Tag Archives: Environment

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

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How To See Autism As A Genuine Perspective And The Reasoning Of An Autistic Mind

For starters I am an Aspie, an individual with Asperger’s Syndrome, a mild form of autism. It seems awfully strange that I am autistic, yet I have such great language skills, especially with typing. I would write with my hand, but my hand-writing is illegible. With that being said, I have a lot to say about my perspective as an autistic man.

First off, if you know someone with autism, then you have more than likely been touched by said person, as we are often very gifted in one way or another, despite our difficulties with communicating with those we interact with. We all feel a need to belong, whether we are autistic or not! We want nothing more than to please our loved-ones, and sometimes this is hard, as we tend to go overboard with things. Autism often comes with what is known as stemming, something that we use to normalize our environment.

Let me take you on an adventure inside of an autistic mind, and how you should view autism as a genuine, yet unique perspective!

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects the normal-functioning of the brain, in an otherwise healthy mind. The way we see the world is above and beyond normal understanding and functioning in the world, where we sometimes don’t understand our culture and society, and when we oftentimes dislike the cultural-norms, as we see the world as too entangled with social-customs, where problems could be solved with instead logic and reasoning, while at the same time we could affect the world with a high-capacity of intuition.

Autistic people feel that the world is unstable, mostly because of the social taboos, which are otherwise natural to us. The world would be much different if we made more sense, and not trying to control how we consume our culture. People want us to eat certain foods, when really we just want to enjoy our meals the way we want, in a healthy way, a way that most people feel is immoral. Why exactly do people believe that all wild-strawberries are poisonous? They hear it from their parents, who heard it from their grandparents, but why don’t they do their own research, or ask a professional?

We often hear that we can’t use our imagination for fun things, that we must work hard, everyday, all day, something that we want to change, as we know that humans are very social animals, and all we want is to explore our imaginations! Our perspectives show our wish to reconnect with our true-nature, the nature of exploring and enjoying life, while everyone else puts too many expectations on us. Everyone should just do what it is that is most enjoyable in life, and not being a drone!

As mentioned above, an autistic person only wants to get enjoyment and entertainment out of life. If everyone were to do what they enjoyed, the world would be a very happy and satisfied place! There are always jobs that you will enjoy, even if it isn’t extravagant. You, believe it or not, can enjoy being a janitor, but if you don’t enjoy it, you only take the job because you feel that “somebody has to do it”! Look, there are people out there who would enjoy that line of work, so leave it to them, and go after what you enjoy!

The autistic mind takes in from their environment, but they take what they get out of it and turn it into something remarkable! They try to make their living more meaningful and enjoyable, also more entertaining. If you were to live as an autistic person, you would totally change your attitude about how people should function! All you would want is to live a life that is meaningful, and you would constantly try to make the world a better place to live, not just for you, but for all who are in your perception.

Joseph D. Smith employs the Aspiezine, a topical blog and social network for those affected by and with autism, whether you are autistic or not!

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The Easy Way to Tell A Child They Have Autism

Parents of children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder often fret about when to tell their child they have Autism and how.

What if we didn’t have to tell our children they have Autism?

Wouldn’t it be nice if we lived in a world without disclosure?

Ah, yes, it would but that might be a bit unrealistic.

But what if I told you there was an easy way to tell your child?

What if I told you that you can create a positive experience for telling your child he or she has Autism?

Do you think this is possible? I say yes and here is why.

Let’s face it we are all different. We all relate to the world uniquely and teaching that to our children is the most important thing any parent can begin to do at an early age. When a parent can matter-of-factly point out the similarities and differences among themselves as a family and beyond then being different becomes less of an issue. Honoring and celebrating each of our differences in a valued fashion rather than waiting for it to be pointed out and discussed when it becomes obvious gives any label less emphasis and is more likely to be seen as a positive.

So how does one put a positive spin on telling their child they are on the Autism spectrum? By developing mindsets and environments that not only expect differences but value and respect them as well.

Allow me to paint a picture of how this might occur.

