Tag Archives: Everyday Life

Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Laura asks…

3 year old daughter’s speech. Need other parents’ advice!?

A few days ago, I read a book titled, “The Einstein Syndrome: Bright Children Who Talk Late” by Thomas Sowell. The book is of course about children who don’t speak or speak very little until they are between 2-4 years old. It emphasizes that bright children also can begin to speak very early, but (focuses on those who do not.)

My daughter is nearly 3. She does not carry on a conversation with anyone, points to most things she wants or we have to “read” her to pick up on what she needs. She sings the alphabet song, counts 1-20, says some sentences that I can comprehend but other sentences I cannot understand. Most times, I only know she is speaking actual sentences when she is going along with what she has “memorized” from commercials or movies while watching them- sometimes she just sits down and recites the movies and commercials from memory, although her words “jumble” together to the point where someone who didn’t know her wouldn’t know she was actually talking. She also loves to cuddle, hug, and play with other children, and she seems to understand some commands very well, and at other times she does not.

I read in the above book that “experts” are too quick to label a child “slow”, autistic, or as having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder when the child is only highly intelligent, strong willed, or just going at his or her own time-frame when it comes to social interactions and learning the practicalities of everyday life. Many of the late talkers in his study grew up to be engineers, mathematicians, or in other fields which require significant analytical skills. I am not suggesting that my daughter will be a genius. I just have a feeling that she should be allowed to “prosper” naturally. Certain people-those who haven’t had children in 30-60 years and one controlling, passive aggressive doctor (forgive me God for the criticism) who wouldn’t respect my questions and suggestions as a parent-think she needs help! I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with similar children, I would love your input! I have already read about parents of adult children who had similar “difficulties” as children and had no medical intervention; those adults are doing well.

I do not want to overlook a “problem” that may in fact exist. I am very nervous about taking my daughter to a specialist who may interpret a problem where there is none. I know I’m probably answering my own question, but…

What do you think?
A specialist can’t always tell the difference in my opinion, but thank you soooo much Sari Lynn for your insight!
Thank you Happymomof2. All I can say is that I know what you mean about worrying when I shouldn’t and being made to feel that what is actually “normal” is a delay or problem. I know I shouldn’t worry. My gut tells me everything is okay. It’s only an insecurity that gets me to ask for other people’s opinions about my daughter. I am a stay at home mom and will continue to work with her in a steady fashion. I know she will “catch up!”
Lauren R, I will surely take your advice! Thanks for the info! I worry about being impressionable and influenced if I were to find services available to my daughter, but realizing that I would be in total control of her health and safety help me to not be afraid to work with the professionals if I have to!
ADDED: In the meantime, why don’t you read information from reputable, science-based sources rather than pop-culture sensationalistic books (see below for links).
The Einstein story makes me crazy: Einstein was a genius in one particular area, but a total incompetent in many social (communication!) areas,~Anonymous

Anonymous, it seems as though you’re trying to be “kind” in your response. But, I don’t feel comfortable. I worry enough about my daughter, which is why I’m afraid to go to a specialist who may refer to her as “incompetent”! So, what would that make the specialist? Maybe she does need speech therapy, but I will be sure not to go to someone who labels her “incompetent”! Who says you do well in all your social interactions with others-you just learn to disguise your “fumbles” through the way you’ve learned to communicate!
I stated “I know that there are excellent professionals out there but, if there are any PARENTS with SIMILAR children, I would love your input!”
EDIT: THANK YOU so much for your post Beetlemilk. I will take heed to and look into all the info you have given me!

admin answers:

You are the foremost expert on your child, not any doctor.

I am very similar to your daughter and am 38 yrs old. My father has similarities too. In 1975 I was referred to a behavioral psychologist for peculiar vernacular, and addressing my parents by their names and not pronouns. I was promptly diagnosed ‘Autistic’. I went on to receive many diagnoses, most which were inaccurate like 1978’s school psychologist Stanford-Binet IQ test that resulted in mentally retarded. An independent test I hit the ceiling and was diagnosed as super gifted. I am very bright, I have some social quirks, its functional. I’ve gotten married, had children, held a job, drive, graduated many times from college. I’ve been diagnosed 7x as autistic, 3 were diagnosed asperger’s.

