Tag Archives: Eye Contact

Question?: Autism Signs In 3 Year Olds

James asks…

Does this sound like Autism in my 3 year old?

We waiting to go to the Children Hospital.For another opinion. But this is my DD actions everyday…
_rocks and spins toys.
_ Like to play by herself.(not with siblings or kids in school)
_no eye contacts.
_don’t like being touch.
_have no speech what so ever.

admin answers:

The speech delay may be an issue, but mainly you need to check if she is making an effort to communicate with others.

Rocking, spinning, playing by themselves, not making eye contact, and not liking to be touched are NOT signs of autism.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

William asks…

What are the symptoms of autism in children under two?

admin answers:

Appears indifferent to surroundings
Appears content to be alone, happier to play alone
Displays lack of interest in toys
Displays lack of response to others
Does not point out objects of interest to others (called protodeclarative pointing)
Marked reduction or increase in activity level
Resists cuddling

Young children with autism usually have impaired language development. They often have difficulty expressing needs (i.e., use gestures instead of words) and may laugh, cry, or show distress for unknown reasons. Some autistic patients develop rudimentary language skills that do not serve as an effective form of communication. They may develop abnormal patterns of speech that lack intonation and expression and may repeat words or phrases repetitively (called echolalia). Some children with autism learn to read.

Autistic children do not express interest in other people and often prefer to be alone. They may resist changes in their routine, repeat actions (e.g., turn in circles, flap their arms) over and over, and engage in self-injurious behavior (e.g., bite or scratch themselves, bang their head).

Other symptoms in young children include:
Avoids cuddling or touching
Frequent behavioral outbursts, tantrums
Inappropriate attachments to objects
Maintains little or no eye contact
Over- or undersensitivity to pain, no fear of danger
Sustained abnormal play
Uneven motor skills
Unresponsiveness to normal teaching methods and verbal clues (may appear to be deaf despite normal hearing)

Research has shown that autism occurs more often in first born children and males. My daughter (first born) was an incredibly easy, cuddly baby, but definitely displayed language/communication delays. Her diagnosis is Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Sandy asks…

rett syndrome-please help!?

Hi all> I asked this question before but didnt get any responses

Im doing some research on the genetic disorder Rett Syndrome (RS) & I am looking for some first hand accounts of the early stages
Ive frequented IRSF & MANY other rett syndrome pages but I am really looking for some information from people who have dealt with it on a hands on basis>
My biggest area of interest/curiosity is about the first “signs”

what were your first clues that something wasnt right
was it drawn out or did it just seem to happen overnight

admin answers:

I never had it but wanted to help. This is what my research came up with,
Stage I, called early onset, generally begins between 6 and 18 months of age. Quite frequently, this stage is overlooked because symptoms of the disorder may be somewhat vague, and parents and doctors may not notice the subtle slowing of development at first. The infant may begin to show less eye contact and have reduced interest in toys. There may be delays in gross motor skills such as sitting or crawling. Hand-wringing and decreasing head growth may occur, but not enough to draw attention. This stage usually lasts for a few months but can persist for more than a year.

Stage II, or the rapid destructive stage, usually begins between ages 1 and 4 and may last for weeks or months. This stage may have either a rapid or a gradual onset as purposeful hand skills and spoken language are lost. The characteristic hand movements begin to emerge during this stage and often include wringing, washing, clapping, or tapping, as well as repeatedly moving the hands to the mouth. Hands are sometimes clasped behind the back or held at the sides, with random touching, grasping, and releasing. The movements persist while the child is awake but disappear during sleep. Breathing irregularities such as episodes of apnea and hyperventilation may occur, although breathing is usually normal during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss of social interaction and communication. General irritability and sleep irregularities may be seen. Gait patterns are unsteady and initiating motor movements can be difficult. Slowing of head growth is usually noticed during this stage.

Stage III, also called the plateau or pseudo-stationary stage, usually begins between ages 2 and 10 and can last for years. Apraxia, motor problems, and seizures are prominent during this stage. However, there may be improvement in behavior, with less irritability, crying, and autistic-like features. An individual in stage III may show more interest in her surroundings, and her alertness, attention span, and communication skills may improve. Many girls remain in this stage for most of their lives.

The last stage, stage IV — called the late motor deterioration stage — can last for years or decades and is characterized by reduced mobility. Muscle weakness, rigidity (stiffness), spasticity, dystonia (increased muscle tone with abnormal posturing of extremity or trunk), and scoliosis (curvature of the spine) are other prominent features. Girls who were previously able to walk may stop walking. Generally, there is no decline in cognition, communication, or hand skills in stage IV. Repetitive hand movements may decrease, and eye gaze usually improves.

Hope it helps.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Medication

William asks…

Is it possible to stop being autistic?

I still can’t talk, but that isn’t because of autism. I have better eye contact now. I can understand people’s emotions. I don’t have obsessions any more. My anger problems are getting better. I am starting to participate in groups more. I still have anger issues. That is my only problem.
Yes. I am certain I have autism. I have been tested a few times.

admin answers:

You can only go so far. That’s like asking if you are medically depressed (have all the brain malfunctions to cause depression) can I just fix myself to not be depressed and have my brain work with medication and treatment you can come a little ways. But it’s just how you are born. So my answer is yes but not really.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thomas asks…

How do you know if a child has mild autism ?

My friend has a 5 yr old son who can say a few words then cuts of into bable. She doesn’t talk “baby talk” to him. When she wants to get his attention he avoids eye contact by rolling his eyes in every direction. When we took him to the fair certain noise would bother him and he would cover his ears. The noise didn’t even have to be high pitched or very loud. When she asked the doctor about his speech, he simply said it was a speech impediment that once he starts school he will get help for it. I’m not sure how to approach her about it either.

admin answers:

DON’T WAIT UNTIL HE STARTS SCHOOL!

Early intervention is key in cases of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Nonverbal Learning Disorder, and delayed speech.

Please ask her to take the following steps immediately:

Find a pediatrician that specializes in children with developmental disabilities.

Contact the school system for a complete evaluation (this is free, and could have been before the child trained 3!).

The school system will choose a team of professionals to evaluate the child, including, but not limited to a speech therapist, an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, a school adjustment counselor, a school psychologist, a teacher and an expert in special education. His parents will be part of the team, and they may bring any experts they so choose to the team meetings.

The child’s new pediatrician will submit a recommendation for the services the child needs. The child may require an independent evaluation by additional specialists (pediatric neurologist, etc. To develop a treatment plan.

Make sure that the team adopts the recommendations of his pediatrician and specialists in their entirety; appeal the team’s decision, if necessary.

The team will develop an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies the services to be provided and the frequency of the provision, as well as the modifications that will be made to “regular” education to accommodate him.

His parents have the right to accept or reject the IEP, in whole or in part, and appeal same, in whole or in part. If they choose to appeal and another, independent evaluation is required, the school must pay for the evaluation.

The school system is required BY LAW to provide early intervention services beginning at age 3, so he will probably begin in a special program, immediately.

This is a very complex subject not easily dealt with in this forum, however the above is a start. DON’T WAIT!

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Question?: Autistic Definition

Ken asks…

What is a brief description of autism?

Tomorrow I am going to an organization to help kids with autism do things that they can’t do on their own. I have never done this before, and I don’t know anyone with autism. I don’t understand how the children there will behave, or how they act. I tried looking it up, but the definitions are way to long and confusing. Please don’t be rude to people with autism when answering!

admin answers:

Autism is a neurological developmental disorder. Symptoms include difficulty socializing and communicating, lack of eye contact, delayed speech, difficulty reading people, obsessive interests, need for routine, repetitive behavior, poor motor coordination, and abnormal sensory processing.

The symptoms of autism range from severe to mild. There is a lot of diversity among people with autism. There’s not just one way an autistic person will behave or act; they are all different. The children you’ll work with may become agitated by sudden changes. Some won’t be receptive to you at first, since you’re new. They may have repetitive behaviors like hand-flapping or rocking back and forth. They might go on monologues about topics of interests, or they might talk very little. Some will react negatively or even have a meltdown over certain sounds, foods, or touch. But like I said, all autistic people are different, so don’t expect every child there to act the same.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Jenny asks…

3 month old Autism advice?

Hello,

My 3 month old daughter is unfortunately showing the signs of Autism. Our Pedi is asking us to wait 2 more weeks to see if she starts to make better eye contact and starts to smile but in my gut, sadly, I feel like this will be the diagnosis. We have already called a specialist who wont be able to see us until August.

My question to the group, is there any advice in terms of treatment or exercises I can do with the baby to help her along? I feel helpless and want to do anything I can to help my little girl.

Thank you in advance for your replies
I truly appreciate the posts so far. 2 follow ups 1. We had her eyes checked last week and she passed with flying colors. 2. According to several websites early signs of Autism can be detected in 3 months http://www.parents.com/baby/health/autism/autism-month-by-month-guide/

Thank you all again!

admin answers:

I am by no means totally educated on the fact, but I am fairly certain that autism is not something that is diagnosed in infants. It becomes apparent in toddler hood and a lengthy observation period follows before a true diagnosis of autism. If your baby is unresponsive to stimuli and not smiling, there could be literally hundreds of other reasons. Your baby is only 3 months old, I would not stress out until you know a bit more information. But please try and relax in the knowledge that autism is not apparent in a 3 month old baby.

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Question?: What Is Autism

Joseph asks…

How does autism affect the development of a three year old boy ?

im doing a childcare project on a child with autism .
i was wondering if anyone can tell me how it could be affecting his mental development

i haven’t found much useful Information on the net .

if you know of any websites that might help i would appreciate it

THANKS!

admin answers:

My twins are autistic and from a very early age they showed developmental delay however we at first put it down to them being born early as this can sometimes stunt development. They were over a year old before they could sit up by themselves and over 2 before they could walk. They are 5 now and still have limited language, this is due to them being locked away in their own little world, where any change or taking them out of schedule can cause severe confusion and upset, I give you an example today we went into the town and they presumed we were going round the shops as we normally would but as soon as we walked past the centre they realised this wasn’t their routine and dropped their legs and refused to walk. They say the confusion caused by autism is equal to you standing in a crowded room full of loudly shouting people and asked to concentrate on writing on a wall that would cause anyone to be uncomfortable let alone a child. Autistic children generally avoid eye contact usually the reason for speech delay. They can also resort to aggressive behaviour as my twins do they spent 2 years of their life banging their heads off hard surfaces -its very scary if you try to restrain them they don’t understand why and do it harder. They don’t do it as often now as they can understand me a bit better and visa versa but if they become uncomfortable they can still kick off and more often than not any object within their vicinity will get launched. When the boys were three they had no clear language (due to lack of eye contact) this caused frustration because if they wanted something they couldn’t tell me and id have to spend the next 30 mins trying to stop them headbanging and trying different things like drinks snacks changing the tv channel etc quite often they would forget why they kicked off in the first place but couldn’t calm themselves down because they were so wound up. Autistic children due to being shut in their own world generally are solitary and do not like their play to be interrupted, my oldest twin will hide under his bed with his trains and line them up in an exact straight line if any of them were to be moved all hell will break lose. He loves order and its through this tendency that we have been able to bring on his development, we use symbols with him so he knows exactly what is going to happen throughout the day and most of the time we stick to it and he knows whats coming next, he generally knows by where we are- what we are then going to be doing its only on rare occasions like this morning when we had to go somewhere unexpected that his perfect balance of routine is disrupted, one of the main important things for autistic children is routine and keeping language very simple making it easier for them to understand the world around them and also not pushing them to do things just because other kids their age are doing them. My twins are 5 and still in nappies they do not understand toiletry needs and often people say to me ( much to my annoyance) are they not out of nappies yet. But they have no idea that if i asked them to sit on the toilet or potty with their trousers down id end up with a 3 hour screaming match on my hands they will get there it might not be this year or next but when they understand it will come. A year ago they couldn’t even ask me for a drink now they know to come and ask me using the word drink i will then say go and get one and they help themselves i never thought id be able to leave my fridge unlocked as the would just be helping themselves left right and centre but the are slowly and surely learning acceptable behaviour. One thing i noticed with my twins from as early as a year they wont try anything new until they are 100% sure about it, pushing them to do new things just causes confusion and upset, with autistic children it will come when it comes

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Question?: Autism Signs In Adults

Mark asks…

What are the signs of a autistic (spelling is probably wrong sorry.) child?

What are some signs that your child might be autistic? Is there any clear signs or is only something a doctor can see?

admin answers:

I work with children and adults that have autism. Here are some signs that you should look for. If you take your child to a specialist they will look for the same thing. These are based off the guidelines of the DSM

. Does your child enjoy being swung, bounced on your knee, etc.?
____ 2. Does your child take an interest in other children?
____ 3. Does your child like climbing on things, such as up/on chairs?
____ 4. Does your child enjoy playing peek-a-boo / hide & seek?
____ *5. Pretend Play (PP): Does your child ever pretend, for example, to make a cup of tea using a toy cup and teapot, or pretend other things (pouring juice)?
____ 6. Does your child ever use his or her index finger to point, to ask for something?
____ *7. Protodeclarative Pointing (PDP): Does your child ever use his or her index finger to point, to indicate interest in something?
____ 8. Can your child play properly with small toys (e.g. Cars or blocks) without just mouthing, fiddling, or dropping them?
____ 9. Does your child ever bring objects over to you (parent), to show you something?

When you take your child to get checked out, at the appointment they will look specifically for these things:

Eye Contact: During the appointment, has the child made eye contact with you?
____ *ii. Gaze monitoring (GM): Get the child’s attention, then point across the room at an interesting object and say, “Oh Look! There’s a (name of a toy)!” Watch the child’s face. Does the child look across to see what you are pointing at? (To record a YES, make sure the child does not just look at your hand, but at the object you are pointing at).
____ *iii. Pretend Play (PP): Get the child’s attention, then give the child a miniature toy cup and teapot and say, “Can you make a cup of tea?” Does the child pretend to pour out tea and drink it? (If you can elicit an example of pretending in some other game, score a YES on this item).
____ *iv. Protodeclarative Pointing (PDP): Say to the child, “Where’s the light?” or “Show me the light.” Does the child point with their index finger at the light? (Repeat this with, “Where’s the bear?” or some other unreachable object if the child does not understand the word light. To record a YES on this item, the child must have looked up at your face around the time of pointing).
____ v. Block Tower: Can the child build a tower of blocks? (If so how many?)

Everyone with autism is different so your child may not display the “typical symtons of autism”. This is why is it important to not only observe your child in its environment, but also set up situations and take note on how ur child responds or doesnt respond to the problem.
I really hope this helps. Autism can be a great thing as long as you know what tools work best for your child.

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Question?: Autism Signs In 3 Year Olds

Jenny asks…

Do you think I lost my outgoing nature from autism?

I think I might have autism. Every since my 13th birthday, I lost my outgoing glow around my relatives. I’m now gloomy and shy around them and I get nervous if I made eye contact with them, I only make eye contact to people I know really good.
I’ve actually had social problems since I was 11.

admin answers:

No, absolutely not. Autism is something people are born with or develop at a very young age- it shows up when a kid is between 1-3 or 4 years old usually? If you weren’t showing signs of it before you were 13, you don’t have it.

This sounds more like normal phase/stage of shyness or maybe anxiety disorder of some kind. Are you nervous around other people besides particular relatives or do you worry about social situations or crowds or thngs like that? If you start avoiding people because of it or are just feeling nervous a lot talk to your parents or your doctor.

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