Tag Archives: Gaze

Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

John asks…

Could my 2 yr old son have autism?

I have a 2 yr old boy an he doesent talk yet, well nothing pastt mama baba. He throws servere tantrems sometimes I dont even know why he is so upset. he loves to run and seems completly absessed with cars but thats really all he plays with he shows little intrest in other toys. when he watches tv its like he gets sucked into it and cant take his gaze off. Most of the time when i speak to him he aks like he cant hear me and continues what he is doing and if i interupt him he starts screamng. I have never seen any other children his age throw tantrums as often and the way he does, he will throw hisself on the floor an sometimes he hurts hisself doing this. He had a really bad fibril sezure when he was one and has had 2 very small ones since. but i am really getting concerned because of his behavior and speech problems.
Yes my son has had his hearing tested. i also read that many autistic kids have servere allergies and bowel problems. my son is allerigic to milk products. and was also diagnosed with the childhood form of irritable bowel. as far as communication, well evey morning when we get up i have to pick him up so he can look to see what he wants then he either points or grabs what he wants. he turned two on june2 i dont plan on having him tested untill he is at least 3. i dont want to jump to conclushions. but alot of friends and family have sudgested i have him checked for autism

admin answers:

Characteristics

Autism is distinguished by a pattern of symptoms rather than one single symptom. The main characteristics are impairments in social interaction, impairments in communication, restricted interests and repetitive behavior. Other aspects, such as atypical eating, are also common but are not essential for diagnosis.[19]

[edit] Social development

Autistic people have social impairments and often lack the intuition about others that many people take for granted. Noted autistic Temple Grandin described her inability to understand the social communication of neurotypicals as leaving her feeling “like an anthropologist on Mars”.[20]

Social impairments become apparent early in childhood and continue through adulthood. Autistic infants show less attention to social stimuli, smile and look at others less often, and respond less to their own name. Autistic toddlers have more striking social deviance; for example, they have less eye contact and anticipatory postures and are less likely to use another person’s hand or body as a tool.[18] Three- to five-year-old autistic children are less likely to exhibit social understanding, approach others spontaneously, imitate and respond to emotions, communicate nonverbally, and take turns with others. However, they do form attachments to their primary caregivers.[21] They display moderately less attachment security than usual, although this feature disappears in children with higher mental development or less severe ASD.[22] Older children and adults with ASD perform worse on tests of face and emotion recognition.[23]

Contrary to common belief, autistic children do not prefer to be alone. Making and maintaining friendships often proves to be difficult for those with autism. For them, the quality of friendships, not the number of friends, predicts how lonely they are.[24]

There are many anecdotal reports, but few systematic studies, of aggression and violence in individuals with ASD. The limited data suggest that in children with mental retardation, autism is associated with aggression, destruction of property, and tantrums. Dominick et al. Interviewed the parents of 67 children with ASD and reported that about two-thirds of the children had periods of severe tantrums and about one third had a history of aggression, with tantrums significantly more common than in children with a history of language impairment.[25]

[edit] Communication

About a third to a half of individuals with autism do not develop enough natural speech to meet their daily communication needs.[26] Differences in communication may be present from the first year of life, and may include delayed onset of babbling, unusual gestures, diminished responsiveness, and the desynchronization of vocal patterns with the caregiver. In the second and third years, autistic children have less frequent and less diverse babbling, consonants, words, and word combinations; their gestures are less often integrated with words. Autistic children are less likely to make requests or share experiences, and are more likely to simply repeat others’ words (echolalia)[17][27] or reverse pronouns.[28] Autistic children may have difficulty with imaginative play and with developing symbols into language.[17][27] They are more likely to have problems understanding pointing; for example, they may look at a pointing hand instead of the pointed-at object.[18][27]

In a pair of studies, high-functioning autistic children aged 8–15 performed equally well, and adults better than individually matched controls at basic language tasks involving vocabulary and spelling. Both autistic groups performed worse than controls at complex language tasks such as figurative language, comprehension and inference. As people are often sized up initially from their basic language skills, these studies suggest that people speaking to autistic individuals are more likely to overestimate what their audience comprehends

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Infants

Donna asks…

can autism be detected before the symptoms start?

i have a project due friday on autism and this is one of the questions

admin answers:

No at this point. There are no genetic or biological tests doctors can use to detect autism. Even though it’s a neurological disorder, it is still diagnosed based on someone’s behavior and symptoms. Researchers are working on early intervention programs that detect subtle signs of autism early in infancy, however. Some symptoms, like abnormal eye contact, may be present at just one month of age.