My father was diagnosed Autistic in 1950. He is a director and psychologist for a residential autistic setting. He is thrice times married. He is gifted, has a rather flat affect most of the time and is difficult to engage in conversation. He was hyperlexic, reading @ age 2. He is asperger’s and was diagnosed in 1988 when I was.

I have a son diagnosed autistic and I disagree. Autism like ADHD is a catch-all diagnoses that is over diagnosed. My son has been dx ADHD as well. Really, he’s bipolar. (my background is a psych nurse for years)

Einstein was autistic and that doesn’t fit at least 299.00 or Autistic disorder. More like Bill Gates who is asperger’s.

Engineers and mathematicians are among the highest fields of autistic people in them, some studies say 20%. (My father’s father was an engineer, his mother was a CPA so math). My mother was bipolar, her mother was a mathematician.

Here’s what we know:
Your daughter is bright
She has an incredible rote memory
conversation skills are her area of weakness
she is using some delayed echolalia

Probably she would be diagnosed as on the autistic spectrum given the above and the overdiagnoses of it.

Help? What kind of help? She doesn’t need any help. I’m fine, my father is fine, my brother (dx PDD.NOS) is fine (information tech-computers). She can talk, and the articulation will come. What you can work on with her is conversation skills. Try to get some back and forth. Playdates 1:1.

My sons all get services but they are needed. I ignore a lot of what I don’t feel fits.

Intelligence testing is inaccurate for those without enough language to complete them, and they are inaccurate before age 6. I’ve scored a 56, 147-163 (7x)

http://asplanet.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=29&Itemid=63

So here are signs of asperger’s big deal.
Aspie Adult checklist (Alyson Bradley / www.asplanet.info – Sept. 2008 / updated May 2009):
1. Over think, analyze things,2. Prefer own company, 3. Obsessional interest, 4. Like routine, 5. Like rituals, 6. Collections, 7. Sensory problems, 8. Over focus on details, 9. Perfectionist, 10. Think outside the box!, 11. Cannot understand jokes, 12. Weird laugh and/or make odd noises,13. Nervous fidget, Stim, 14. Upset by crowds, shy, 15. Face doesn’t show emotion, 16. Very honest, can seem naïve, 17. Quirky, different somehow , 18. Cannot understand point of small talk, 19. Cannot understand society unwritten rules, 20. Bullied at school, work etc., 21. Lack of friends, socializing, 22. Friends much older or younger, 23. Mumbles, speaks to self, 24. Inappropriate emotions, response, 25. Connect well with animals, 26. Computer (Mr Spock) like logic, 27. Unexplained memory lapses, 28. Irregular sleeping patterns, 29. Hopeless or expert with maps, 30. Awkward, clumsy, bad body posture….

ON the site above the AS test I score a 44/50 with a score of 32 being most likely aspergers and an average female score of 11.

ETA: Sure

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Teenagers

William asks…

how do i know if i have bipolar disorder or high function autism?

i think i might be bipolar and i also think i might be autistic. whats the best way to tell? what are symptoms?

admin answers:

