Tag Archives: Genetics

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Sharon asks…

A question about genetics. I have a child with ?

PDD-NOS, which is an autism spectrum disorder. I’ve read that normally people have a 1 in 150 chance of having a child with autism, but it jumps up to 1 in 20 for people who already have an autistic child.

My question is, does anyone know what my chances would be of having a child with classic autism or Rett‘s syndrome? I’m not worried about having a child with PDD-NOS or Aspergers, but I do have concerns about having a child with classic autism.
Hi Sally! Last July my son had been checked for Fragile X since he not only has PDD, but also scored low on a few I.Q. tests and has hyper-flexibility in his joints. However, he was not found to have this condition. I thank God, because I was terrified.

He’s seeing the genetics counselor again next Monday (for what, I do not know) but when I had asked the doctor the question, I didn’t receive much more than an answer that I have around a 1 in 20 chance of having another child with an ASD, but wasn’t informed on the risk for having one with classic autism. I was just hoping that possibly someone here knew the risk.

admin answers:

Hi …I am not sure but i was told i ‘might’ have another child with autism if i were to have another baby, i know a lady who has three children two girls and a boy the two older girls both have autism one more severe than the other the boy doesn’t have problems, so i would say yes there is always a chance

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia Causes

Mary asks…

What causes schizophrenia?

Like iv said be for i have bad schizophrenia,but i wont to know what causes it,i mean im only 14. 🙁

admin answers:

A cause hasn’t been found. There are theories about genetics, environment, and other things but right now it is idiopathic. It has also been theorized that it could be an auto-immune disease, but there is still no known cause.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms 18 Months

Chris asks…

Can my son develop autism after 2 years of age?

My nephew was misdiagnosed for many years. Finally, at age 10 they figured out he had high level autism. They thought he had speech issues and sent him to classes for years. My son, now 18 months old, doesn’t have any of the symptoms that I’ve been reading online. My question is, could he develop autism say after 2 years of age. So far, all I’ve read for signs and symptoms go up to age 2.

-No big smiles or other warm, joyful expressions by six months or thereafter

-No back-and-forth sharing of sounds, smiles, or other facial expressions by nine months or thereafter

-No babbling by 12 months

-No back-and-forth gestures, such as pointing, showing, reaching, or waving by 12 months

-No words by 16 months

-No two-word meaningful phrases (without imitating or repeating) by 24 months

-Any loss of speech or babbling or social skills at any age

So far, he can do all these. Should I not worry?

admin answers:

There are various classifications and degrees of autism. Some are unable to talk conversationally, while others have virtually no ability to speak.

Autism varies widely in its severity and symptoms and may go unrecognized, especially in mildly affected children.

Many people with Autim also have unusual ways of learning, paying attention, or reacting to different sensations. The thinking and learning abilities of people with Autim can vary – from gifted to severely challenged.

Autism begins before the age of 3 and lasts throughout a person’s life. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups and is four times more likely to occur in boys than girls.

Scientists aren’t certain what causes autism, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Signs In 15 Month Old

Laura asks…

How early are the signs of autism?

And are they linked to vaccines

admin answers:

For some autism they are born with and signs are immediate. A child may not like to be held and squirm to be put down, they don’t smile or sustain eyecontact.

For those that develop autism the signs can start showing before 12 months. I have a son that was dx at 9 months. He did not answer to his name, and repetitively played with the same toy, he was a picky eater, and avoided eyecontact. He is not vaccinated. He has a dx of PDD.NOS

My oldest son developed autism later he also is PDD.NOS and was typical through 15 months. He was vaccinated through age 2.

