Tag Archives: Eye Contact

Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

Mandy asks…

How can you tell if a young man has schizophrenia?

Just wondering – The same young man has depression and AD-HD. He takes special classes.

As he is talking, he’ll look in another direction, as if he is looking at something past you. He stays focus on it and doesn’t make eye contact.
Also, on one occasion I walked in on him talking to him self, facing a wall.
What are some signs of schizophrenia?

admin answers:

It kinda sounds like it could be autism too check out this sight:
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

http://health.yahoo.com/mentalhealth-symptoms/schizophrenia-symptoms/healthwise–aa46973.html

this page has a list of the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia

Symptoms of schizophrenia usually emerge during adolescence or early adulthood and may appear suddenly or develop gradually. When symptoms develop gradually, they may be misdiagnosed with other conditions with similar symptoms, such as bipolar disorder or substance abuse (which commonly occurs with schizophrenia).

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Lisa asks…

what is Rett’s syndrome?

admin answers:

What is Rett syndrome?
Rett syndrome is a unique developmental disorder that is first recognized in infancy and seen almost always in girls, but can be rarely seen in boys. It is caused by mutations on the X chromosome on a gene called MECP2. There are more than 200 different mutations found on the MECP2 gene. Most of these mutations are found in eight different “hot spots.” It strikes all racial and ethnic groups, and occurs worldwide in 1 of every 10,000 to 23,000 female births.

Rett syndrome is a developmental disorder. It is not a degenerative disorder. It causes problems in brain function that are responsible for cognitive, sensory, emotional, motor and autonomic function. These can include learning, speech, sensory sensations, mood, movement, breathing, cardiac function, and even chewing, swallowing, and digestion.

Rett syndrome symptoms appear after an early period of apparently normal or near normal development until six to eighteen months of life, when there is a slowing down or stagnation of skills. A period of regression then follows when she loses communication skills and purposeful use of her hands. Soon, stereotyped hand movements such as handwashing, gait disturbances, and slowing of the normal rate of head growth become apparent. Other problems may include seizures and disorganized breathing patterns while she is awake. In the early years, there may be a period of isolation or withdrawal when she is irritable and cries inconsolably. Over time, motor problems may increase, but in general, irritability lessens and eye contact and communication improve.

Rett syndrome is confirmed with a simple blood test to identify the MECP2 mutation. However, since the MECP2 mutation is also seen in other disorders, the presence of the MECP2 mutation in itself is not enough for the diagnosis of Rett syndrome. Diagnosis requires either the presence of the mutation (a molecular diagnosis) or fulfillment of the diagnostic criteria (a clinical diagnosis, based on signs and symptoms that you can observe) or both.

Rett syndrome can present with a wide range of disability ranging from mild to severe. The course and severity of Rett syndrome is determined by the location, type and severity of her mutation and X-inactivation. Therefore, two girls of the same age with the same mutation can appear quite different.

Rett syndrome presents many challenges, but with love, therapy and assistance, those with the syndrome can benefit from school and community activities well into middle age and beyond. They experience a full range of emotions and show their engaging personalities as they take part in social, educational, and recreational activities at home and in the community.
Http://www.rettsyndrome.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=16&Itemid=1000

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Infants

George asks…

What are the symptoms of a child with autism?

how do you know your child is autistic?

admin answers:

If your baby otherwise seems to be growing and developing normally, then that is probably not a sign of autism. Among other normal developmental milestones that you would expect at this age include that your baby smiles, is usually comforted or soothed when she is picked up, follows objects past the midline of her face, make ‘ooo’ and ‘aah’ type cooing noises, and maybe has begun laughing. You should definitely discuss it with your Pediatrician if you don’t think your baby’s behavior is normal though.

The symptoms you describe could also be seen in infants with high muscle tone, especially if her muscles usually seem extra stiff. This is something that you should also discuss with your Pediatrician, but it isn’t really related to autism at all.

Among the early signs and symptoms that parents and Pediatricians look for to alert them that a child needs further evaluation for autism include:

* not smiling by six months of age
* not babbling, pointing or using other gestures by 12 months
* not using single words by age 16 months
* not using two word phrases by 24 months
* having a regression in development, with any loss of language or social skills

Infants with autism might also avoid eye contact, and as they get older, act as if they are unaware of when people come and go around them, as you can see in this autism screening quiz.