I don’t know much about autism ..but I know a lot about bipolar..because ..that would be me! If you have this chemical imbalance..you will have really big changes in moods. Not just changes but going from being really talkative..outgoing..”smart” creative..just about the finest person you know…to feeling like the whole world is closing in on you..like you can’t possible be worth anything to anyone..like you aren’t capable of getting your act together, because you really have no act!
One side is Manic / (mania) the other side is severe depression..
If you think this is what you have…you can’t fix it by yourself.. If you could ..you would have by now. There are medications available, that can be prescribed by your doctor. Most of them have minor side effects. It takes them about 3 weeks to get into your system before you can tell much difference. Bipolar is also a much tossed around term right now. Everyone and his dog thinks he must be bipolar because his life is a mess and he’s moody. Symptoms like these can just be part of everyday life…especially for a teenager. You have so much going on in your body tat it’s amazing it can go to sleep and wake up everyday! I think autism is more of a general “non ability” to fit into social situations, andlife in general. It comes with actiung out behavior. It doesn’t come with the strong on and off black and white emotional swings that bipolar does. Check on line..you’ll find more stuff than you’ll want! Basically, if you think this may be your problem,call you doctor and have a talk with him. He can run some tests and tell you more about your options. All I know is…life doesn’t have to HURT…life is a struggle for everyone..but it doesn’t have to hurt! Think about this…do some more checking and then call your doctor. The medications available are wonderful..IF…the two of you can figure out what is wrong ..it can be fixed,or at least made much better good luck ?

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The Perfect ABA Classroom

ABA is bigger than Autism.

ABA is not just a reputable and empirically supported treatment method for managing the symptoms of Autism. It’s much larger than that.

B.F. Skinner, the father of Operant Conditioning wrote in the book “Walden Two” about a fictional society based on everyday application of behavioral sciences. Skinner spent most of his life trying to make people understand that applying behavioral principles to everyday life could only improve society. At the time, Skinner’s writings were considered odd and unrealistic. Public opinion today hasn’t changed that much.

People still have the misconception that ABA is just for people with Autism. Or ABA is just about making bad kids behave.

ABA is for anyone who wants to improve, manage, or reduce behaviors, and a behavior is any observable and measurable action. ABA is defined as: applying behavioral constructs and theories to significant social problems. So by definition, ABA is bigger than Autism because it is meant to address any significant social problem.

Behavior Specialists or BCBA’s arent “Autism Experts”. There are some BCBA’s who have never worked with anyone with Autism and have no desire to. Being an ABA professional means you study and seek to understand behavior and you have a responsibility to share behavioral knowledge with anyone who could benefit from it. That could be a business, an adult with OCD, or a school district.

ABA at its core is a way to teach. I’m not a teacher, but much of what I do involves helping individuals learn. If I am working with a 5 year old who bites his fingers whenever he feels anxious, it is my job to teach that child replacement behaviors to handle his anxiety so he will stop biting himself. All great ABA therapists are great teachers. What would really be amazing is if all great teachers were also trained in basic ABA.

If ABA wasn’t viewed as just an “Autism thing”, maybe schools would realize how valuable ABA knowledge would be for ANY educator.

What would classrooms look like if ABA was just seen as a standard of excellence in education?

ABA Principle Reinforcement – All children would be motivated to learn based on the specific interests of that child. Internal as well as external rewards would be used so that children would have fun learning and enjoy school. Any time a child displayed learning difficulties or showed disinterest in school, their reinforcement package would be re-evaluated for effectiveness.

ABA Principle Differentiated Instruction- Children would have modified curriculum based on how they learn best. Some children may write vocabulary words on the chalkboard, while other children might type their vocabulary words on the classroom computer. It would depend on the way each individual child learns.

ABA Principle Environment is Key to Understanding Behavior- Children displaying behavioral issues would not be viewed as stupid, bad, or stubborn. The environment, such as teaching style, reinforcement, or an over-stimulating classroom, would be closely examined to look for factors maintaining poor behaviors. The ICEL method would be used so that the student is the last option to consider when learning problems happen.

ABA Principle Analysis of Data- Ongoing data analysis would be part of all curriculum, so teachers would know when a student needed new challenges or might need simpler tasks. Children in special education would be moved into inclusion classrooms based on performance data, and not based on administration preferences, or teacher opinion. This focus on not just collecting, but actually analyzing data would lead to higher accountability for teachers, districts, and administration.