Is autism linked to vaccines? Autism is an autoimmune disorder, and autoimmune disorders in general are on the rise epidemically especially allergies. I believe that vaccines contribute. The overload of toxins on an immature dysfunctional immune system can manifest in all kinds of ways like autism, allergies, bipolar, ADD/HD ect. Genetics are an integral component. So my answer would be yes indirectly autism can be linked to vaccines in some cases. So can a virus, oxygen deprivation during birth resulting in TBI traumatic brain injury, there seems to be an Rh connection in mothers of autistic children, also many moms fail the triple screen when pregnant who go on to have autistic children. There are so many correlations, its very complex.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome

Susan asks…

What would I go to school for if I was looking for a career in ?

finding cures for people with conditions caused by genetic mutations ( example rett syndrome is a nuerological disorder caused by a gene mutaion – so would you go for nureology or genetic medicine?)

Thank you !

admin answers:

If the schools you’re looking into offer undergrads programs in neurology or genetics then those would be awesome for the fields your planing to go through. But in reality you’d have to get a phD or at least your masters to do any decent research in labs. You can also head into biology and just focus your work load in genetics. It’s best to ask the guidance councilor at the school for your best options. Good luck

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia Causes

Mary asks…

What causes Schizophrenia besides genetics?

How do you know if some has Schizophrenia?

admin answers:

There are multiple theories on why someone develops schizophrenia this is called ‘heterogeneous’ origin. While there are clear examples of it being inheritable others may have a predisposition that requires an environmental trigger.
During times of famine the incidence of schizophrenia can double and the current theory is that this is socondary to low folate in the diet of the mother. Fortunately with international aid, famines are not as common as they have been historically.
Since schizophrenia is slightly more common in the Northern Hemisphere and slightly more common in late spring births and infective agent was suspected at one time. I don’t know if this is still an area of active research.
Heavy metal toxicity and in particular mercury can cause or worsen symptoms.
The bottom-line may be that there are problems with the inherent antioxidant systems in the neurons that ultimately are supposed to control levels of dopamine. An abundance of dopamine can be neurotoxic. It is the combination to these two things that produce the symptoms.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Asperger Syndrome In Adults

George asks…

Is there a connection between people who watch cartoons and people with disabilities?

Is there a connection between people who watch cartoons and people with learning or mental disabilities like Aspergers syndrome, or Autism?

admin answers:

No not all. I have two disabilities autism and epilepsy, but I was born with them as mine was caused by genetics. Some disabilities are not even visible by the naked eye, but I don’t watch cartoons and I also know people with disabilities who don’t and people without disabilities who do. So that’s not necessarily true, even then there’s cartoons which are designed for adults, so basically it varies with everyone personal preference. Everyone’s an individual, there’s no one out there that exactly the same, it would be a boring old world if we were and most disabilities does not effect what you watch on TV. For example autism a communication problem epilepsy is where you have fits and often wet yourself so top top and bottom the answer no.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism

George asks…

What is the best current explanation for autism?

I asked my psychology professor about what causes autism from a neurological perspective, and he said that if he could answer that question, he’d get a Nobel Prize. However, there must be many hypotheses regarding this question, so which one is the most plausible?

admin answers:

It’s principally genetic, (but not one single “gene for autism!) though there seems to be some variation which requires the influence of environmental factors.
The two most considered at present are variations in womb temperature, and in foetal steroid and non-steroid hormones,
(not toxins or infections, diseases etc.)
Neither of these strands have progressed beyond hypothesis, unless my reading is out-of-date.

I’m working from information in Simon-Baron Cohen’s Autism and Asperger Syndrome (2009)
He cites six strands of evidence pointing to genetics as the major and critical component.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Schizophrenia Causes

Laura asks…

Is there evidence yet on what causes schizophrenia?

The big theory is that it is caused by genetics and the environment, but what are the percentages?
And how exactly is it caused by the environment? Or is it purely due to stress from childbirth?

admin answers:

Schizophrenia is a chemical imbalance in the brain that causes the patient to suffer from uncontrolled delusions and hallucinations.
This chemical imbalance is controlled with daily medication that has to be regulated for a lifetime.
Compare this to diabetes, which is a biochemical imbalance within the metabolic system of the body. It, too has to be regulated with medication and diet for a lifetime. Schizophrenia is the same thing.