Keep in mind that autism usually isn’t diagnosed until about age 3, although some experts believe that some children begin to show subtle signs as early as six months of age.

There is also an autism study that showed that some children with autism had abnormal brain growth. Specifically, they had a smaller than average head size at birth (at the 25th percentile), but then had a period of rapid head growth during which their head size moved up to the 84th percentile by age 6-14 months. But rapid head growth is not a sign in all kids with autism.

In general, if you are concerned about your child’s development, especially if you think that they might have autism, you should talk to your Pediatrician and consider a more formal developmental evaluation.

And keep in mind that when a child arches her back a lot, it can be a sign of gastroesophageal reflux (Sandifer Syndrome), although you would usually expect other symptoms, like spitting up and being fussy.
Getting An Evaluation
One of the frustrating things that occurs when parents think something is wrong with their child’s development is that they may be told ‘not to worry’ or that they ‘should just wait.’ Experts think that it is better for parents to trust their instincts and get their child evaluated if they think that they aren’t developing normally. This guide from First Signs is a good resource for parents trying to share their concerns with their Pediatrician.

Your local early childhood development program may also be able to do an evaluation if you are concerned about your child’s development.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

James asks…

is it normal to get angry with yourself for experiencing ptsd symptoms ?

im 30, have bpd and ptsd, iam awaiting therapy, i have lived a very tough, traumatic life.

i suffer with bad anxiety and panic which causes me to isolate myself….i only venture out if i have to go someplace.

i suffer with distrust and paranoia about people because of alot of bullying and victimization in my life.

i deal with anger, rage and aggressive feelings relating to bottled up anger when i was bullied earlier in my life…..i used to have aggressive outbursts in public an humiliate and embarress myself…pick fights with people…like impulsively go into a rage.

ive improved greatly and dont have rage outbursts in public anymore, but i still have the feelings that i need to address with therapy.

however im still a nervous wreck with my panic and anxiety…can be very unconfident whilst outside…hyper vigillant…panicky…if i perceive any threat it can ignite a rage attack…so i have to work hard to be in control.

i struggle to make eye contact & feel very anxious most
times….if i perceive a threat say outside i start to panic and feel out of control..and i feel scared.

i never manage to appear confident even though that is what i try desperatly to do, i feel i fail miserably and everyone can see that im frightened etc.

if another male makes eye contact i can perceive it as a threat, then i look nervously away, but then feel enraged and angry because i feel ive allowed myself to be manipulated.

and if im outside i feel that everyone can see im afraid or scared and are laughing about it or getting off on it.

this is when i start to lose it and get angry with myself and other people, it triggers rage…because in someway i feel ive been humiliated.

i get flashbacks to assaults ive suffered, bullying ive suffered, where i was shown up and embarressed in public.
how can i not feel angry if i feel ive let myself down in public or others are perceiving i look scared or frightened etc ?

is it because i care too much about my image and what others think ?
im constantly wrestling with my past and feel i suffer with a ” their doing it to me ” victim type mentality which i feel triggers the rage.

admin answers:

Yes it is. I have suffered alot of abuse and abandonment in my life aswell and suffer from ptsd anxiety bi-polar and used to struggle with my past alot. My little sister was sick when she was a baby and as a result is deaf epileptic slightly autistic and had alot of other health problems and my mother could not handle this and became very depressed which resulted in her drinking taking drugs going in and out of psychiatric institutions and bringing home alot of different unstable and at times psychotic men whom raped and physically assaulted me for many years and just as i had started to deal with the many problems that i had due to this i lost my only two children to SIDS (cot death) with in 2 years of each other and i was only 16 yo at the time and was angry all of the time after that for a few years. Since then i have been seeing a psychiatrist and have done alot of hours in therapy at first i didn’t think it would do any good but now i am alot better and can handle most situations without fretting too much in fact this is the first time i have been comfortable talking with someone whom i am not extremely close to other than my psychiatrist about these problems ever so i suggest that you go to see a psychiatrist about these feelings and stay in therapy and no matter how bad you think things are going just stick with it because eventually you will get there

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Asperger Syndrome

Laura asks…

Can someone please explain to me what Asperger syndrome is?