In response to Jerry: The symptoms don’t “start” when a person is a few years old. For one thing, the symptoms must be apparent by the age of 3. And the symptoms are still present even if they are not interpreted as symptoms. When I was just a couple months old, my parents noticed that I didn’t make eye contact or follow their gaze, but they didn’t think it was anything to be concerned about. Symptoms in infants are very subtle and easily overlooked, which is why the diagnosis is typically made around age 3, once the symptoms are more obvious.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Infants

Mandy asks…

When can you diagnose autism in a baby?

And what are the signs and symptoms?

admin answers:

From these studies, five distinct areas of development are flagged for consideration. All parents should consider these “Big Five” if they suspect that their child may have autism.

1) Does the baby respond to his or her name when called by the caregiver? Within the first few months of life, babies respond to their own name by orienting toward the person who called them. Typical babies are very responsive to the voices of familiar people, and often respond with smiles and looks.

In contrast, infants later diagnosed with autism often fail to respond to their own name. That is, when called by name, they tend to turn and look at the person only about 20% of the time as found- in the videotaped one year-old birthday parties of children with autism. They also are often selectively responsive to sounds. They may ignore some sounds and respond to others that are of the same loudness. Thus, they may fail to respond to their parent calling their name, but immediately respond to the television being turned on. It is not unusual for parents to suspect their child has a hearing loss.

2) Does the young child engage in “joint attention”? Near the end of the first year of life, most infants begin to join with their caregivers in looking at the same object or event. To aid in this process of “joint attention”, typical infants begin to shift their gaze from toys to people, follow other’s points, monitor the gaze of others, point to objects or events to share interest, and show toys to others. These behaviors have a distinct sharing quality to them. For example, the young infant may point to an airplane flying over head, and look to the parent, as if to say, “do you see that!”

In contrast, young children with autism have particular difficulties in jointly attending with others. They rarely follow another’s points, do not often shift their gaze back and forth from objects to people, and do not seem to share “being with” the caregiver as they watch and talk about objects, people, or events. They also tend not to “show” a toy to the parent.

3) Does the child imitate others? Typical infants are mimics. Very young infants can imitate facial movements (e.g., sticking out their tongue). As early as 8-10 months, mothers and infants say the same sounds one after another, or clap or make other movements. Indeed, imitation is a major part of such common infant games as pat-a-cake and So Big (“How big is baby? Soooo big!” as infant raises hands to sky).

Young children with autism, however, less often imitate others. They show less imitation of body and facial movements (waving, making faces, playing infant games), and less imitation with objects.

4) Does the child respond emotionally to others? Typical infants are socially responsive to others. They smile when others smile at them, and they initiate smiles and laughs when playing with toys and others. When typical infants observe another child crying, they may cry themselves, or looked concerned. Somewhat older infants may crawl near the person, pat, or in other ways offer comfort. These latter behaviors are suggestive of empathy and are commonly observed among children in the second year of life.

In contrast, children with autism may seem unaware of the emotions of others. They may not take notice of the social smiles of others, and thus may not look and smile in response to other’s smiles. They also may ignore the distress of others. Several researchers have now shown that when an adult feigns pain and distress after hitting herself with a toy, or banging her knee, young children with autism are less likely to look at the adult, or show facial concern.

5) Does the baby engage in pretend play? Someone once noted that “play is the work of children.” Young children love to pretend-to be a mother, father, or baby, to be a firefighter or police officer. Although children start to play with toys around six months or so, play does not take on a pretend quality until the end of the first year. Their first actions may involve pretending to feed themselves, their mother or a doll, brush the doll’s hair, or wipe the doll’s nose. Nearer their second birthday, children engage in truly imaginative play as dolls may take on human qualities of talking or engaging in household routines. Children may pretend that a sponge is a piece of food, a block is a hat, or a plastic bowl is a swimming pool that contains water.

In contrast, the play of children with autism may be lacking in several ways. The young child may not be interested in objects at all, paying more attention to the movement of his hands, or a piece of string. If interested in toys, only certain ones may catch his interest, and these may be used in a repetitive way that is not consistent with how most children would play with the toy. They may be more interested in turning a toy car upside down and spinning the wheels than pushing the car back and forth. Overall, pretend qualities are nearly absent in the play of children with autism under 2 years of age.

