Tag Archives: First Signs

Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Sandy asks…

rett syndrome-please help!?

Hi all> I asked this question before but didnt get any responses

Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I never had it but wanted to help. This is what my research came up with,
Stage I, called early onset, generally begins between 6 and 18 months of age. Quite frequently, this stage is overlooked because symptoms of the disorder may be somewhat vague, and parents and doctors may not notice the subtle slowing of development at first. The infant may begin to show less eye contact and have reduced interest in toys. There may be delays in gross motor skills such as sitting or crawling. Hand-wringing and decreasing head growth may occur, but not enough to draw attention. This stage usually lasts for a few months but can persist for more than a year.

Stage II, or the rapid destructive stage, usually begins between ages 1 and 4 and may last for weeks or months. This stage may have either a rapid or a gradual onset as purposeful hand skills and spoken language are lost. The characteristic hand movements begin to emerge during this stage and often include wringing, washing, clapping, or tapping, as well as repeatedly moving the hands to the mouth. Hands are sometimes clasped behind the back or held at the sides, with random touching, grasping, and releasing. The movements persist while the child is awake but disappear during sleep. Breathing irregularities such as episodes of apnea and hyperventilation may occur, although breathing is usually normal during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss of social interaction and communication. General irritability and sleep irregularities may be seen. Gait patterns are unsteady and initiating motor movements can be difficult. Slowing of head growth is usually noticed during this stage.

Stage III, also called the plateau or pseudo-stationary stage, usually begins between ages 2 and 10 and can last for years. Apraxia, motor problems, and seizures are prominent during this stage. However, there may be improvement in behavior, with less irritability, crying, and autistic-like features. An individual in stage III may show more interest in her surroundings, and her alertness, attention span, and communication skills may improve. Many girls remain in this stage for most of their lives.

The last stage, stage IV — called the late motor deterioration stage — can last for years or decades and is characterized by reduced mobility. Muscle weakness, rigidity (stiffness), spasticity, dystonia (increased muscle tone with abnormal posturing of extremity or trunk), and scoliosis (curvature of the spine) are other prominent features. Girls who were previously able to walk may stop walking. Generally, there is no decline in cognition, communication, or hand skills in stage IV. Repetitive hand movements may decrease, and eye gaze usually improves.

Hope it helps.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Thomas asks…

rett syndrome – pleaes help!!!!!!!!?

Hi all> I asked this question yesterdaybut got very few responses – Most that did respond gave me generic websites with a laundry list of symtopms that I am already aware of
I AM LOOKING FOR PERSONAL ACCOUNTS PLEASE
Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight
PLEASE DONT COPY & PASTE INFO FOUND ON RETT SYNDROME SIGHTS!!! IF THAT WERE WHAT I WERE LOOKING FOR I COULD DO IT MYSELF!

admin answers:

I’m sorry that you haven’t found much help here- why not find an internet forum for Rett Syndrome? I’m sure you’d get a lot more informative answers. Perhaps join CafeMom and find a Rett Syndrome group. Or poll some people on the IRSF website?

You’re at a generic internet forum at the moment, it might be tough to come across people who have experienced a very specific illness. Try going to a more specific internet forum for more information.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Mark asks…

rett syndrome?

Hi all>
Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I worked with a child that had RS and her parents told me she was originally diagnosed with CP. It was very difficult to tell the difference between the two.So it was drawn out. The little girl was 2 1/2 before she was properly diagnosed. One main difference between CP & RS is that with CP when you learn something you keep the knowelege and remember things, with RS you can learn it and loose it. This little girl I worked with could not walk or talk but she could feed herself with her hands and crawl a little. By the time she turned 5 she had lost everthing she had gained. She could no longer swallow her food feed herself or crawl. Her Dr had to put a G button in to do tubal feedings and then she was put in a kid cart because she couldnt get around on her own. I hope I helped but this is the only knowlege I have of RS….

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Linda asks…

rett syndrome?

Hi all>
Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I have only dealt with a child that was in Stage III. I was a special education worker in a middle school a few years ago. We had one case of Rett in our school. I worked with the child very closely for a year and then was reassigned to other duties. I stilled worked with her, but a much small amount for the other 3 years she was with us. I don’t know how much I can help. However, if you have some specific questions you can contact me and I would try to help.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Pictures

Mary asks…

rett syndrome?

Hi all>
Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

First signs were within the first couple of months of birth. She never cried or fussed to be held or for any attention at all. She stared and giggled at for hours at a picture, a fan, a blank spot on the wall. She was floppy…we noticed this at about 3-4 months. She has a twin that is normal, so we noticed all of these differences right away. She never hugged or held anyone tight, or cared who was holding her.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Linda asks…

What are signs that a child has Autism?

admin answers:

I tend to worry about checklists, because they’re often taken out of context…ie “My child flaps his hands when he’s really excited, could it be autism?” Lots of kids, and adults flap when excited. Ever watch Wheel of Fortune?

