Tag Archives: Early Adulthood

Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

Mandy asks…

How can you tell if a young man has schizophrenia?

Just wondering – The same young man has depression and AD-HD. He takes special classes.

As he is talking, he’ll look in another direction, as if he is looking at something past you. He stays focus on it and doesn’t make eye contact.
Also, on one occasion I walked in on him talking to him self, facing a wall.
What are some signs of schizophrenia?

admin answers:

It kinda sounds like it could be autism too check out this sight:
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-overview/autism-topic-overview/healthwise–hw152186.html

http://health.yahoo.com/mentalhealth-symptoms/schizophrenia-symptoms/healthwise–aa46973.html

this page has a list of the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia

Symptoms of schizophrenia usually emerge during adolescence or early adulthood and may appear suddenly or develop gradually. When symptoms develop gradually, they may be misdiagnosed with other conditions with similar symptoms, such as bipolar disorder or substance abuse (which commonly occurs with schizophrenia).

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Question?: What Is Autism Yahoo

Susan asks…

I know autism is typically shown as a child but can Autism also first show its signs in adulthood?

It may sound stupid, but are there two types of autism, one that develops in late teens/early adulthood or is just childhood?

admin answers:

If it is environmental as many believe, yes it can present later in life. But, most often the toxins are introduced to those sensitive to them in early childhood. There are not really two types of autism, there are millions, one for every affected person. I’ve yet to see two people who present in the same way with a diagnosis autism.

BTW – It doesn’t sound stupid, but a legitimate question.

Here is a site where lots of people know about autism first hand, not just from psych books. Http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Autism-Mercury/

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Question?: Schizophrenia Types

Joseph asks…

What types of schizophrenia is there?

I found out that this girl that I know is schizophrenic, but she takes pills which make her “normal”. I’ve never noticed anything odd about her except that she’s quiet. I always thought it made people see things or hear voices, which I’m sure I can blame TV for. Is there “minor” cases of schizophrenia, and can it escalate as you age?

admin answers:

Yes, there are minor cases of schizophrenia. It normally does get a little worse as you age, an example of this is younger children can show a couple of symptoms but a diagnosis is normally not made until about age 17+. Though, symptoms do not normally show until late adolescence / early adulthood. Schizophrenia is defined as ‘a mental disorder characterized by abnormalities in the perception or expression of reality’. I always thought of it as not being able to tell the difference between reality and dreams. The types are

Paranoid Schizophrenia:
The defining feature of the paranoid subtype is the presence of auditory hallucinations or prominent delusional thoughts about persecution or conspiracy. However, people with this subtype may be more functional in their ability to work and engage in relationships than people with other subtypes of schizophrenia.

Disorganized Schizophrenia:
As the name implies, this subtype’s predominant feature is disorganization of the thought processes. As a rule, hallucinations and delusions are less pronounced, although there may be some evidence of these symptoms. These people may have significant impairments in their ability to maintain the activities of daily living. Even the more routine tasks, such as dressing, bathing or brushing teeth, can be significantly impaired or lost.
Often, there is impairment in the emotional processes of the individual. For example, these people may appear emotionally unstable, or their emotions may not seem appropriate to the context of the situation. They may fail to show ordinary emotional responses in situations that evoke such responses in healthy people.

Catatonic Schizophrenia:
The predominant clinical features seen in the catatonic subtype involve disturbances in movement. Affected people may exhibit a dramatic reduction in activity, to the point that voluntary movement stops, as in catatonic stupor. Alternatively, activity can dramatically increase, a state known as catatonic excitement.
Other disturbances of movement can be present with this subtype. Actions that appear relatively purposeless but are repetitively performed, also known as stereotypic behavior, may occur, often to the exclusion of involvement in any productive activity.

Residual Schizophrenia:
This subtype is diagnosed when the patient no longer displays prominent symptoms. In such cases, the schizophrenic symptoms generally have lessened in severity. Hallucinations, delusions or idiosyncratic behaviors may still be present, but their manifestations are significantly diminished in comparison to the acute phase of the illness.

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Aspects of quality of life in adults diagnosed with autism in childhood: A population-based study

Aspects of quality of life in adults diagnosed with autism in childhood Sign In to gain access to subscriptions and/or My Tools. sign in icon Sign In | My Tools | Contact Us | HELP SJO banner Search all journals Advanced Search Go Search History Go Browse Journals Go Skip to main page content

Home OnlineFirst All Issues Subscribe RSS rss Email Alerts Search this journal Advanced Journal Search » Aspects of quality of life in adults diagnosed with autism in childhood A population-based study Eva Billstedt

Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, eva.billstedt{at}vgregion.se I. Carina Gillberg
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Christopher Gillberg
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract The present study is a long-term prospective follow-up study of a population-based cohort of 120 individuals diagnosed with autism in childhood, followed into late adolescence/early adulthood. Specific aims of the study were to attempt to measure and study social aspects/quality of life in those 108 individuals with autism alive and available for study at the time of follow-up (13—22 years after original diagnosis). A newly constructed scale for rating ‘autism-friendly environment’/quality of life was used alongside a structured parent/carer interview assessing current occupation, educational history, services provided, accommodation type, and recreational activities. The majority of the group with autism remained dependent on parents/caregivers for support in education, accommodation and occupational situations. In spite of this, the estimation of the study group’s general quality of life was encouragingly positive. Nevertheless, there was an obvious need for improvements in the areas of occupation and recreational activities. Future studies need to look in more depth at the concept of an autism-friendly environment and develop more detailed quality of life assessment tools relevant for people in the autism spectrum.

autism adult outcome quality of life sexuality © The Author(s), 2011. Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

« Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print October 5, 2010, doi: 10.1177/1362361309346066 Autism January 2011 vol. 15 no. 1 7-20 » Abstract Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: current version image indicatorVersion of Record – Feb 2, 2011 1362361309346066v1 – Oct 5, 2010 What’s this? References Services Email this article to a colleague Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Request Permissions Request Reprints Load patientINFORMation Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Billstedt, E. Articles by Gillberg, C. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Billstedt, E. Articles by Gillberg, C. Related Content Load related web page information Share Add to CiteULikeCiteULike Add to ConnoteaConnotea Add to DeliciousDelicious Add to DiggDigg Add to FacebookFacebook Add to Google+Google+ Add to LinkedInLinkedIn Add to MendeleyMendeley Add to RedditReddit Add to StumbleUponStumbleUpon Add to TechnoratiTechnorati Add to TwitterTwitter What’s this?

Current Issue January 2012, 16 (1) Current Issue Alert me to new issues of Autism Submit a ManuscriptSubmit a Manuscript Free Sample CopyFree Sample Copy Email AlertsEmail Alerts Rss FeedsRSS feed More about this journal About the Journal Editorial Board Manuscript Submission Abstracting/Indexing Subscribe Account Manager Recommend to Library Advertising Reprints Permissions society image The National Autistic Society Most Most Read Social StoriesTM to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review Peer interaction patterns among adolescents with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) in mainstream school settings Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy Evidence-Based Practices and Autism Inclusion for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: The first ten years of a community program » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Diagnosis in Autism: A Survey of Over 1200 Patients in the UK The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome Anxiety in High-Functioning Children with Autism The CAST (Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test): Preliminary Development of a UK Screen for Mainstream Primary-School-Age Children Outcome in Adult Life for more Able Individuals with Autism or Asperger Syndrome » View all Most Cited articles HOME ALL ISSUES FEEDBACK SUBSCRIBE RSS rss EMAIL ALERTS HELP Copyright © 2012 by The National Autistic Society, SAGE Publications Print ISSN: 1362-3613 Online ISSN: 1461-7005

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