ABA Principle Prompting & Fading- Prompting would be used to move a child from not knowing a skill, to knowing a skill. Prompt levels would vary depending on how much help the child needs, and reinforcement would increase as prompts decreased to encourage the child to desire to complete the task independently. All classrooms would use various prompting tools suited to the individual child so that each student in the classroom is performing to the best of their ability. For example students performing poorly in math would be allowed to take tests with calculators, and be paired with a higher performing student during independent task time. Any implemented prompts would be faded out eventually to prevent prompt dependency.

ABA Principle Conceptually Systematic- Conceptually systematic classrooms would have interventions and curriculum rooted in science. Science and research would drive critical decisions, not opinions, political hot topics, mandated testing requirements, or teacher preferences.

ABA Principle Behavior Management- ALL teachers would be trained in behavior management techniques. This would ensure more confident teachers who are thoroughly equipped to handle mild, moderate, or severe behaviors, and would reduce the need to shuttle children with behavioral problems into special education classrooms. All teachers would know how to conduct a FBA, create a behavioral intervention, and use EO to know when a student is highly motivated to learn.

ABA Principle Generalization & Maintenance- Curriculum content would be taught in multiple environments for all children to encourage retaining of information, and so the children can apply what has been learned. PE skills would be reinforced during recess time. English skills would be reinforced on field trips. Math skills would be reinforced in Art class. Review of previously learned skills would be embedded into the school day to ensure children are not regressing and to alert teachers if old material needs to be re-visited. Students who tend to lose old information more quickly than others will have their instruction modified to include more maintenance tasks.

ABA Principle 1:1 Ratio- Children would receive much of their instruction in a 1:1 or small group format (less than 5 children). The ratio would be kept small until the child has grasped the concept and is demonstrating learning, after that point large group instruction (more than 5 children) can be introduced for generalization, and social purposes. Classrooms would be smaller, and children would be divided into small groups based on ability and performance level.

ABA is for everybody. If educators, Speech Therapists, Occupational Therapists, etc., all had even a basic understanding of ABA it would only improve upon the services they offer and increase the quality of their instruction.

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Coping Mechanisms‘Classic’ autism / autism disorder‘Classic’ autism / autism disorder

Coping Mechanisms

A coping skill is a behavioral tool that may be used by individuals to offset or overcome hardship, disadvantage, or disability without correcting or removing the underlying condition. Coping skills are also sometimes called workarounds.

Virtually all living beings routinely utilize coping skills in everyday life. These are perhaps most obvious in response to physical disabilities. An easy example of the use of coping skills in the animal kingdom are three-legged dogs, which typically learn to overcome the obvious disability to become as agile and mobile as their four-legged counterparts, whether born with the impairment or having received it due to an injury.

When helping humans deal with particular problems, trained counselors have found that a focus of attention on coping skills (with or without remedial action) often helps individuals.
The range of successful coping skills varies widely with the problems to be overcome.

However, the learning and practice of coping skills are generally regarded as very helpful to most individuals. Even the sharing of learned coping skills with others is often beneficial.

When coping methods are overused, they may actually worsen one’s condition. Alcohol and cocaine, for example, may provide temporary escape from one’s problems, but, with excess use, ultimately result in greater hardship.

One group of coping skills are coping mechanisms, defined as the skills used to reduce stress. In psychological terms these are consciously used skills, and defense mechanisms are their unconscious counterpart. Overuse of coping mechanisms (such as avoiding problems or working obsessively) and defense mechanisms (such as denial and projection) may aggravate one’s problem rather than remedy it.

In psychology, coping is the process of successfully managing difficult circumstances, expending effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master, minimize, reduce or tolerate stress or conflict.

In dealing with disease, people tend to use one of the two main coping strategies: either problem focused or emotion focused coping.

People using problem focused strategies try to deal with the cause of the problem. They do this by finding out information on the disease, learning new skills to manage it and rearranging their lives around the disease.

Tagged as: Coping Mechanisms

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Some Basic Facts About Autism and Related Developmental Delays

Autism disorders affect children as early as six months of age and are apparent by seven years of age. Children with autism experience the world differently than the rest of us. They see things differently. They learn things differently. They will even communicate differently. It is especially important to understand this. These children are often ostracized within the community because most people just don’t understand what they are experiencing. These children are not sick, they are not less intelligent than the rest of us, but they are simply different.