A really good website if you’re concerned is First Signs http://www.firstsigns.org/index.html

EDITED TO ADD: Another good website, with examples of what the diagnostic criteria means.. This website is great for those that don’t know much about autism. Http://www.bbbautism.com/diagnostics_psychobabble.htm

To be diagnosed with autism, a child should have a total of six (or more) items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1), and one each from (2) and (3):

(1) qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
(a) marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors, such as eye-to- eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
(b) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
(c) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
(d) lack of social or emotional reciprocity

(2) qualitative impairments in communication, as manifested by at least one of the following:
(a) delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
(b) in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
(c) stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
(d) lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level

(3) restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities as manifested by at least one of the following:
(a) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
(b) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
(c) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting or complex whole-body movements)
(d) persistent precoccupation with parts of objects

AND:
B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years: (1) social interaction, (2) language as used in social communication, or (3) symbolic or imaginative play.

In a child age 16-30 months, the MCHAT is an excellent screening tool to see if you should evaluate for autism. Http://messageboards.ivillage.com/n/mb/message.asp?webtag=iv-ppautism&msg=20700.1&ctx=0

Edited to add: I have an issue with autism being diagnosed where the criteria is being disregarded. Are you using autism and pdd-nos interchangeably? If so, then I can see how it could happen. Beetlemilk, because your son’s don’t meet the criteria for autism, they’ve been diagnosed with pdd-nos. PDD-NOS is a diagnosis by exclusion. If a child presents with some symptoms from (1), (2), and/or (3), and their pattern of symptoms is not better described by one of the other PDD diagnoses (i.e., Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Rett’s Disorder, or Childhood Disintegrative disorder) then a professional might decide that a diagnoses of PDD-NOS is warranted.

When comparing PDD-NOS to Autism, PDD-NOS is used when a child has symptoms of autism, but not in the configuration needed for an autism diagnosis. Social component is where the most impairment is seen. Children who fail to meet criteria for autism and don’t have adequate social impairment typically have a developmental disability, and their symptoms can by accounted for by that.

Regarding the childbrain quiz, my daughter now scores around 118, and that was using the grading guide before answering each question. Without using that guide, I did score it closer to 132. Still in the moderate range, and it’s an accurate reflection. When she was younger, she did score higher. I’ve seen that to be a very good screening tool as well. One caution though, children with speech delays could fall under “mild pdd” when it’s not present. That’s why it’s important to follow up with a reputable diagnostician.

Within the autism diagnostic criteria, My daughter has the following profile From section 1 A is fairly mild, B severe, C is fairly resolved, D is mild
From section 2 A mild since language is comming in, B Severe, C moderate, D moderate
From section 3 A & B moderate…working very hard to resolve these, but her obsessive tendancies are pretty tough to crack. C & D are not issues at all, nor have they ever been issues.

Within the criteria for an autism diagnosis, her spectrum is mild to severe, depending on symptom. She’s also very high functioning (which relates more to self help skills, and IQ) I would say honestly she’s mild/moderate autistic

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Importance of Early Detection of Autism Signs

Autism signs manifest themselves by the ages of two and three. A significant degree of awkwardness in certain developmental stages is the first signs that a child may be suffering from a developmental disorder within the autism spectrum. The child may seem not affectionate, antisocial, stubborn, and obsessive-compulsive. Usually the child suffering from autism sees the world in a different way. This disorder, like others, affects brain growth and development. It affects it from the time of birth and onwards. There is no cure for this disorder, in fact some people see it as more a difference than a disease of any sort. There are, of course treatment and therapy options that will allow the child to build the necessary skills for coping with the life they will be facing.

Signs of autism include the inability to effectively communicate with other people. This includes parents, teachers and peers. The reason being is that a child with symptoms of autism does not react or understand otherwise intuitive cues from environmental, emotional, and social stimuli. These children see the world in black and white. They are very literal in their understanding of things. Unfortunately, with all of the nuances and gray areas of communication and feeling this will often lead to misunderstandings and confusion. Overstress such as these can cause an autistic child to seem irritable, willful, and stubborn. They may throw tantrums and otherwise act unmanageable. This simply stems from their fear and confusion over something. Thus, this factor and their need to have a stable routine that is unhindered with change.

High functioning autistic experience the same symptoms but to a lesser degree. These individuals can pretty much live their lives as normally as possible with only the need and guidance from outside sources in some cases. Individuals with high functioning autism often only seem a little different and can fit in well amongst the crowds. The more severe the symptoms of autism, the harder it will be for a child or even an adult to live a normal life. This is why detecting signs of autism early is so important. The sooner we know about a child’s problem the sooner we can begin helping them to cope and live with it.

Treatment is available for people with autism and other disorders in that spectrum. There is not a cure, but therapy and special education classes can help a child learn skills and coping methods to handle his/her disorder throughout life. Acceptance of a child’s difference, patience and understanding with his difficulties, and an open mind at his/her view on life is essential for helping these children feel comfortable with the world around them. Feeling safe and comfortable with who they are and confident in how they can interact with other people is one of the most important aspects of dealing with these developmental disorders. And because autism signs present themselves early, it means that someone with this disorder will have quite a long time to develop these skills. Living with autism is difficult for everyone involved, but it is manageable.