Be proactive. Begin early on to establish an environment that discusses similarities and differences in a positive light. Identify each person’s learning style, temperament, personality, sensory issues and idiosyncrasies and focus on the positive aspects of them. As attention is paid to the benefits of each it is only natural for human beings to gravitate and create more of the same thus minimizing the negative. Don’t wait for Autism to become noticeable to your child or others. Doing so risks negatively altering your child’s perception of self. Avoid this by developing a positive and authentic self-image of who she is early on, one that does not have to be changed or explained later on.

Acquire a vocabulary without labels. Be mindful to use language that emphasizes strengths in relation to challenges. When someone does something well, name it as an asset and celebrate it. Point to the fact that everyone is good at something that might be a bit more difficult for someone else in the family or elsewhere to accomplish. This will encourage non-judgmental comparison and can even promote a mentoring atmosphere, where individuals use their strengths to help other family members who are challenged in that same area. The ability to objectively see the strengths each family member, relative, friend and others have normalizes the fact that we are ALL good at something. The trick is to do this uniformly and acknowledge the strengths of everyone in the family, including us adults.

Balance every challenge with a strength. Discuss ways to use your strengths to compensate for your challenges. Occasionally sit down with everyone and discuss how each of you utilize your strengths to make accommodations for the things that you may struggle with. For example, sitting in class listening to the teacher doesn’t work well because you are not an auditory learner. You struggle to take notes because your penmanship is poor. So you augment your note-taking with your talent for art. Over the years you have developed a type of artistic shorthand that you use to take unique notes adding pictures and symbols. This appeals to your visual learning style and helps you remember the lesson better.

Normalize everyone’s challenges. If your child’s differences came in the form of diabetes, epilepsy, poor eyesight or food allergies would you wait to address it? No, you would describe it as “this is the way your body works and this is what it needs to function at it’s best.” Why are we so much more sensitive and touchy when it comes to something that affects the mind? Why can’t we be just as matter-of-fact about the way a child’s brain or nervous system works? Explaining to a child, “This is how your nervous system works” or “This is how your brain is wired” helps to paint a realistic picture of how their body functions. This is powerful information for children to have in order to self advocate, keep themselves safe and in control of what they need to maximize their potential.

Describing Autism without using the word Autism can definitely be accomplished but only to a point. Following the recommendations above can delay or may even prevent the asking of the awkward question most parents fear, “What is wrong with me?” or “Why am I different?” Unfortunately the day may still come when your child wants to have a name for his differences whether he sees them as positive or negative.

Should the time come when your child really wants to know what her brain style is called then you need to let her know the label society gives it. But if you began early in her life to lay the affirmative groundwork discussed above then the label is apt to be just another piece of factual information rather than a devastating blow to your child’s sense of self. Always remember that the most important message will be in the descriptors you use rather than the label itself.

Connie Hammer, MSW, parent educator, consultant and coach, guides parents of young children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder to uncover abilities and change possibilities. Visit her website http://www.parentcoachingforautism.com/ to get your FREE resources – a parenting e-course, Parenting a Child with Autism – 3 Secrets to Thrive and a weekly parenting tip newsletter, The Spectrum.

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Autism Behavior – Ways to Beat The Summer Blues!

Given the nature of autism behavior, summer can actually be more difficult for kids with autism than most. In fact, many parents with kids who have autism dread the start of summer. Why? Summer wrecks with kids’ routine. Summer is full of endless days with nothing to do and no plan, no routine, no schedule. If there is one surefire thing you could possibly do to cause tantrums and bad autism behavior in kids with autism, it is to remove their schedule.

Beat the Summertime Blues

All year long, kids with autism can at least rely on a few simple things. The yellow school bus which takes them to school, their classes and activities during school, and the yellow school bus to take them home. Love them or hate them, at least they’re there. And having your day structured in some way, for a child with autism, is so much infinitely better than doing nothing.

So what do you do? Well, you have several options.

1. Extended School Year

Some schools will offer extended school year programs to those at risk for falling behind or those who need the extra enrichment and learning that extended school year programs provide. Many kids with autism need consistent learning or else they will start the school year way behind where they left off. They might even end the school year ahead, but they will forget all they learned during the summer and often regress without the structure that school provides.

Often, autism behavior that is problematic masks problems underneath – in this case, that the child needs more stimulation and engaging activities. Ask your special education teacher or principal about this option.