It is important to note that in each of the 5 areas we have flagged, we are most concerned with behaviors that are absent or occur at very low rates. The absence of certain behaviors may be more difficult to pinpoint than the presence of atypical behaviors. But concerns in any of the above areas should prompt a parent to investigate screening their child for autism. Several screening measures are now available, and information from the screener will help to determine if the parent should pursue further evaluations. If the parent is convinced their child has autism, then they should seek an evaluation with an expert in autism. Most likely, this evaluation will involve an interview with the parents to obtain a complete developmental history of the child, and direct observations of the child in different situations.

Luckily, Timmy and his parents were able to get the diagnosis of autism before Timmy’s third birthday. They began intensive treatment with Timmy, and he made immediate progress. They are hoping for the best outcome, and feel confident that his early diagnosis was critical in getting him the help he needs to reach his potential.

Http://www.bridges4kids.org/articles/1-03/EP12-02.html

or
http://www.mugsy.org/pmh.htm

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Autism, parenting and feeling judged

I saw a woman at the gym the other day that I really wanted to avoid.

I used to see her a lot when Matthew was small. It seemed she was always there when he was bolting away from me at the grocery store, the swimming pool, the park. She watched me as I tackled Matthew before he wandered into the street, and while I tried to defuse a big bad meltdown. She was always sitting right behind us in church while Matthew flapped and tapped and giggled. Her pale blue eyes followed us everywhere and her frown was constant.

I wove my way around the exercise bikes and ducked behind the magazine rack to avoid the woman, and then ran smack into her in front of the drinking fountain. She was wearing that frown that I remembered well, and her eyes bored into me in such a way that I couldn’t pretend to avert her gaze.

“You look familiar,” she said, cocking her head. No kidding I look familiar. “Did our kids go to school together or something?”

“Maybe,” I countered innocently, “I think we may have seen each other at the pool.”

“Of course!” she said smiling, her frown softening ever so slightly.  ”You had that adorable boy. I remember he had…issues.”

I laughed self consciously and explained that Matthew had autism and that some years had been more challenging than others. I told her that he was 26 now, living and working in this great community for people with disabilities near Santa Cruz called Camphill California.

“I’ll never forget the day he climbed to the top of the batting cage during a little league game,” she said, shuddering, ” he was teetering around and you climbed up like it was nothing and carried him down.”

We burst out laughing and went on to talk about how her children were doing, the ones I never got to know because I was so sure their mother was evil. What a waste! Here was this really nice and compassionate woman who I assumed was judging me when in reality she was just curious. And concerned. Even now when she was laughing with me she was frowning. She was a frowner, not a judger! And who knew why she was a frowner? She may have been coping with “issues” of her own.

As we parted ways, I thought about all of the other people over the years that I had judged–and avoided– because I assumed they were judging me.

I thought back to the day I climbed to the top of the batting cage to retrieve Matthew. And to the day I ran into the surf in Carmel fully clothed to pull him from the surf. And to the day I sprinted down my street in red high heels and a black cocktail dress as Matthew rolled away precariously on a skateboard. We were stare-worthy in those days!

If you are an autism parent, you know what I am talking about. It’s not easy to be on stage during tense moments like these. Still, the next time you think some one is judging you, try taking a step back.

They might actually be admiring you.

***

Do you have questions? Contact me HERE and I will do my very best to help.

FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

***

The Marin and North Bay Autism Lecture Series starts Sept. 19. (more about that soon) but CLICK HERE to learn more and register.

The Morgan Autism Center Conference is coming soon, too. CLICK HERE to learn more.

View the original article here

Early Autism Symptoms – The 4 Early Autism Signs In Infants Every Parent Must Know

Early Autism Symptoms

Autism is a brain development disorder which causes problems in social interaction, communication and the general behavior of the affected child. The early autism signs in infants start to appear as early as six months but typically infants are diagnosed only upon reaching 3 years old.

It is important for parents to be aware of the early autism signs in infants. Early identification is important so that interventions can be implemented and parents can also seek advice and help from experts and from autism organizations. Babies suspected to have the disorder should be observed further and must be checked by pediatricians or autism experts. Early intervention is important to the success of the different treatments for children with autism. This is the reason why it is best for parents to know the early autism signs in infants.