These disorders involve trouble dealing with social situations and interacting on a social level. However, this is the main symptom of autism present themselves in pair or groups, this is the determinant for diagnosing the difference in most cases. Even children diagnosed with autism present the disorder differently. Children with developmental delays and autism related syndrome simply lack the ingrained intuition needed in social situations. They are unable to read body language, emotional cues, as well as environmental ones. They dislike changes in their routine and this can present them as stubborn and willful, argumentative and unmanageable. This is where patience from their parents and teacher becomes a mandatory part of their life.

If diagnosed young, children with autism can be taught the necessary skills needed in dealing with everyday life. Keep in mind that they are never going to handle it the way other people do and depending on the severity of their symptoms, they may always need a caregiver of some sort. Still, the goal is to help such children deal with their life, learning experiences. It is equally important for people surrounding them be as comfortably and well-adjusted as possible. Placing them in an educational environment specifically geared towards children with autism and other developmental disorders is the first step in this helpful therapy.

Children with these disorders need to feel that they are still loved. Even if they don’t show affection in the normal way, compassion, nurturing, and love is still felt and the lack of such emotional contact can leave the child feeling even more anti-social, depressed, and lonely. This is dangerous to any child’s well-being and especially that of a child with autism. Due to certain physical characteristics such as odd facial expressions, children with this disorder are often bullied and picked on by other kids their age. So, while it is necessary for such children to interaction with people and children in social situations, it may be beneficial for most of their time to be spent in an environment of understanding and acceptance.

The world needs to be taught a few things as well, not just these children. We need to begin to see them as a part of our society not as a stigma. Parents should be teaching their children the values of acceptance, patience, kindness and compassion for those different than themselves. It takes the cooperation of both sides to achieve peace.

For the latest videos and training information on child development as well as books and curricula on Autism please visit childdevelopmentmedia.com.

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Coping Mechanisms‘Classic’ autism / autism disorder‘Classic’ autism / autism disorder

Coping Mechanisms

A coping skill is a behavioral tool that may be used by individuals to offset or overcome hardship, disadvantage, or disability without correcting or removing the underlying condition. Coping skills are also sometimes called workarounds.

Virtually all living beings routinely utilize coping skills in everyday life. These are perhaps most obvious in response to physical disabilities. An easy example of the use of coping skills in the animal kingdom are three-legged dogs, which typically learn to overcome the obvious disability to become as agile and mobile as their four-legged counterparts, whether born with the impairment or having received it due to an injury.

When helping humans deal with particular problems, trained counselors have found that a focus of attention on coping skills (with or without remedial action) often helps individuals.
The range of successful coping skills varies widely with the problems to be overcome.

However, the learning and practice of coping skills are generally regarded as very helpful to most individuals. Even the sharing of learned coping skills with others is often beneficial.

When coping methods are overused, they may actually worsen one’s condition. Alcohol and cocaine, for example, may provide temporary escape from one’s problems, but, with excess use, ultimately result in greater hardship.

One group of coping skills are coping mechanisms, defined as the skills used to reduce stress. In psychological terms these are consciously used skills, and defense mechanisms are their unconscious counterpart. Overuse of coping mechanisms (such as avoiding problems or working obsessively) and defense mechanisms (such as denial and projection) may aggravate one’s problem rather than remedy it.

In psychology, coping is the process of successfully managing difficult circumstances, expending effort to solve personal and interpersonal problems, and seeking to master, minimize, reduce or tolerate stress or conflict.

In dealing with disease, people tend to use one of the two main coping strategies: either problem focused or emotion focused coping.

People using problem focused strategies try to deal with the cause of the problem. They do this by finding out information on the disease, learning new skills to manage it and rearranging their lives around the disease.

Tagged as: Coping Mechanisms

View the original article here

How Auditory Stimulation Helps an Hurts and Autistic Child

Sounds are a part of our everyday life, and so when dealing with an autistic child who has sensory problems, sound is one of the first things you should learn to control, especially in a learning environment. Sound can both be hurtful and helpful for an autistic child. Because each autistic individual is different, you must closely observe him or her to find out what types of reactions you can expect from auditory sensory stimulation.

Loud or frightening sounds may be the most difficult type of sensory stimulation in an autistic child’s life. Many of our routine daily activities include such sounds, hurting the growth process. Autistic children can not and will not learn if they are frightened. For example, parents often find that they have a difficult time toilet training their autistic children. This may be due to the scary sound of the toilet flushing; witch could be overpowering to and autistic child. Instead, try using a potty seat away from the actual toilet until they get used to the idea. Another example is loud or crunchy foods. If your autistic child is a picky eater, try to notice specifically which foods he or she blatantly refuses to eat. Sometimes, food simply sounds too loud when crunching in an autistic child’s mouth, and these loud noises can hurt his or her ears. If this is the case with your child, provide alternative soft foods instead of crunchy carrots, apples, or potato chips. Other loud sounds, such as a vacuum cleaner, may hurt your child’s ears. Try to do these activities when he or she is not in the room, or consider providing your child with earplugs that he or she can use if the world gets too loud.

Sounds can also cause fixation. Some children, for example, constantly hum and seem fixated on the sights and sounds of lawn mowers. Use this fixation to be beneficial. For example, read stories about lawn mowers or use the humming in conjunction with a song. Music is a great way in which autistic individuals can learn, because sound is a form of nonverbal communication. Teachers and parents should use this tool in learning environments. The key is to make sound work for you and your child. Autism is a difficult disorder to handle, so by being sensitive to your child’s specific needs, you can help him or her learn to deal with the sounds of everyday life.

To read about early signs of autism and mild autism, visit Autism Diagnosis.
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Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide Review – It Is Not As Difficult As It Seems

If you think handling a child is difficult, wait until you handle a child with Aspergers. Kids with this disorder have difficulties in social interaction and often display intense interests on specific things. Aspergers is an autism spectrum that most parents would give up on. I hope you are not one of these parents. And Dave Angel, the author of Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide, does not want you to. So, in order to help the parents or relatives of a child with Asperger Syndrome, he developed and published a guide for all of you.

The Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide has been used by thousands of people to help them in their everyday life with a kid that has Aspergers. Most parents of a child with Aspergers would split up because of the strains and pressure in taking care of them. If you are alone taking care of your child or relative with this disorder, it is a tough life you got.

You always need to face the pressure when you go to gatherings or occasions and you need to bring your child. You can not do what you really want because you need to guide him or her every now and then since the child is not very good with these. And the worst part is that even you, the parent or guardian, have problems in communicating with him or her. You would feel that you can not get to know the child better and see the world in his eyes.

In order to cope with the kid, you need to give your whole heart in taking care of him or her. These kids mostly want something rather than everything and they give intense desire for this thing. As the guardian, you need to always be there and watch him do the same routines over and over again. You need to adjust to the very sensitive senses of the child and most of all, always understand their feelings.

Taking care of a child with this syndrome is not as hard as it seems. However, you need to be guided in order to understand them and give the world they are comfortable to live in. Dave’s Parenting Aspergers Resource Guide is the one you need. You can get yours here http://bit.ly/ParentingAspergersResourceGuide with a money back guarantee so that you have nothing to lose! And do not forget, everything that you will do from the guide, do it with all your heart; that will make everything easier.

 

 

Michelle talks about important solutions that can be found on the Internet regarding parenting and families. She understands the needs of a child in a family and how important it is to educate and nurture kids the right way, which is why she contributes quality articles to ArticlesBase.com.
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Tips To Handle Behaviours Of Autistic Children

Caring for autistic children can be difficult, yet there are steps and actions that can be taken by parents of autistic children to help them deal with the situations that will arise. Children who carry this autistic disorder can start showing signs as early as age 2, and if caught early, caregivers can learn to better cope with the disorder, as well as helping the child. Autism affects social skills and communications skills, among other areas, so getting an early diagnosis will help in implementing steps to help the child learn to express themselves better and to deal with the people around them and their surroundings.