2. Summer Camps

There are, of course, also summer camps. There are dozens of different kinds of summer camps you could send your child to. Decide what is most important for you and your child. Do you want to work on social and communication skills in an autism focused environment? There are camps for that. Do you want to send your child to camp focused on his interests, such as a Lego camp, sports, or arts and crafts? There are camps for that.

Your local Town Recreation department usually has a selection of camps for kids in the summer at relatively low-cost. Often, they will even have summer camp programs designed for those with special needs. You can often get an aide to help your child participate in these activities. The key is planning ahead. Start early. Find out as early as possible in the year whom you will have to talk to and get permission from to get your child the services they need over the summer.

Doing so gives you the best chance of taking the negative autism behavior symptoms you often see in your child during the summer and turning them into positive ones.

Summer Camp Options

You can look at a site like autism.about.com/od/schoolandsummer/tp/camplistings.htm camps to find autism related summer camps that might be good for your child — or just talk to your local autism society chapter or doctor. Sometimes you can find a great program locally, and sometimes you have to travel for it. Such programs usually incorporate therapy, academics, social skills learning, fields trips and just plain fun into a smorgasbord for autism learning and increasing positive autism behavior.

3. Create a summer learning routine for your child

Learning does not have to stop just because school has. Many experts will recommend that you develop units of learning during the summer to enrich your child’s learning. In other words, make your home into a part-time school. Have theme weeks, such as learning about sea creatures with a trip to the aquarium. Learn about mammals and take a trip to the zoo. Take advantage of Internet lesson plans and learning resources.

Try to build a routine for your child over the summer so they will know what to expect. Designate some time each day for learning about a topic of interest to your child, then some time for an activity in the community like the swimming pool, the movies or a museum.

Community activities

The nice things about museums are they often free or low-cost, and some have special programs for kids with special needs. Kids’ museums in particular sometimes have autism only days where kids with autism and their parents can have the whole place to themselves. This means they won’t have to explain autism behavior to others and can be free to express themselves however they want.

Get into arts and crafts, or develop new hobbies. Summer is a time for learning and exploring interests that there wasn’t time for during the school year. Just make sure there is some routine to all this, and you’ll be all set. Your child will be enriched, happy, and you will see positive autism behavior (less or no meltdowns, more engagement) if you find a way to engage your child in a routine this summer.

And for further tips and techniques to help children with autism live a happy and fulfilled life, go to the web site AspergersSociety.org and http://www.autismparenthood.com/. There you will be able to sign up for the free Asperger’s and Autism newsletter as well as get additional information to help your loved ones thrive on the autism spectrum.

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Autism Linked To Industrial Food Or Environment

Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Nutrition / Diet
Article Date: 16 Apr 2012 – 13:00 PDT

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4 and a half stars4 and a half stars
A new study in Clinical Epigenetics, suggests that the epidemic of autism amongst children in the U.S. may be associated with the typical American diet. The study by Renee Dufault and his team explores how mineral deficiencies, affected by dietary factors, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), could have a potential impact on how the human body frees itself of common toxic chemicals, for instance, pesticides and mercury.

The release comes shortly after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report that estimates a 78% increase in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) between 2002 and 2008 amongst eight year olds. At present, 1 in 88 children has ASD, with the rate being almost five times higher in boys than girls.

Dr. David Wallinga, a physician at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) and co-author of the study, said:

“To better address the explosion of autism, it’s critical we consider how unhealthy diets interfere with the body’s ability to eliminate toxic chemicals, and ultimately our risk for developing long-term health problems like autism.”

Leading author, Commander (ret.) Renee Dufault (U.S. Public Health Service), a former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) toxicologist, developed an innovative scientific approach called “macroepigenetics”, which describes the subtle side effects of HFCS consumption, as well as other dietary factors on the human body and their relationship with chronic disorders. By using the model, researchers can take nutritional and environmental factors as well as genetic makeup into account and observe how these interact and contribute to potential developments of a certain health outcome.

Dufault, who is also a licensed special education teacher and founder of the Food Ingredient and Health Research Institute (FIHRI) remarks:

“With autism rates skyrocketing, our public educational system is under extreme stress.”

The authors also discovered, as part of the current study, that the number of autistic children who receive special educational services in the U.S. has risen by 91% between 2005 and 2010.