I made a new friend and she told me that she had Asperger syndrome I read a little about it online but I still don’t fully understand it 🙁 can someone help me? Please no rude answers!

admin answers:

I have Asperger’s basically I find it hard to make friends (socialize) , I stick to a very fixed routine which I cannot break. People with Asperger’s often have 1 to 3 obsessions (like Astrology, Trains etc) with me it is the Weather & Animals. Not everyone with Asperger’s is the same. They are tend to clumsy and find it very hard/impossible to make eye-contact with someone. I am of average-intelligence like most Asperger’s suffers. They can be ultra-sensitive to sounds, smell or light. They often take things rather literally like “I feel like killing you” the person with Asperger’s may take this literally and get frightened, although I have learnt that is is just a figure of speech. We find is difficult to read other people’s facial expressions and body language. I could name more traits but I’m too tired. One more thing they often have excellent memories especially with date of births, childhood memories etc. I hope you and your friend have an excellent time together forever.
Take care. Good-bye.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

John asks…

How many people have children with Autism?

Any type of autism on the spectrum. This is for a project at school. Just tell me about your experiences with Autistic (or Asperger’s) Children

admin answers:

1 in 88 children have autism (1 in 54 boys) 3/4 of children with autism are boys, the fourth is a girl. “classic” or “full blown autism” can be directed by the age of 2, warning signs are lack of eye contact, little or no speech, and a lack of other communication skills.

Asperger’s syndrome is a “high functioning” form of autism- meaning it shares the same basis of lacking communication skills with classic autism, but symptoms are far more severe.

I am a teen with asperger’s syndrome, and my main symptoms are severe anxiety, not knowing what to say in a conversation, having obsessions or fixations on things like trains, air planes, & computers, and no eye contact (this is due to anxiety). Most kids with mild autism also have other learning disabilities, like ADHD.

There is also a thing a lot of autistic people do called “stimming” It means self stimulation. You might see autistic kids doing things like rocking back and forth (it’s soothing) and flapping their hands, (I do this when excited).

One important thing to know about autistic individuals often are very proud to have autism, even though it is viewed by others as a disability. THERE IS NO CURE. But certain therapies DO help, like physical therapy, talk therapy, and social skills help.

THIS SHOULD JUST ABOUT SUM UP YOUR PROJECT!

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Steven asks…

Worried! Autism reg flags in 21 month old.?

Hi. We have twins. 1 boy ,one girl(21 months) – they were slightly premature. We are very blessed as they are both beautiful. I know boys develope slower than girls(this is the answer I get from everyone, even our Pediatrician)and I know I cant help but compare, but my “red flag” sensor is gradually building with our son. The things that I worry about the most are:
He walks (started at 16 months) but is still clumsy – he doesnt walk on tiptoes though.
When I come home, my daughter runs over and hugs me shouting dada. My son looks up, will eventually come over, gives me a quick look then goes off again to play alone with some toy. BUT When I hold him or swing him up, or play horsey/rocket ship – he loves it and I will get a lot of eye contact/big laughs. When I put him down he holds his arms up to go again(so there is interaction)
Another problem is the regression of speech – he used to babble a lot and got to the mama dada stage and was saying A O E vowels etc but then stopped at about 17 months – he rarely says anything now except grunts, though I may get a dada out of him if I work hard.
A few times a sudden loudspeaker and the loud cellphone beep in my car has made him explode into screams.
He will spin the wheels of a toy car rather than playing with it like a car. If theres an alphabet button toy he will hit the same letter-button over an over again (interestingly- there was a truck toy with letter buttons all around it-he was pressing the J rpeatedly. I turned the toy around, but he turned it right back around to go for the J again. I dont see any rudementary “prentend games” with any toys. He does NOT stack/line up toys though.
He’s an extremely picky eater. He does the hand flapping and finger flicking, and sometimes curls 1 arm up a bit when he walks. He doesnt spin but I suspect this might be coming. He will sit with a toy/object and study it over and over like he’s a little engeneer/scientist.
He wont use the phone-as-a -phone or brush-like-a-brush like his sister

He’s not a sad child, infact his laugh lights up the whole house, and he will join in with us if we are all playing – but then he’ll wander off alone – then come back in 2 minutes, back and fourth.
As you can see- I’m all over the map with my worries.He actually started babbling first, then stopped, then started again a few weeks later many times in the first 14mths. But this time is much longer (4+ months).
I’m taking to the PED next week – and want to get an evaluation – but Im scared I’ll get the “too-soon-to-tell” speech.
I am more worried than my wife.

concerned parent
I hope im paranoid. Im going to get his hearing checked. Him squealing at the loud noise those times makes me think his hearing is fine. As we all know the internet can be a blessing and a curse. It has a lot of very good info, but also it can make you believe the worst. Twins are like winning the lottery – but if there were one tiny downside is that you see 2 babies develop at different levels. Its X2 fun – but can also make a sane person paranoid too. I will get to the Pedriatrician. Thnkyou for advice everyone.

admin answers:

Sorry, this is a bit long, but I wanted to provide as much info as I could, hopefully it will be helpful and won’t make it more confusing 😉
The main thing with autism is in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities. Autism affects each person on an individual basis, so the symptoms are unique to each individual, they can be in any combination and range anywhere from mild to severe. You can have 2 people with the excat same characteristics and they will act completely different from each other. There are also different forms of autism…. Autistic disorder (aka classic autism), asperger’s disorder (some refer to it as high functioning autism), and pdd-nos (pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified aka atypical autism). Each has it’s own criteria for a diagnosis and each form can also range anywhere from mild to severe . This will tell you about what criteria has to met to be diagnosed with the forms of autism: http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_PDD There are also related conditions of autism, which can have similiar symptoms and/or share some symptoms of autism or can co-exist with autism: http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_related When someone is evaluated for autism, various medical tests may be ordered to rule out or identify other possible causes of the symptoms because many of the behaviors associated with autism are shared by other disorders.To be diagnosed with autism, they would need to be evaluated by a psychologist; developmental pediatrician; pyschiatrist; or a neurologist. The evaluation they use would depend on who they see but regardless there is certain criteria that has to be met in order to be diagnosed with any form of autism. An accurate diagnosis should be based on observation of the individual’s communication, behavior, and developmental levels.
By what you have listed, I would be concerned, much of what you have stated I have seen in my son (he has autistic disorder, sensory integration disorder, expressive & receptive language disorder, delays in fine & oral motor skills, and oral aversion (sensory to food textures/flavors). It appears he may have a form of autism/and or sensory integration, many of the characteristics you are stating can be considered for both disorders. Your son may not have autistic disorder but rather a milder form such as asperger’s or pdd-nos or a related disorder that shares some of the same characteristis of autism. I would look into him being evaluated by a speech language pathologist since his speech has regressed and is a picky eater..they can help with any speech/language delays, any issues related to eating, and help in other areas if needed. I would also look into him being evaluated by a occupational therapist, they can can help him with any sensory issues and help in him in other areas as well if needed. This will tell of the charcteristics related to sensory disorders http://www.sensory-processing-disorder.com/sensory-processing-disorder-checklist.html
This will tell you of the characteristics of autism: http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_char
I think you’ll find that what you have listed can be found on these pages..if you check out the link above for criteria for diagnosis, along with the characteristics of autism page, I think you’ll know in your gut if he does or doesn’t. The reason why I state that is because not only did we see much of what you are stating in our son, but we began noticing things weren’t quite right around the age of 2, however we had no suspicion of autism, we thought he was just slow and would catch up. We seen a show about autism and the charcteristics of, and they were describing our son, we had only heard of autism at that time, we had no idea what autism really was and consisted of until we seen that show. That made us do research about it as you are now, I went to the links I have left here in regards to characteristics and criteria for diagnosis among other sources and after reading tons of info about autism, we just knew/felt he had it before we had him evaluated and I feel if you continue to do your research about it, you’ll know in your gut/heart if he does or does not, you can describe characteristics you see in your son to us, but you are the one who is experiencing them first hand. Our son was evaluated for 1 month and diagnosed with it 1 month after turning 3…had we known the characteristics of autism before seeing that show, we would have had him evaluated much sooner..and during his evaluation we actually realized he was showing some signs much earlier than the age of 2 however we had no clue. Even if you have any doubt, as the saying goes, better to be safe than sorry. If he is found to have a form of autism, it is not by any means the end of the world, it has been proven that the earlier they receive help the more likely they will live very normal lives. Many tend to excel in math, music, and art; and many have excellent memory skills. Many can pick up on skills with very little or no help at all. Many with asperger’s have higher than normal intelligence. Even though my son has difficulty in certain areas, my son has a superior memory and is very smart, I think it would really surprise you with what he does know for his age (he’s 5 now), and I find that I don’t think it would of been possible for him to have such a gift without his autism, a gift that I would never want to take away from him. I will admit that you’ll have good days and bad days, you’ll have your ups and downs, etc., but that is typical for any child.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Chris asks…

Does anyone know why Rett Syndrome girls start off “normal” & then regress?

Okay I’m aware of what Rett Syndrome is & how it works (for the most part anyway) but what has me confused the most is that most of these girls develope normally for about the first 6-18 minths & then start to regress/lose skills they’ve already learned (i.e. talking, walking, eye contact) . I know this is due to a mutation in the MEPc2 gene but why/how is it they can learn things & then lose them later on. I relize the gene is responsible for turning on/off certian protiens but what is making these girls funtion properly in the beginning then? another gene maybe?

admin answers:

To quote a passage from wikipedia:
“The recent studies demonstrating that neurological deficits resulting from loss of MeCP2 can be reversed upon restoration of gene function are quite exciting because they show that neurons that have suffered the consequences of loss of MeCP2 function are poised to regain functionality once MeCP2 is provided gradually and in the correct spatial distribution. This provides hope for restoring neuronal function in patients with RTT. However, the strategy in humans will require providing the critical factors that function downstream of MeCP2 because of the challenges in delivering the correct MeCP2 dosage only to neurons that lack it, given that the slightest perturbation in MeCP2 level is deleterious. Thus, therapeutic strategies necessitate the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying individual RTT phenotypes and picking out the candidates that can be therapeutically targeted. The next phase of research needs to assess how complete the recovery is. Clearly, lethality, level of activity, and hippocampal plasticity are rescued, but are the animals free of any other RTT symptoms such as social behavior deficits, anxiety, and cognitive impairments? Since postnatal rescue results in viability, it will be important to evaluate if even the subtler phenotypes of RTT and MECP2 disorders are rescued when protein function is restored postnatally. This is particularly important given emerging data about early neonatal experiences and their long-term effects on behavior in adults.”

What I get from that is that the nerves become damaged by the defective gene, resulting in a loss of abilities that have already been learned.

Sorry if you’ve already read this, but this is just about all I could find as far as the reason for the decline period.
Hope this helps!

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Treatment For Autism In Babies

Maria asks…

What are your views on the MMR vaccine and autism?

Do you have children that you have decided to vaccinate or not, how are they developing? Please be honest – there is an epidemic of autism in this country (one in 130 kids!!!!!!) why the sudden increase over the last few decades if not the vaccines???? I’m petrified! I refuse to sentence my baby to mental retardation just because a doctor tells me to! HELP!!!!

admin answers:

You’ll have to make your own choice about vaccination. As the father of a 9 year old son with Asperger syndrome, a borderline autism spectrum, my experience was that he was developing quite normally, in fact above normal until he got the vaccine which did have thimerosal , at age 1 1/2. From then on he showed significant deterioration in verbal and social skills including eye contact and interaction. Before the shot he was beginning to speak and and react to his mother, siblings and I. He has been seen by the top experts in the United States, coast to coast, as we’ve spared no expense to provide the best medical treatment for him. His mother and I have undergone gene testing and have been determined NOT to have genetic markers for autism. No history of it in either of our familes at all. When I read and hear from all these naysayers pontificating that there is no connection between thimerosal /mercury vaccines and autism, I have to grin because without actually experiencing the results first hand they are only convincing themselves about what they believe and certainly not the heartbroken parents or children who suffer from vaccine related autism. And no, not every single case of autism is the result of vaccinations, but for the kids who suffer from it, the naysayers are doing a grave disservice to them and the public at large. So do what you feel is right for you and your kids and don’t let me or people who have opposing views to mine convince you one way or the other. But for those of you saying Aspergers syndrome is a “fad” I submit this: Asperger syndrome is named after Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger who, in 1944, described children in his practice who lacked nonverbal communication skills, failed to demonstrate empathy with their peers, and were physically clumsy. Fifty years later, AS was standardized as a diagnosis, but questions about many aspects of AS remain. For example, there is lingering doubt about the distinction between AS and high-functioning autism (HFA);partly due to this, the prevalence of AS is not firmly established. The exact cause of AS is unknown, although research supports the likelihood of a genetic basis; brain imaging techniques have NOT identified a clear common pathology. This is fact not a “fad”.

I wish you and yours the best.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers