Tag Archives: Emotions

Question?: Autistic Angry Outbursts

James asks…

Would it be a huge issue if your autistic child hates receiving discipline as if it were a sensory issue?

Would it be a huge issue if your child with autism had an issue with being disciplined. If a you or someone got angry with him or her, it would cause outbursts and panic as if the child has the ability to have stronger anger than yours or someone whoever gets hard on the child. Even if the child is scared into submission it would make things worse. Would getting angry, frustrated, upset and / or panicky whenever disciplined be a huge issue? It’s discipline which children hate and autistic children tend to hate it more than children. They would hate it so much, it would cause explosive meltdowns. IT would be as if children with autism don’t care who the boss is and would tend to have control over the boss no matter how authoritative.
Does your autistic child have this issue? How big of an issue is it? Do you get frustrated that disciplinary action will make things worse? Does it ruin your marriage having an autistic son with such an issue? Do you feel like your child will never learn?

admin answers:

My autistic child does have this issue to a degree.
I agree with the op that routine is very very much needed.
It does make it more challenging as some autistic children also have sensory issues. My son is hyposensitive (not sensitive enough) to pain and needing lots of pressure.
I’ve even come down to spanking him sometimes to get the point accross. (you know, for safety issues)
It is also difficult because autistic children don’t understand emotions really well. Sometimes I’ll have to tell my son quite clearly, “I am angry’ or I am NOT happy to tell him how I feel.. Or yell.. To communicate those emotions.
Sometimes I feel like my son will never learn, but I know he will .. Eventually. Over time, I have seen what my son used to do, but now doesn’t do a certain behavior anymore.
I wouldn’t say ‘ruin’ is the right word to describe a marriage with a special needs child in the mix. It definitely makes it more stressful, and a little bit more strain on a marriage. Just as you adapt to having a special needs child, you adapt to fit your son/daughter’s needs and adjust the time that is needed to spend on your child.

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Question?: What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder

Richard asks…

Is being in your own little world a part of autism?

I have autism spectrum disorder or aspergers syndrome and I am in my own little world most of the time. It distracts me form my learning I start thinking about star trek or videogames or something else. I wonder is this a part of AS? Because I can be looking at the teacher and daydreaming at the same time and not get the assignment. Are most kids with aspurgers syndrome in there own little worlds? How can I get out of there?

admin answers:

It’s quite common for people with autism spectrum disorders to be in their own world a lot, but not everyone on the autism spectrum is like that and some people who are not on the spectrum are in their own world too.

I think being in our own world a lot can probably be explained at least partly by our environment not being suitable for us. I have Asperger’s syndrome too and I’m in my own world most of the time and I seem to go there when there is either too little or too much stimuli in my environment. I go to my own world in attempt to regulate the stimuli to make it the way I need it to be.

When I was in school I was bored most of the time, because the things we were studying about were too easy for me, so I kept my mind busy by being in my own world a lot, dealing with something more challenging. When I felt lonely and didn’t really have any friends or family to feel close to, I went to my own world to spend time with imaginary, loving friends. At my current working place there is excessive sensory input and I go to my own world a lot to try to block out some of the sensory input and distractions around me. I don’t go to my own world when I’m in a good, suitable environment with an appropriate amount of challenges and sensory experiences and balanced emotions.

I’ve never really attempted to stop being in my own world, because I don’t consider it much of a problem, but I guess that if i wanted to, I’d try to do it by trying to make my environment more suitable somehow, for example by making sure I have something challenging and interesting to do, but a good sensory and emotional environment to do it in.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Mandy asks…

Are some mental illnesses and disorders expressions of evolution at work?

Considering the pathetic state of human civilization, isn’t it safe to say that humans are not currently able to control — or, at least, focalize — their emotions in a practical manner enough to allow for survival? If so, wouldn’t it be painfully logical to accept and value much more those of us who are morally stable but labelled as intense, apathetic, peculiar, odd or asocial? I’m particularly interested in cluster A and B personality disorders along with autism spectrum disorders, seeing as none of them are psychotic or harmful and that they generally don’t perceive their disorders as problematic — only other people do, which is what actually leads to these individuals’ distress in the first place.

Could it be that these conditions are actually further evolutionary steps towards solidifying and maximizing the (conscious and evolutionary recent) frontal cortices’ grip over the impulses of the (unconscious and evolutionary outdated) limbic system?

If so, would it not be important to try shifting society around for the benefit of those who predispose us towards evolutionary progress — to start valuing self-control, intelligence, creativity and independence over mindless conformity?

Philosophically speaking, would it be best, as a society, to cull the weak in order to preserve natural selection or, rather, to begin consciously engineering survival according to our needs?

My own opinion clearly transpires through these questions but I’ll be reading your responses (if any) with as open a mind as possible and let the community decide whichever deserves to be selected as the best answer. Please do share any of your thoughts and reactions as there is no specific question.

Once again, thank you all for your time and inputs.

admin answers:

I’m sure you have an idea of how psychotic we have become. Imagination has spawn us into a labyrinth of false beliefs and this awkward pursuit of happiness. I’m not sure what you mean by focalization of emotions.. Greed and dominance is the evolutionary process and the main direction for our outcome.. Or failure.. Whatever. Big bucks in the woods always want more does; same difference “humans”. If you go back to square one and wipe out all the BS that we’ve developed through this “mental evolution” of civilization as of now.. Getting rid of all the weight. Our primary goal is to survive, hunt, and survive more. Somewhere along the line, someone with an ability to recognize or with “special” features, finally understood and had the ability to teach a simple task and understood the ability for another to learn. These spikes in the evolutionary chain of greatness towards a particular affected region of the brain often open a gateway towards understanding the present.. Much better than those of us who often times forget what the present actually is. Reversing all knowledge and clutter, these spikes are not permanent but over-developments of the so system you mention. Exposure to the special under the correct understanding could open an ability to recognize a greater ability in one’s self.. We just can’t understand it yet and only exposure to those “special” people, hold the key.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Medication

William asks…

Is it possible to stop being autistic?

I still can’t talk, but that isn’t because of autism. I have better eye contact now. I can understand people’s emotions. I don’t have obsessions any more. My anger problems are getting better. I am starting to participate in groups more. I still have anger issues. That is my only problem.
Yes. I am certain I have autism. I have been tested a few times.

admin answers:

You can only go so far. That’s like asking if you are medically depressed (have all the brain malfunctions to cause depression) can I just fix myself to not be depressed and have my brain work with medication and treatment you can come a little ways. But it’s just how you are born. So my answer is yes but not really.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

Helen asks…

Are some mental illnesses and disorders expressions of evolution at work?

Considering the pathetic state of human civilization, isn’t it safe to say that humans are not currently able to control — or, at least, focalize — their emotions in a practical manner enough to allow for survival? If so, wouldn’t it be painfully logical to accept and value much more those of us who are morally stable but labelled as intense, apathetic, peculiar, odd or asocial? I’m particularly interested in cluster A and B personality disorders along with autism spectrum disorders, seeing as none of them are psychotic or harmful and that they generally don’t perceive their disorders as problematic — only other people do, which is what actually leads to these individuals’ distress in the first place.

Could it be that these conditions are actually further evolutionary steps towards solidifying and maximizing the (conscious and evolutionary recent) frontal cortices’ grip over the impulses of the (unconscious and evolutionary outdated) limbic system?

If so, would it not be important to try shifting society around for the benefit of those who predispose us towards evolutionary progress — to start valuing self-control, intelligence, creativity and independence over mindless conformity?

Philosophically speaking, would it be best, as a society, to cull the weak in order to preserve natural selection or, rather, to begin consciously engineering survival according to our needs?

My own opinion clearly transpires through these questions but I’ll be reading your responses (if any) with as open a mind as possible and let the community decide whichever deserves to be selected as the best answer. Please do share any of your thoughts and reactions as there is no specific question.