There is a very strong genetic tendency toward this illness but still, not much is known about it because money for medical research mostly goes to cancer research instead of mental health research. But the medications have come a long, long way these days and are more easily tolerated and more effective than ever before.
Oddly, identical twins may have one who develops schizophrenia and the other does not. And consider the fact that the two are genetically identical. And so this baffles science. However, it is believed that schizophrenia is not a primary inherited disorder.
Good question.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

George asks…

Poll: Do you think vaccines cause or contribute to autism?

I’m curious to see what people really think.

admin answers:

No i dont believe they do whatsoever! I think parents are just being over cautious and flipping out for no reason. Vaccines have been around for ages, and now they are trying to say that it causes autisim? I dont think so. Dont you think there would have been more causes of that if it was actually linked to the vaccines. Its the same vaccine schedule, its not like the vaccines have changed much in the last 50 years.

Autism and autism spectrum disorders are complex neurodevelopmental disorders.Heritability contributes about 90% of the risk of a child developing autism, but the genetics of autism are complex and typically it is unclear which genes are responsible.Many other causes have been proposed, such as exposure of children to vaccines; these proposals are controversial and the vaccine hypotheses have no convincing scientific evidence.

Autism is a condition involving abnormalities of brain development and behavior which manifests itself before a child is three years old and has a steady course with no remission. It is characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, as well as restricted and repetitive behavior. It is part of a larger family called the autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), which include closely related syndromes such as Asperger syndrome and PDD-NOS. This article uses autism to denote the classic autistic disorder and ASD to denote the wider family.

Autism’s theory of causation is still incomplete. It has long been presumed that there is a common cause at the genetic, cognitive, and neural levels for autism’s characteristic triad of symptoms. However,here is increasing suspicion among researchers that autism does not have a single cause, but is instead a complex disorder with a set of core aspects that have distinct causes. Although these distinct causes have been hypothesized to often co-occur, it has also been suggested that the correlation between the causes has been exaggerated.The number of people known to have autism has increased dramatically since the 1980s, at least partly due to changes in diagnostic practice; it is unknown whether prevalence has increased as well. An increase in prevalence would suggest directing more attention and funding toward changing environmental factors instead of continuing to focus on genetics.

The consensus among mainstream autism researchers is that genetic factors predominate, but some are concerned, as one anonymous researcher put it, that “geneticists are running the show, and ignoring the environmental aspects.”Environmental factors that have been claimed to contribute to autism or exacerbate its symptoms, or may be important to consider in future research, include certain foods, infectious disease, heavy metals, solvents, diesel exhaust, PCBs, phthalates and phenols used in plastic products, pesticides, brominated flame retardants, alcohol, smoking, illicit drugs, and vaccines. Among these factors, vaccines have attracted much attention, as parents may first become aware of autistic symptoms in their child around the time of a routine vaccination, and parental concern about vaccines has led to a decreasing uptake of childhood immunizations and an increasing likelihood of measles outbreaks. However, as described in Mercury and MMR vaccine below, there is overwhelming scientific evidence showing no causal association between the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and autism, and there is no scientific evidence that the vaccine preservative thiomersal helps cause autism.

In 2007 the National Institutes of Health announced an Autism Centers of Excellence (ACE) research program to find the causes of autism and identify new treatments for the disorder. Initial recipients are focusing on genetic factors, brain imaging, brain chemicals and functions including mirror neurons, effect on early parent-child behavior on autism, and learning in autistic children.
Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causes_of_autism

I am a mother of a 12 month old boy… Who is up to date on all his vaccines so far. And he will continue to get all his vaccinations. As so will any other children i should have. Im sorry but i wouldnt take the risk of my child actually contracting one of those disease just because some parents believe that it may be linked to autisim. Sorry, i would rather have my child vaccinated.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers