas where education and awareness could have meaningful impact.

“Addressing cultural influences gives us a clear target to improve service delivery to minority children, but these findings may also suggest biological and other culturally-related differences between Caucasian and minority children with autism,” says Landa. “There are other complex diseases that present differently in different ethnic groups and more research is needed to investigate this possibility.”

The findings of this research prompted Dr. Landa and her team to begin a study that will document the age at which minority parents first noticed signs of developmental disruption in their children, the specific nature of the behavior that concerned them, and the children’s intervention history. Additional research is also needed to study group-specific differences in the presentation of autism symptoms between a variety of minority groups.

“Although questions remain on why these differences exist, by taking steps to develop more culturally-sensitive screening and assessment practices, with a special focus on educating parents, clinicians and health educators, I believe we can empower parents to identify early warning signs and ensure minority children have the same access to services as their Caucasian peers,” says Landa.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Support for this study was provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration, National Institutes of Health and the Krieger Foundation.
Kennedy Krieger Institute Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Kennedy Krieger Institute. “Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 23 Feb. 2012. Web.
9 Mar. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Harold Rongey, Ph.D. on 24 Feb 2012 at 1:01 pm

In my studies I have observed three problems among the minority parents:
1. They do not know how to cook simple foods
2. They often are with the WIC program that I have found the diet lacking in brain nutrients
3. They lack sufficient income to provide an adequate diet—mostly because they do not have proper nutritional understanding of what the child needs to be healthy.

| post followup | alert a moderator |


‘Minority Toddlers With Autism May Be More Delayed Than Affected Caucasian Peers’

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Young With Autism – Neurofeedback Therapy For Autism And Asperger’s Syndrome

Young With Autism

Most people cannot relate to the profound challenges of life with autism. But if this is somewhat you are all too familiar with, you are naturally interested in any kind of therapy who has shown promise and am able to be depleted to tweak the life of a friend or loved one. One these care for autism and Asperger’s syndrome is neurofeedback. Young With Autism

Consider the case of a 14-year-old girl named Carly, whose story was featured on 20/20. At a very young age, she had been diagnosed with autism, and had been written off as being mentally incompetent. As she grew, her body flopped and flailed and her tantrums were continuous, but her parents refused to give up. They worked 40-60 hours a week with Carly. Progress was slow, but their love for their daughter impelled them to persist.

Then, one day, at the age of 11, Carly sat down at a computer and, typing one finger at a time, revealed that there was a very intelligent young lady buried beneath the outward persona she presented verbally and physically. She was not “stupid” or “retarded”; she was a very bright girl with real emotions. Carly may have single-handedly changed the way the world views people with severe forms of autism. She is now writing a novel. Young With Autism

Another astounding case is that of an eight-year-old boy diagnosed with autism. He had a very limited vocabulary, and did not like to be touched. After 98 sessions of neurofeedback therapy, his parents were thrilled to observe several positive changes. His medications were cut in half, his speech patterns slowed down and became easier to understand, and his memorized speech gave way to some original thoughts and ideas. They saw significant improvement in his gross motor skills and balance. He became more stable emotionally, and he even began initiating touch and asking for hugs. He also interacts much better with his brothers and sisters.

Neurofeedback is a method of training the brain to function differently. During the sessions, the therapist will attach very thin leads that conduct and transmit the electrical energy from the brain to various locations on the patient’s scalp. Young With Autism

A special gel is used to comfortably hold the leads in place. The patient will then use brain waves to alter what is happening to a visual display on a computer screen. Through positive reinforcement, the brain learns to progressively use the desired waves, and eventually the changes in brain function may become permanent. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Young With Autism program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Young With Autism is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Do You Think Asperger’s Syndrome A Bleak Future?

Named for Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger, Asperger’s Syndrome was initially diagnosed in 1944 when Dr. Asperger began to describe kids who were lacking in nonverbal communication skills, demonstrated restricted peer empathy, and were clumsy. Though several queries stay regarding completely different aspects of the disorder, it absolutely was standardized as a diagnosis approximately fifty years later.

A subgroup of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD), Asperger’s Syndrome may appear to be a mild type of autism. Not like most individuals with autism, however, several individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome might have “normal” intelligence. Because Asperger’s Syndrome and autism share some traits, a misdiagnosis is easy to make. Because of this, youngsters who are suspected of getting these conditions should be closely evaluated to make certain the diagnosis is correct.

Individuals who have Asperger’s Syndrome begin to exhibit symptoms in childhood, where eccentric behaviour and poor social skills begin to isolate the child. He has difficulty with conversations and non-verbal cues. Speech may be perceived as peculiar because of infection abnormalities and a repetitive tendency. He may appear clumsy in speech and in gross motor skills. Many times he might become utterly engrossed in a specific interest to the exclusion of all else, i.e., counting the quantity of yellow cars that pass, taking part with only trains, or watching solely Google Earth on television.

The etiology of Asperger’s Syndrome is unknown, though it is believed to be genetic or be an inherited trait. Kids who have Asperger’s could conjointly have attention deficit disorder (ADD), schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or depression. For that reason, a psychiatrist will often be necessary throughout the lifetime of a kid with Asperger’s Syndrome. Create a trusting relationship with a psychiatrist early, since it can be a lot easier for him to create a swift assessment of any change in temperament or symptoms if the psychiatrist includes a long history with an individual with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Because of his intensive coaching and experience, a kid or adolescent psychiatrist is best ready to evaluate PDDs like Asperger’s Syndrome or autism. He is additionally in a position to style a family-specific treatment program that is specifically applicable and effective for the child. An efficient treatment might be a mix of psychotherapy, behaviour modification, special education, and family support. Medication might be of profit to some youngsters with Asperger’s Syndrome.

For kids with Asperger’s Syndrome, the longer term is mostly considered more promising these days. The future is definitely not hopeless or bleak. Those with Asperger’s Syndrome are usually able to complete high college and a few will be able to attend college. Although the anomalies in social interaction continue, many can develop mutually beneficial relationships with family and/or friends. Marriage and becoming a taking part parent are potentialities too.

If you wish to understand what you wish to do when your child has been clinically determined with aspergers, then visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com and take guidance from Dave Angel.
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Asperger’s Syndrome Explained In Detail

Like autism, Asperger’s syndrome belongs to a set of disorders known as pervasive developmental disorders. A kid with Asperger’s will usually have problems with social skills and will find it tough to interact normally with other children. Like a kid with Autism, Asperger’s children usually prefer rigid routines and dislike change. Not like a child with Autism, a child with Asperger’s syndrome can typically begin to talk before the age of two years old, following the traditional pattern of speech development. Asperger’s syndrome is extraordinarily rare, affecting only regarding 3 people in 10,000. The causes of Asperger’s syndrome are largely unknown, though it does seem to run in families.

Some symptoms to look for are:

• Issue expressing feelings, or difficulty noticing the sentiments of others.
• Likes rigid routines and has problem with change.
• Could not understand social norms, like not looking at others, keeping personal area boundaries, and making good eye contact whereas speaking.
• Could speak in a very formal style or in an exceedingly flat and inflectionless monotone.
• Might have trouble with each fine and gross motor skills.
• Could be bothered by robust sensory stimuli, like loud noises, bright lights, or strong smells or tastes.

If you suspect your child might have Asperger’s syndrome, you ought to discuss your considerations with your kid’s doctor. She will go over problems in your child’s development. Your kid may be observed by a specialist who will check your kid in numerous areas like IQ, speech and motor skills, social skills, and more.

Treatment for Asperger’s syndrome typically involves varied occupational and behavioural therapy techniques. Therapy will be tailored to the individual kid depending on the symptoms he is exhibiting. Several children with Asperger’s additionally have other conditions, like ADHD or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, which require medication. Schools are required by Federal law to give special instructional programs for children with special needs. These programs will help an Asperger’s kid to better cope with his or her symptoms.

At home it’s best to play to your child’s strengths. Strict routines ought to be adhered to so as to supply a sense of security and to avoid tantrums. If your kid is particularly advanced in an field, like reading or art, offer lots of opportunities to relish those skills. Role-playing is also important to help your kid practice the social skills those with Asperger’s syndrome are missing.

Long-term prognosis for Asperger’s syndrome is good. Though there is no cure for Asperger’s syndrome, with early intervention children with the syndrome usually go on to be adults who can manage well in society. Adults with Asperger’s syndrome have gone on to be successful within the fields of math, engineering, and science, among others and have often created nice contributions to human history.

If you would like to understand what you would like to do when your kid has been diagnosed with aspergers, then visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com and take guidance from Dave Angel.
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