Here are the 4 early autism signs in infants every parent must know: Early Autism Symptoms
Unusual interaction with others This is the most common of all the early autism signs in infants. Autism impairs the social development of a person. Hence, babies with autism have an unusual way of connecting with others. Upon reaching 6 months, normal infants can already interact with others. This is the period when they start smiling, pointing objects of interest, babbling, and making eye contact. On the other hand, autistic infants do not smile as much and have unusual gestures and facial expressions. It is also apparent that they look at other people differently. Their gaze tends to be brief and out of the corner of the eye. They also do not want to be cuddled as much even by their own parents and prefer to be alone than with other infants.

Have a repetitive and restricted behavior Autistic persons have difficulty in adapting to changes. They like doing things the same way and eat the same type of foods for a long period of time. They also develop a fascination over a single object, toy, or pattern. It is also evident when they display strange repetitive movements. They like banging their head, rocking their body, and flapping their hands. Some of these movements can inflict self-injuries. Early Autism Symptoms

Lack of interest in the surroundings Several studies conducted showed that babies with autism react differently when confronted with certain situations. When presented with a toy, they display less enthusiasm and less effort in grabbing it. Instead they become conscious and stare at the object differently. Other signs include not responding to one’s name and are unaffected by audible changes in the environment. This is why autism is sometimes associated with hearing disorder.

Extremely irritable mood Infants with autism often have difficulties controlling their emotions. They cry and get irritated a lot. Although they are disinterested in their surroundings, there are times when they easily get provoked even by the slightest sound. They also get irritated even if their parents are cuddling them or even if they are just playing alone.
If you observe most of the early autism signs in infants in your own child, it is best if you consult a pediatrician or an expert immediately. The effects of autism can be minimized by adopting early intervention programs. Early Autism Symptoms

Early Autism Symptoms is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.Try the program and change child’s life forever!”
Article Source

Useful Tips About Aspergers Syndrome

Parents will usually recognize symptoms of Asperger’s syndrome when a kid starts playgroup and begins interacting with other children. A kid with Asperger’s syndrome might:

Be unable to pick up on social cues such as reading another person’s body language, beginning or maintaining a chat, or how to take turns when talking.

Dislike any change to conventional practices.

Not appear to show empathy.

Be unable to figure out delicate differences in accent, pitch or speech tones that change the meaning of speech. For instance, the kid may not recognize a joke, or might take cynical comments practically.

Speak in a monotone or be otherwise tough to understand because the speech lacks variation in tone, pitch, and accent.

Use a formal manner of speech that is odd for his or her age group. For example, your kid might use the word “return” instead of “come back” or the word “beckon” instead of “call”

Avoid all eye contact

Gaze at things or other individuals for long periods of time.

Have odd postures, stances, or facial expressions.

Be possessively preoccupied with just one activity, to the point of near-encyclopaedia wisdom. Lots of children with a diagnosis of Asperger’s syndrome may also be overly involved in strange behavior like designing bridges, or cataloging and arranging toys in a specific way. They might also show an very narrow interest in one or two particular topics such as dinosaurs, monster movies or robots.

Talk constantly, with most conversations being one-sided.

Verbalize internal thoughts frequently.

Have delays in coordination or other motor development.

Be late in learning to utilize eating apparatus, catching objects, or walking without an awkward gait.

Be prone to over-stimulation from bright lights, loud noises, big crowds, strong tastes or textures.

A kid who displays one or more of the symptoms listed above may not essentially also have Asperger’s syndrome. A child must exhibit a combination of several of the above symptoms, along with unusual or severe trouble in social situations so as to be diagnosed with Asperger syndrome.

Although this condition shares some similarities with autism, children diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome often have normal intellectual development. Kids with Asperger’s syndrome will typically also make more of an effort to take part in activities and interact with others than a child with autism.

If you want to grasp what you need to do when your child has been diagnosed with aspergers, then visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com and take guidance from Dave Angel.
Article Source

Signs Of Autism Infants – Infants That Need Special Care

Signs Of Autism Infants

Experts are now getting better at recognizing the early autism signs. Infants as young as 6 months are now known to display some of these signs. Autism does not affect only the child, but the rest of the family as well. In one study, it was discovered that the siblings of an autistic child also had behavioral problems like aggressiveness, acting out, and attention deficiency.

Autism experts encourage parents to observe their babies for signs that would indicate autism and other disorders. This will greatly help the development of the child as early programs and therapies will be conducted. Upon noticing the early autism signs, infants must be evaluated immediately by their doctors.

Here are the most common autism signs infants displays:

Do Not Babble or Have difficulty Communicating
Upon reaching 12 months, infants are expected to babble or baby talk. They should also start using single words by 16 months and two-word phrases by 24 month. If your baby is not able to do produce these words, you must bring this to the attention of the pediatrician to check if your child has hearing disorder or other problems.

Do Not Point or Make Other Similar Gestures
Infants about 9 months old should be able to point at things that interest them. These may include colorful or shiny things, moving objects, or things that produces sounds. Signs Of Autism Infants

Do Not Make Eye contact
This is one of the most common autism signs. Infants with autism would look away if you try to make eye contact with them. Their gaze is also unusual and brief.

Display Lack of Interest in People and Objects
This is one of the distinct features of an autistic infant. They have no interest in most things and would just stare in blank. There are even times when they are disinterested in their parents and do not want to be touched or cuddled. They do not turn their head when their names are being called and do not even smile at their parents.
Some also are not interested in toys, or do not play the toy like it is supposed to. They tend to focus on parts and not the whole toy, like the wheel of car. Signs Of Autism Infants

Repetitive Movements
Infants with autism like doing things over and over again. You may notice them flapping, head-banging or rocking constantly even while in their cot.

Size of the Head
When you send your baby for general check up, the doctor will measure the size of its head and look for autism signs. Infants that have head that grows abnormally faster than others during the first year of life and possesses other signs of autism, then you should ask your doctor to evaluate your child further for ASD.

Another thing to remember is that if one of the brother or sister of the child was diagnosed with autism, then it is more likely that the child is also autistic.
It is important to remember that no one sign or behavior means autism. Experts say that it is the combination of 2 or more signs or the presence of almost all the autism signs. Infants may display some of the signs and behavior but are not autistic at all. Signs Of Autism Infants

Signs Of Autism Infantsis a proven Autism Solution for your Child.TryAutism, Aspergers, ASD Program and change child’s life forever!”
Article Source

Autism Signs Baby – Signs That Your Baby Is Autistic

Autism Signs Baby

Several years ago, autism can only be recognized in children as early as 18 to 24 months of age. But today, after several studies and observations, we can now recognize the earlier signs of autism in babies. Signs include having an unusual eye contact, peculiarities of hearing, and social development and play.

The word “autism” is derived from the Greek word “autos” which means “self”, and it affects the way children view others in relation to themselves. This is why autistic children can be best described as “having their own world”. They want to play and be alone, do not want to be touched or hugged, and have problems interacting with others.

Autism is a pervasive disorder which affects multiple areas of functioning. ASD affects children differently – in their cognitive ability, in their IQ, in developing communications skills, in their relationship with others even with their own parents, and so many more.

Although there are still debates about the causes of autism, experts believe that the earlier autistic children receive treatment, the better the outcome is likely to be. Early intervention makes a huge difference in the battle against autism in babies. Signs of autism must be carefully observed and seek immediate help if you spot them in your child. Instead of playing the wait-and-see game, parents must be vigilant in observing the development of their child. This will greatly contribute in enhancing the quality of life of children. Autism Signs Baby

Researchers and experts are now claiming that they can recognize autism as young as 6 months old or even earlier in some cases. The good thing about this is that new and earlier treatment for autism can then be developed and it can make a huge difference in the child’s future.

Here are the red flags of autism in babies – signs that your baby is autistic:

Eye Contact – Having an unusual gaze or in making an eye contact is a very common sing of autism in babies. Signs of disinterest with other people and the environment can also be observed.

Hearing – Autistic babies respond less when called upon compared to normal developing babies. They are also not affected by any audible changes in the surroundings. Hence, most autistic babies are initially suspected of being deaf.

Social Development and Play – Autistic babies may show lack of interest in the types of play that other infants enjoy, even those which involve social interaction with the parents.

Because these early signs can vary in severity and symptoms, they may go unrecognized. Therefore, parents must be careful in observing the behavior of autism in babies. Signs of autism can also be a sign of other disorders.

Also, according to one research, a child who has an older brother or sister diagnosed with autism is more likely to be autistic as well. Parents may notice that their child’s physical development is different from others. Having a larger than the normal head circumference is said to be an indication of autism in babies. Signs of having unusual facial expressions and gestures can also be noted. Autism Signs Baby


About the Author:
Autism Signs Baby is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.
Try Autism, Aspergers, ASD Program and change child’s life forever!”
Article Source