Given that autism and related disorders affect brain development, the researchers decided to establish how environmental and dietary factors, such as HFCS consumption, could together contribute to the disorder. For instance, consuming HFCS is associated with the dietary loss of zinc. Zinc insufficiency has a negative impact on the body’s ability to eliminate heavy metals. Several heavy metals, including arsenic, cadmium and mercury are potent toxins that have adverse effects on young children’s brain development.

Other beneficial minerals, like calcium, are also affected by HFCS consumption, as a loss of calcium further aggravates the devastating impact of exposure to lead on fetuses and children’s brain development. Insufficient calcium levels can also debilitate the body’s ability of getting rid of organophosphates, which belong to a class of pesticides that the EPA, as well as independent scientists have long ago recognized as having especially toxic affects on the young developing brain.

Dr. Richard Deth, a professor of Pharmacology at Northeastern University and a co-author of the study explained:

“Rather than being independent sources of risk, factors like nutrition and exposure to toxic chemicals are cumulative and synergistic in their potential to disrupt normal development. These epigenetic effects can also be transmitted across generations. As autism rates continue to climb it is imperative to incorporate this new epigenetic perspective into prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies.”

How and why children develop autism is a complex issue that is influenced by numerous different factors. This study has provided an insight into the comprehensive interaction between several of the factors that could lead to the development of this debilitating neurodevelopment disorder. However, in order to control the autism epidemic within the U.S., researchers must continue to analyze the affects of industrialized food systems and exposure to environmental toxins on ASD. These factors are of crucial importance and further research must focus on these key areas to gain further insight.

Written By Petra Rattue
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. “A macroepigenetic approach to identify factors responsible for the autism epidemic in the United States”
Renee Dufault, Walter J Lukiw, Raquel Crider, Roseanne Schnoll, David Wallinga and Richard Deth
Clinical Epigenetics, April 2012, doi:10.1186/1868-7083-4-6 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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posted by Genz on 16 Apr 2012 at 2:48 pm

Are autism rates really climbing or is the diagnosis of autism climbing? Recently an article was published that showed ADHD as way over diagnosed, especially in males. Is autism the current diagnosis de jour or is there a real problem?

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posted by B. J. Brinton on 16 Apr 2012 at 10:44 pm

My husband had been eating 2 mackerel sandwiches a day for a bout a year prior to our autistic son’s birth. My husband had also been taking an anti fungal and a hair restorer

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posted by WillDav on 17 Apr 2012 at 4:02 am

Although a non-scientist, I’ve researched the causation of non-communicable diseases, including autism, for almost 30 years.

Most of the increased incidence of autism is probably due to increased awareness of the condition, broadening diagnostic criteria and sociological factors.

However, my own research concludes that prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals which disrupt GABA(A) receptor functioning also contribute. These chemicals include insecticides, phthalates, methyl mercury, bisphenol A and, possibly most important, folic acid. More information here:

nfkbdiseases.wordpress.com

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posted by Tamara Quarry on 17 Apr 2012 at 8:54 am

The govt has just given each school district the OPTION to not use pink slime in our school lunches, which we will need to voice loudly so they make a change, how about let’s fight to get artificial ingredients, and toxic chemicals out next!! High Fructose Corn Syrup is linked to Autism, google and see how it is changed by processing so it is not recognized as a “food” to our bodies! Let’s fight for our kids!

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posted by Angela Flynn on 17 Apr 2012 at 4:38 pm

I truly believe these food processes and additives are doing a great deal of harm.

simplesensibilities.com/2012/04/05/pink-slime-growth-hormones-and-sugar/

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posted by CC Delray on 17 Apr 2012 at 5:51 pm