Once again, thank you all for your time and inputs.
Our civilization is pathetic in the sense that it is destroying the ecosystem, still wages pointless wars, generates unnecessary suffering, populates far beyond the availability of resources and, of course, could very likely end up annihilating itself through nuclear warfare. Although we certainly do have the innate potential to change the status quo and live righteously, we are still currently faring much worse than every single species on Earth.

admin answers:

Well human civilization isn’t really that bad. The point is we are alive and in billions. Whatever we are doing it is working. Evolution doesn’t favor creativity, emotional stability, intelligence, or anything particularly good or bad, evolution only happens for things that are useful, and the easiest to obtain. It’s much easier and *immediately productive to be stronger and faster than it is to be smart.–It may simply be a fact for humans, for example, that minorities, such as blacks, have high crime rates because their minds, which aren’t nearly at the average intelligence and creativity of everybody else, simply see the host civilization, attach themselves to it, and steal/pillage and rape whatever they can get, because it works!! When they are on their own they are starving to death and riddled with disease.—-I personally think humanity should overstep the boundaries of evolution and cultivate our minds for their maximum intelligence.

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Question?: Asperger Syndrome Symptoms

Robert asks…

Can you still be a phyciatrist/phycologist/counciler when you have Asperger Syndrome?

I have a VERY mild form of Asperger Syndrome – but my dream job would be something like a phycologist. Can I still be a phycologist or will I have to look into something else?

admin answers:

Damn, woman – if you only have a mild form of it (like myself) then you can go on to do whatever you want – you’ll just have to work a wee bit harder at it.

In saying that, I suppose it depends on what you symptoms are. I know some folk out there are unable to really decipher others’ emotions/feelings; – doubt that would be very good for being a shrink.

…I got a thumbs down for saying what is true?

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Question?: Schizophrenia

Ruth asks…

Does schizophrenia affect schizophrenics differently? How many types of schizophrenia are there?

Also, how bad does schizophrenia get? Something that always comes to my mind about schizophrenia is the gray matter of a schizophrenics brain. How does “gray matter” affect someone’s intelligence?

admin answers:

Schizophrenia nearly always affects people differently. Currently there are six types of schizophrenia: paranoid, catatonic, undifferentiated, disorganized, residual, and childhood-onset schizophrenia. Each of the different types have a variety of symptoms that occur most often within each type. In a general sense, some people may experience auditory and visual hallucinations but never have disorganized thoughts or speech. Other people may experience catatonic behavior and disorganized speech. Nearly any combination of symptoms is possible and nearly any degree of severity is possible.

People with schizophrenia may go on to lead highly productive and independent lives (not requiring assistance from others. Others may fall on the complete opposite end of the spectrum and always require care from a hospital or residential treatment center. Most people fall in the middle and can maintain somewhat productive lives as long as they have a strong support system of doctors, therapists, family members, and friends.

As for the gray matter, that is a term used to describe the cerebral cortex. The gray matter consists of neuron cell bodies. It controls functions such as muscle control, sensory perceptions, seeing, hearing, memory, emotions, and speech. Therefore, people who have schizophrenia that has damaged the gray matter of the brain tend to have problems in these areas. They are not less intelligent. Instead they may have memory problems, difficulty showing emotions (flat affect), disorganized or jumbled speech, and more severe hallucinations. This is not always true but it does tend to be the pattern. Gray matter becomes more damaged the more psychotic episodes a schizophrenic has. Also, only 25-40% of people with schizophrenia have gray matter damage that can be detected my an MRI scan. This makes it difficult to know if all schizophrenics have gray matter damage or if it is a condition that is not always consistent with the illness.

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Question?: What Is Autism Disorder

William asks…

Are some mental illnesses and disorders expressions of evolution at work?

Considering the pathetic state of human civilization, isn’t it safe to say that humans are not currently able to control — or, at least, focalize — their emotions in a practical manner enough to allow for survival? If so, wouldn’t it be painfully logical to accept and value much more those of us who are morally stable but labelled as intense, apathetic, peculiar, odd or asocial? I’m particularly interested in cluster A and B personality disorders along with autism spectrum disorders, seeing as none of them are psychotic or harmful and that they generally don’t perceive their disorders as problematic — only other people do, which is what actually leads to these individuals’ distress in the first place.

Could it be that these conditions are actually further evolutionary steps towards solidifying and maximizing the (conscious and evolutionary recent) frontal cortices’ grip over the impulses of the (unconscious and evolutionary outdated) limbic system?

If so, would it not be important to try shifting society around for the benefit of those who predispose us towards evolutionary progress — to start valuing self-control, intelligence, creativity and independence over mindless conformity?

Philosophically speaking, would it be best, as a society, to cull the weak in order to preserve natural selection or, rather, to begin consciously engineering survival according to our needs?

My own opinion clearly transpires through these questions but I’ll be reading your responses (if any) with as open a mind as possible and let the community decide whichever deserves to be selected as the best answer. Please do share any of your thoughts and reactions as there is no specific question.

Once again, thank you all for your time and inputs.

admin answers:

A very interesting take. In fact i myself have always wondered and somewhat believe that this may be true but have not yet delved into the subject very deeply. I do however beleive in “indigo children” mental capabilities beyond that of what is accepted to be real and considered by the vast majority to be ‘super-natural powers’. I dont believe that they are super powers but simply the evelution of the humans mind as well. Things like astral projection, telepathy, clairvoyance, recognizing auras, and psychometry seem to the majority of the population to be science fiction when in fact there has been proof (unofficially scientifically of course) that individuals with these enhanced abilities are also lacking in other seemingly normal abilities or have some type of physical ailment the same as when a person loses on of their 5 senses, the other 4 senses are enhanced by just a bit more. A blind man has better hearing than the average human being. Maybe a person with a chronic illness or mental disability has enhanced senses mentally but cannot express them or even cares to express them. Unfortunatley the name now evades me but there is a widely known studier of hypnotism who discovered that people of the same mental states seem to speak in their own patterns that differenciate from other people of another mental state. He copied the pattern that psycopaths speak in and used this as a way to enter the subconscience of any individual. Since we all have the capability speaking and thinking in hese different patters, our minds just choose which one is most comfortable, he could use this pattern of thought on an individual who did not use this pattern to hypnotize them. I believe that the same is true for any person whatever the mental state and that possible evelution is using a somewhat trial and error to see which combination and balance of skills and mental patterns is best useful for survival in constantly changing conditions like that of the planet we live on. I havent thought much more than this myself but maybe you can research these different topics yourself and decide wether or not they are connected to your theory

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Question?: Autism Signs In Older Children

Richard asks…

How did you know your child was Autistic?

Besides being diagnosed by the doctor were there any signs that you noticed? I’m looking for parents who knew around 12 months of age.

admin answers:

I knew my son was autistic by the time he was 12 months old. He was diagnosed at 18 months old by TEACCH ( TEACCH.com ) . We were on the waiting list to be seen by the time he was 12 months old. He has severe autism.

He would not look at me when i called his name.
He would not make eye contact and if you held him in front of your face he would just about roll his eyes up in his head to avoid eye contact.
He didn’t like people. Nobody could touch him but me and that was only because i breastfeed him. I was an object for food, not mama.
He would not play.
He did not talk at all or wave bye bye.
He did not make any of the baby sounds most babies make.
He would flap his hands.
He stood in his playpen for hours and held on to the side and rocked from side to side.
He walked on his tip toes like a ballerina would.
He was a very picky eater.
He would not eat a cheerio that was broken.
He would cover his ears and scream at noises that should not have bothered him.
He never smiled or showed emotions.

These are a few of the weird signs i noticed. He is 22 years old now and there have been so many things he did weird through the years it is hard to remember when he started some of them.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Adults

Mark asks…

Can autistic children lead normal lives as adults?

My 3 y/o cousin was recently diagnosed with autism. He is high functioning, but not enough to be considered Asperger’s. He’s already getting treatment. How likely is it that he will be able to live a normal life as an adult? Like have a job and a family, and his behaviors and delays won’t be as much of a problem?
Lida – Even I know that’s not true. People with autism are PEOPLE, not monsters.

admin answers:

That’s hard to say because it really does depend on how high he is up on the spectrum, but one thing is for sure, it gets better as you get older. I have Asperger’s and now that I’m older no one would ever guess I have it, while when I was a kid I would be freaking out over my shoes not being put on correctly, crying in class, and had almost no friends. But I learned to cope with changes and emotions better and I’m WAY better at talking with people. Everyone is different though, his life may never be totally normal, but that’s not a bad thing, he can still have a fun and interesting life, best thing to do is help him with talking to people and making friends.

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