Everyone has seen children who behave badly on purpose, and children with autism may exhibit some of these same behaviors, but most often they will do so unintentionally. The bad behaviors that autistic children exhibit may actually be a product of what is going on around them.

If they become startled by someone or something, then they may act in a way that seems inappropriate. While each child with autism will handle situations differently, being calm and directing the child away from the situation will most often work well. It is important to have a routine to calm them when autistic behavior arises.

It is important to understand the cues that each autistic child will give out, as these children may act a certain way when someone approaches them. They may become excited or exhibit certain behaviors when they are in stressful situations. Do they have a sensitivity to bright lights?

An autistic child will most likely have patterns that will show when they are put into some specific situations, so understanding these patterns and cues will help you to advert otherwise stressful situations for the child. Little tips like learning the autistic child’s cues can make everyday life easier for the caregiver and the child.

Early diagnosis of autistic children can aide in the increased development of their social skills and the ability to better take care of themselves on a daily basis. This can be extremely important to an autistic child and their family. A child with autism will exclude certain behaviors that may be inappropriate or considered as bad.

These behaviors are normally not on purpose, but can be controlled to some extent by having routines in place and being very calm when the child starts acting out. Knowing how to handle situations that come with autism can be extremely helpful for the child and those who are caring for them.

Enrich your knowledge further about autistic children from Mike Selvon portal. We appreciate your feedback at our autism spectrum disorders blog where a free gift awaits you.
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Some Of The Ways To Cure Asperger’S Syndrome

Dealing with Asperger’s syndrome will positively be a complicated task.  So as to work with a kid with Aspergers, you wish to comply to some terribly stringent guidelines and follow them rigorously for as long as they may be needed. The key to making this treatment successful is to try to to it frequently and assimilate it to your everyday life.

At 1st, it would be rather tough and even annoying for a few extent. However, as you progress, you’ll notice that things would be a heap easier to handle. In the top, you’ll have a system that’s operating and it will benefit each you and also the person with Asperger’s syndrome for the better. can conjointly be beneficial to contemplate natural treatment strategies with medication. The 2 approaches will be widely totally different and will have various impact on an individual. Here are some ways in which to treat Asperger’s syndrome naturally.

Look for a Sensible Diet Plan

This may appear like quite a small tip, but in the long run, it can actually work wonders. The diet of a kid who has Asperger’s syndrome can have a vital impact on their life. When we say a sensible diet arrange, we have a tendency to mean something that’s balanced, not one thing excessive. It can take it slow before you establish the essential nutrients that are required for the child. You will try consulting a nutritionist who specifically practices on this space because they hold the most information concerning this topic. Specifically gluten free and casein free product should be thought of as part of any dietary plan.

Always Encourage Communication

Communication certainly helps a heap in building the basic skills of a child who has Asperger’s syndrome. Parent’s ought to forever encourage a child to speak and interact, especially with peers. Building social and communication skills is exceptionally necessary for a child with Asperger’s. It will facilitate them become additional engaged in meeting alternative individuals, which will in flip, aid their development.

Use Positive Reinforcement within the Treatment of Asperger’s Syndrome

For a child with Asperger’s syndrome, we can’t emphasize enough making an attempt positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement is when someone commends and encourages the actions of another person. Studies have shown that positive reinforcement might not perpetually help a kid, however for a child with Asperger’s syndrome, it’s certainly price trying. But bear in mind that positive reinforcement should not be abused. It must be done carefully or else it can appear artificial.
number of websites for parents of children with Aspergers. To know about this visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com

Dave Angel is an skilled social worker and has helped children with Aspergers Syndrome. To know about this visit http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com.
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