For the latest videos and training information on child development as well as books and curricula on Autism please visit childdevelopmentmedia.com.

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Autism and Asperger Syndrome-similarities and Differences

The Asperger syndrome affects children and adults patients by modifying their communication skills and making them unable to interact with the persons around them. The autistic disorder in most cases associates the lack of communication skills with learning disabilities.

The Asperger syndrome is an autistic disorder related to autism but with less symptoms or less serious modifications. The pure autism is rare, about one case in 5000 children and it occurs four times more often in male children than in girls. Autistic spectrum disorders are all conditions implying symptoms related to the manifestations of autism.

The exact cause of autism cases is still unknown to scientists but researchers have detected a possible link between the condition and a genetic factor without any actual pattern of inheritance. Autistic modifications are blamed on brain damages and abnormal development before birth, during childbirth or after birth.

The first signs of an autistic disorder appear soon after birth in severe cases but usually between the age of 3-4 when parents observe abnormal modifications in the child’s behavior. There are three main symptom groups involved in autism and patients with the Asperger syndrome have only some of these signs, unlike the children with actual autism who suffer from disorders from all of the three symptoms groups.

The main difficulty of children with autistic disorders is to interact with the persons around the. They hardly ever make and sustain an eye-contact, resist cuddling, reject any form of affection and never look for it, cannot stand being kissed, have difficulties in making friends and are mostly unable to play with children their age. Autistic patients are not able to understand emotions coming from other persons and have problems with obeying simple rules; this leads them to the incapacity of frequenting a regular school.

Patients show an obsessive interests for repetitive actions and might look at an object fro an increased period of time. They have no imagination and are not interested in imaginative play. The games are almost the same every day and usually match with playing methods used by younger children. The ability to communicate with others is disturbed, cannot keep a conversation and cannot use words in meaningful sentences.

Regular actions like walking, sitting up or down will be later acknowledged and assimilated than normally. All patients with autistic disorders tend to be clumsy and struggle the games lessons at school. Older patients develop obsessive interests for exact timetables and resist changes in their environment. They rapidly become agitated and angered if their routine is modified. Autistic children are extremely sensitive noise and light and might show severe responses.

For greater resources on Autism or especially about autism symptoms please click this link http://www.autism-info-center.com/autism-symptoms.htm

For greater resources on Autism or especially about autism symptoms please click this link http://www.autism-info-center.com/autism-symptoms.htm
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Tests For Autism – Methods Doctors Use To Diagnose Autism

Tests For Autism

Parents sometimes find themselves seeking more than one opinion when the doctor diagnoses your child with autism. Autism is extremely different in every child. Autism is an obscure disorder to diagnose. However, there are some specific ways in which doctors can efficiently identify autism in children. If your child shows any one of the signs of autism, you should not hesitate to contact your pediatrician in order to quell your concerns.

Autism definitely occurs at a young age, rather than being a disorder an older child might develop. It is usually is detected before the age of three, and quite frequently, much earlier. Delays in speech and communication are some of the first signs that a parent should seek an appointment with a specialist. Although your regular pediatrician will be able to spot unusual behavior, you’ll want your child to be examined by a professional who specializes in autism and other cared for. Tests For Autism

You should be aware that pediatricians will most likely order a hearing test as the next step for diagnosing autism. Inadequate auditory functions could possibly be apparent, due to the disorder. There are two types of auditory tests – first, a test is administered which records the tones a child can hear, and the other test requires sedation and measures the brain response to certain tones. The first method of testing is preferred because it does not require the use of a sedative. Your doctor may suggest testing your child for a syndrome called Fragile X, after auditory testing, which often times goes hand in hand with the diagnoses of autism. Physicians also have been noted to test the metabolism of your child, as an evaluation. A blood or urine sample must be given to properly analyze DNA.

Another autism diagnoses method that specialists use is done by requesting a MRI or CAT scan. This method can also be helpful in the diagnosing procedures. The important thing is to seek consultation with doctors you trust. It is prudent to request as many additional opinions as necessary so that you will more confident going into the treatment affecting your child. After your child has been diagnosed, be consistent with one doctor so that treatment is uniform so that you and your child will be familiar with the same physician. This will make them feel comfortable and will also aid in their ability to trust the physician. Autism is difficult to diagnose and even more difficult to treat, so remember that you should begin to learn as much as possible about the disorder as soon as your doctor confirms the diagnoses. If you have yet to speak with your doctor about abnormal behavior in your child, do so immediately. By detecting autism as early as possible, you give your child the best possible opportunity to become a high-functioning individual with many more opportunities to adequately function in this life. Tests For Autism

Tests For Autismis a proven Autism Solution for your Child.TryAutism, Aspergers, ASD Program and change child’s life forever!”
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