I have to respond to Tamara Quarry – you are misinformed as to what ‘pink slime’ is. Chef Jamie Oliver needed a ratings boost. He started this mess and parents like yourself parroted the information. Google the information to inform yourself instead of being a parrot. ‘Pink Slime’ is nor more damaging then fresh peas. ‘Pink Slime’ is the last part of the meat next to the fat that is separated by machine and mixed back into ground meat products. The photos used for the articles were photos of processed turkey not processed red meat. ‘Pink Slime’ is meat. Parrot parents, like yourself, cause more damage in our schools and politics than any other segment of the population except maybe parrot politicians. We do not have a honest viable connection of the cause of autism. We do know that the criteria for the diagnosis of autism has been lowered. The spectrum of autism labels has increased.
I have friends with autistic children. I know first hand what this dis order does to a child and the family. Research is needed for this as well as the horrible deadly disease type 1 diabetes. You probably think eating sugar gives children type 1 diabetes. You and other parrot parents have no idea of the damage you cause to the research/investigation of diseases with your off the wall
cult like attachment to mis information that you repeat as if repeating it over and over will make it true. Any insight into the cause of Autism is greatly needed. Read information – learn about the issue instead of parroting nonsense. Any viable lead into the cause of diseases need to be unemotionally investigated.
The science needs to be proved to provide any help not hysteria as you put forth.

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posted by Freedom on 17 Apr 2012 at 6:05 pm

In the old day a lot of the severe case would have been labeled retarded +/- autistic characteristics. Most would have called the child retarded. Today all those severe case are called autism with pervasive developmental delays. Everyone calls them autistic. Also more milder cases are labeled today. But the evidence suggests there is also an increase frequency today. Food, air pollution, advanced paternal age are likely some of the causes. The crap most parents feed their child today is child abuse whether it causes autism or not. It starts with a poor maternal diet during pregnancy, limited or no breast feeding and then gets worse from there. Most parents today just do what’s easiest for them and not what’s best for the child.

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posted by Ted on 17 Apr 2012 at 6:26 pm

While the government does put limits on toxic chemicals in our food and in other products we use/ consume daily, have they studied these toxins when using multiple products with theae similar compounds daily, weekly, monthly? What impact do these have in combination and their accumultions in the human body and in the development of our most vunerable population, our children? Are companies squelching these potential dangers with their lobbying efforts in the quest for profit? Can we push our government to do what is best for our country’s future health?

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‘Autism Linked To Industrial Food Or Environment’

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What Is Asperger’s Syndrome And How Does It Affect Adults?

Asperger’s syndrome is a development disorder related to the autistic spectrum, but at a much higher level of functioning. Unlike those with autism, those who have Asperger’s syndrome generally learn the same way average people do, learning to speak at a young age and eventually attending school in the same classes and at the same age of their peers. Like autism however, those with Asperger’s syndrome may have trouble understanding social or communication skills. This often results in being viewed as ‘weird’ by those around them who aren’t familiar with the disorder.

Asperger’s syndrome is typically diagnosed at an early age, but because those who have it are on the higher functioning end of the autism scale, it can go undiagnosed well into adulthood. This has been especially common in the past when the disorder wasn’t as well known and understood as it has become in recent years. Similar to autism, there is no cure and the exact cause of the disorder is unknown, however, it is possible to manage the symptoms, including clumsiness, obsessive routines, and sensitivity to environment changes. This is done with behavioral therapy, resulting in many adults with Asperger’s syndrome appearing mostly ‘normal’ with the exception of lack of social skills.

The lack of social skills doesn’t mean that all adults with Asperger’s appear rude, but rather they have trouble understanding social cues. For example, it’s not uncommon for those with Asperger’s syndrome to share a deep passion for something, whether it be horses or molecules. They may want to talk about this passion constantly, despite the listener growing visibly annoyed. This is because they don’t understand that sighing or looking at a watch means the listener is uninterested.

Due to this extreme passion, many adults with Asperger’s syndrome end up excelling in careers involving their interest. It’s not uncommon for adults with Asperger’s to become CEO’s or other high ranking positions, because unlike other employees, they don’t spend their time socializing with others, but rather learning as much as humanly possible about their passion.

What is the Asperger syndrome diagnostic scale?

The Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale, also known as ASDS, is a tool used to screen for children who might meet criteria for Asperger’s Syndrome. This quickly administered standardized test only takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. It is appropriate for children ages five through 18 years old. Autism experts Brenda Smith Myles, Stacy Jones-Bock, and Richard L. Simpson first published the ASDS in 2000.

The screening tool is standardized and uses percentiles to give an AS Quotient. This score predicts the likelihood that a child or adolescent has Asperger’s Syndrome. The test covers behaviors across several domains, including cognitive, maladaptive, social, sensory, motor, and language. The behaviors addressed are those behaviors typically seen in children with Asperger’s, as well as behaviors that are seen in children without an Autistic Disorder. The test contains 50 questions, all which are answered with a yes or no to indicate whether the behavior occurs.

The Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale has an administrative qualification level of B. This means that individuals who administer the ASDS must have a degree from an accredited four-year college. This degree must be completed in psychology, counseling, or speech and language pathology. The individual must also have completed coursework in test interpretation, psychometrics, educational statistics, or measurement theory or a license indicating appropriate training in the ethics and competency required for using psychological tests.

The respondent for the ASDS can be one of several individuals who are very familiar with the child or adolescent being tested. Parents and siblings are often the primary respondents. The child’s service providers, such as speech and language pathologists, therapists, and teachers can also act as respondents.

The Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale cannot be used in isolation to provide a diagnosis of Asperger’s. The ASDS is a screening tool to indicate the likelihood of the individual having Asperger’s. The AS Quotient can be used to indicate whether a professional should further evaluate the child in order to receive an official formal diagnosis.

One concern with the ASDS is that it has not been shown to reliably differentiate between Asperger Syndrome and the other subtypes of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Since the symptoms of Asperger are also similar to the symptoms of PDD-NOS and Autistic Disorder, a qualified team of autism professionals must do further evaluation. This can help determine what subset of Autism Spectrum Disorder the individual has.

A benefit of the ASDS is that it not only provides an overall AS Quotient, but it also gives scores for each of the individual domains on the test. The individual results in the cognitive, language, social, maladaptive, and sensorimotor subscales can assist the professional in determining specific areas of deficit and difficulty in the child. These scores can be especially helpful in treatment planning and determining areas for further testing.

The results of the ADSD also have other non-clinical purposes. They can also be used to help draft goals for the child’s IEP or school intervention plan. The test can also be given annually as a way to measure growth and progress across the different domains in an individual already diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome.

What types of Asperger’s tests are available for adults?

Like previously stated, Asperger syndrome is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by significant impairments in social interaction and stereotyped patterns of behavior. What distinguishes Asperger Syndrome from other Autism Spectrum Disorders is the lack of any significant delay in language or cognitive ability. Asperger Syndrome is not as easy to diagnose as other disorders of the Autism Spectrum, so it is quite common for a person with Asperger to receive the diagnosis as an adult, even though the problems began in childhood. There are several tests and assessments that are designed to determine whether an adult has Asperger Syndrome or one of the other Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The ADI (Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised) is an interview-based assessment that is used to ask questions of a parent, or if the parent is not available, some other person who knew the individual as a child. The questions are designed to determine whether the adult had problems with social interactions as a child, and to rule out other forms of autism. The ADI is effective, but it is limited since the parent may no longer be available, and it takes about three hours to administer.

The AQ (Autism Spectrum Quotient) is a much shorter screening device used to identify adults who may have Asperger Syndrome or Autism. This instrument contains 50 questions that relate to the areas of social skill, attention switching, attention to detail, communication and imagination. The subject responds to each question with “definitely agree,” “slightly agree,” “slightly disagree” and “definitely disagree.” The responses to these questions show the degree to which the subject has features typical of people with Autism or Asperger Syndrome.

Another Asperger screening instrument is the EQ (Empathy Quotient), a 15 item questionnaire used to determine the degree to which an individual cannot understand the feelings and thoughts of others. Though this is a really short assessment that focuses on only one area of development, it has a very strong correlation with the presence of Asperger Syndrome.

As a whole, Asperger’s is a relatively misunderstood type of autism, especially on the Internet. Visit Asperger’s in Adults to read more about Asperger’s Syndrome and high functioning autism.

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Ten Tips On How to Be a Friend to An Autistic Person

People with autism may have a difficult time making friends or being one, for the fact that most of them have limited social skills, which makes it hard for them to relate to others or be a friend. In addition, many have not been taught social and communication skills or how to relate to them. Because of these difficulties that autistic people may experience, the question is, how can you be a friend to them?

* I believe it is imperative that you must be a friend to yourself first. This is accomplished by understanding yourself and nurturing yourself as you grow.

* To be a friend to an autistic person, you want to become strength to him or her. This is done by encouraging the autistic individual, not by putting them down with criticism, which will cause discouragement and low self-esteem.

* Many individuals with autism have difficult behaviors, because of their various levels of the disorder which creates numerous challenges. This may vary according to their age and environment. Be patient with the person with the disorder of autism and let him or her know you do care about them and want to be their friend. Be on common ground with them.

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* It is important for you as parent(s), caregiver(s) to become sensitive to the disorder of autism. Practice companionship. Sometimes it is wise not to talk at times but be silent, listen to what the person is communicating or trying to say. I have learned, there are times when the wrong words or not using the right words can destroy friendships that are in its embryo stage.

* To be a friend to an autistic person, is to try to overlook his or her faults and understand that he or she is overcoming their weaknesses, as you are overcoming yours. Be patient with the person and let him or her know you do care about them and want to be their friend. Be on common ground with them.

* I have learned, not to attempt to change or find fault with people who have the disorder of autism, but make them comfortable with your presence, give them time to get to know you. Be tolerant of these individuals and have an understanding with a forgiving heart.

* Autistic individuals are people who want and need friends just as people who do not have the disorder. They want to belong, feel accepted and loved. They may have difficulties socializing or communicating, but you can discover how to be friends with them and continue to grow with them.

* Another way to be a friend to a person who has autism, find out what their likes and dislikes are. If the person enjoys lunch, take him or her to a restaurant that will be enjoyable. If sports is an enjoyment, take the person to a baseball game or watch it with them in a park or on television. Be creative, find out what the person wants to do, what he or she likes, and enjoy it with them. You can also make new suggestions and create new ideas.

* Send an autistic person a card in the mail with encouraging words on it, or a letter to say you are thinking about the person and you care. This can be done once a week or whenever there is a special occasion or just for fun.

* Bring the individual some treats, home made cookies, or candy. Many autistic children will appreciate balloons, so will adults as a gesture to be friends with the person. Use your imagination, and you will discover that making a friend with a person who has autism will be rewarding.

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Autistic Programs – A Wide Range Of Therapy Programs

Autistic Programs

Sadly, a definitive cure for autism, a disabling neurological disorder, has yet to be found. Affected children can grow up undergoing from speech impairment, difficulties in social interaction, abnormal learning and an inability to enjoy several of life’s experiences that we all take for granted. It has continued demonstrated who early diagnosis and intervention can aide to minimize the situation and therapies can submit the unfortunate patient a assured measure of independence and verify him or her how to cope. Autistic Programs

Numerous options are available within a wide variety of therapy programs. Treatment is very much dependent on an individual’s needs and most professionals agree that it is best started no later than the age of two. Sometimes a combination of treatments and programs will yield the best results, but it should be known that the condition generally requires treatment for the life of the patient and the caregiver should maintain flexibility of approach. Autistic Programs

Generally speaking, treatments and therapy programs can be broken down into four distinct areas – behavioral, supplemental, dietary and medical. Some of these represent established programs, whilst others are experimental and it is important to remember that there are a lot of avenues to explore as the chase for the definitive cure goes on. Behavioral therapies deal with modification techniques, to assist the patient to gain job skills and to enable them to function in their environment. Autistic Programs

For example, Applied Behavior Analysis, or ABA, entails the teaching of skill oriented activities. Patients are rewarded as they learn fun skills and their behavior skills develop. This is a highly structured program, with intensive one-on-one interaction between a child and a therapist. This form of treatment is generally suggested to be the most effective, but many critics think that the approach is somewhat “robotic” and does not encourage the child to be spontaneous in adapting to the real world. Autistic Programs

As opposed to applied behavior analysis, pivotal response therapy is considered to be more natural, taking place in a more relaxed environment, and supporters of this method believe that this approach can trigger a ripple effect to other behaviors, achieving a better all round result. When it comes to supplemental therapies, many people with autism respond favorably to sensory stimulation. Autistic Programs

Patients are encouraged to hold objects with various textures or listen to music, for example. The Tomatis method entails the playing of a loop of music to a child for several hours a day with the goal of improving attention and concentration. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Programs program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Programs is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Teach Autism – The Secrets To Teaching Children With Autism

Teach Autism

Autism is a developmental disorder that can affect anyone. Although genetic ingredients are claimed to be the most powerful sites behind it, there are the majority of other situations that can in fact shoot on the development of autism. Despite the disability involved when one has autism, teaching autistic children is still more than likely using techniques this are sure to work.

One of the most debilitating characteristics of autism is the learning disabilities that come with it. When it comes to teaching children with autism, hard is really an understatement. The whole effort to teach children who have this disorder is definitely going to involve not just a mountain but mountain ranges to conquer. Teach Autism
 
When determining the teaching strategies to use, a teacher can take note of the different symptoms of autism that can impede the natural learning process. Ample knowledge of such symptoms can make the strategy and teaching process effective. There is no assurance that it is going to be easy though.

Here are some of the factors that need attention and thorough consideration to success in the aim of teaching children with autism.

1. Teaching environment. Because of autism, children find it hard to concentrate especially in the presence of loud noises and colors. They get easily distracted by such elements. Therefore, it is a must that the classroom or wherever the teaching process takes place should be kept at its plainest form. It should also be quiet and peaceful enough in order to help keep the children feel the same. Teach Autism

2. Routine activities. Children with autism cannot handle surprises. The daily activities should follow a certain routine. The kids have a good idea of what is going to happen next. This is the only way for them to concentrate and learn.

3. Limited options. When making the children choose something, it is important to keep everything simple. They should not be subjected to a number of choices. It is very easy for them to get all confused over many selections. In the end, they learn nothing and might even feel bad about the whole process. Letting the child pick one over the other is the best way to do it.  Teach Autism

4. Simple communication. Using simple words is the best way to get the points across and completely understood by these young autistic kids. More so, one should maintain a lower voice since loud ones tend to agitate these children. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Teach Autism program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Teach Autism is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Do You Think Your Child May Have Aspergers?

Lots of people have Aspergers syndrome, which is a type of autism that is relatively mild, and many children begin showing symptoms at an early age. Some of the common symptoms of Aspergers can also be present with other disorders, so if you suspect your child has Aspergers syndrome, you should have him or her tested by a child psychologist or other professional. The following are some common Aspergers symptoms you should be aware of.

While kids afflicted with Aspergers syndrome probably have tight relationships with family members, they typically have very few if any friends close to their age. There is a plethora of reasons for this, however a high amount of it is linked to their incapacity to communicate in a way that other people this is regular. A child with Aspergers will seem very shy, aloof or strange to other kids. Communication can also be challenging, as children who are afflicted with Aspergers will at times say things that are improper or maybe shout for no clear reason. From this motive, these kids are habitually broken up and placed in special education classes or in some situations even home schooled, despite them being typically intellectual or even above average. The complexity with socializing is a key syndrome of Aspergers. A symptom of aspergers to keep in mind is sensory input sensitivities such as to light or sound. They may want to avoid bright lights or loud sounds, as well as certain smells or foods. You may find them refusing to eat certain textures or smells. Where many kids won’t react to sounds shapes or odors in their environment a child with aspergers probably will. Especially because the behavior or reaction may be unpredictable it’s important for parents and teachers to learn the triggers. In most cases this can be changed by certain treatments.

Aspergers may also cause kids to have difficult concentrating in school, even if their intelligence is high. These children may have one or more intense interests, and will find it easy to focus on these, but they may have a hard time concentrating on other subjects. Many kids will do better in a subject they like than one they don’t, but the child with Aspergers may do very well in one subject and make no effort at all in another. Children with this condition may get A’s in one subject and F’s in others. Sometimes the child’s teacher may notice that he or she doesn’t follow instructions, even simple ones. This is one symptom of Aspergers, but of course there can be many other reasons children have difficulty with certain subjects in school. The more you are knowledgeable of Aspergers syndrome, the more you’ll be able to collaborate with kids in your life who have this disorder. In this day and age, it’s turning out to be easier to notice and minister to those children and they can more easily lead rather customary lifestyle. If you are guessing that your child is showing signs of Aspergers, the imperative thing is to find out how to communicate effectively with them, so don’t dawdle in looking for the help you might need.
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