Tag Archives: Different Ways

Question?: Angry Autistic Kids

Thomas asks…

Need help if my three year old sounds autistic?

Hello I have a three year old, that has recently been tested for autism, but came back inconclusive for a number of reasons i.e. When asking me about my sons communication skills, I didn’t know what they meant by Joint attention or gestures ( I know I’m stupid) so I would say ‘no’ that he doesn’t do those things… even though judging by my son’s speech therapist and the psychologist and developmental ped that assessed him could see that he could do those things. So anyway, my son is going to have a second assessment and when they ask me questions, I want to make sure that I get it right. Here are a list of things that my son does.
1. Uses joint attention…. to much intact.. he would look at me..point.. and look at me to show me a thing he’s interested in i.e. this could be images in a book, showing me he’s drawing… showing em something he’s interested in etc etc.
2. My son has a speech delay
3. My son uses a lot natural gestures ( That I HAVE NOT TAUGHT HIM).. so this could be ” brushing his teeth” would be in gestures, using his fingers, showing his teeth and animating with his finger the motion to brush his teeth…..” wash hands” would be the two of his hands clamped together doing the motion of washing his hands…..” upset’ would be shrugging shoulders would be or folding arms. ” open” would be animating different ways with he’s hands to open with an object.
3. Plays toys appropriately and has good pretend/imaginary play skills i.e. flying helicopter or rocket, cooking, feeding baby etc.. although occasionally he would lie down sideways and build he’s blocks ( which is a concern
4. If he does not get what he wants this would go into a tantrum
5. doesn’t seem to understand patience some of the times *sigh*
6.Flaps arms when angry
7. Plays with kids and knows how to share
8.Has no routine issue whatsoever, but remembers the places which I treat him too e.g. Mcdonalds…toy stores and if we walk past these ” special treat stores” wants to go in *sigh again*
9.Toilet trained.. sleep is fine
10. Can be too hyperactive, running around ( which is tiring)
11. Always wants to play with me ( which can be annoying sometimes) this could be him making me want to out on our 3D glasses and him pointing to the mirror so that we can pull faces… our sleeping game, so he would gesture sleep, and I have to fake sleep and he would diliberalty make noise and I’ll have to wake up and tickle him…. also with games too.
12. Self care needs are advanced
13. Really good at imitating
14. Can be shy
15. seems to understand more, even though speech is limited
16. seems to always want my attention…through crying… wanting me to cuddle him… playing
17. Has a good sense of where I am, e.g say like if I am out of his sight, he would always look back to s where I am or where I have gone too.

I think the main thing for me is his tantrums, he may have an allergy too. Also, he is quite shy and does not show his true self to people.. most of the things have mentioned on this list..only me, his speech therapist, family and close friends have seen this side of him, to strangers he doesn’t open up easily which is sad. Anyway, does my list sound like he has autism and what concerns should I bring up to the psychologist?
@Alicia- Thanks for your comment, when actually listing things which my son does, autism sounds less and I am actually thinking that it could be ADHD..OR ADD.. his dad has said this, that it sounds like ADHD not autism. Although, It can be argued that the fact because he is speech delayed, this adds to frustration..if it is ADHD and not autism, I would be worried that it may result for him to take medication.. which I would not result too. I am aware that ADHD cannot be diagnosed under the age of 5.

admin answers:

Autism is the inability to understand other people as being people with their own wants, needs, and emotions. Something that three-year children also tend to be bad at. Like what has been said before, most of what you are describing sounds a lot like a normal three-year old. The speech doesn’t seem to be important, as your son seems to be able to communicate. Most children learn to talk well because baby talk just gets a “What did you say” response from adults, so children learn to enunciate so as to be understood and get what they want from adults. You’re sons gestures sound like he has found a way of getting out of having to talk properly (if you have ever learned a second language, then you would know how difficult this is). I am curious as to what what would happen if you refused to acknowledge his gestures and insist that he talk more to get what he wants.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms Toddler Boys

Jenny asks…

odd toddler behavior?

my 18 month old girl, does something odd – she sits on the floor and puts her hands on the floor in front of her and rocks front to back. is this abnormal behavior, she is my first girl my other kids are boys and they never did this.

admin answers:

I studied early childhood development in college and sometimes you may see this behavior early on with children that have autism. BUT, don’t get worried right away since autism comes with a lot of other symptoms and behaviors.
As long as she is developing normal on the other milestones for her age (walking, trying to talk, etc…) I wouldn’t be worried about one thing.
Some babies also develop different ways of self soothing, a tiny step into their “independence”.
Keep watching her and take her to the pediatrician if it concerns you anymore.
Happy parenting and best wishes!

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Babies

Chris asks…

What are the first signs of Autism / Developmental Delay that you start to see when they are a baby?

admin answers:

I second everything that Robin wrote. My son was just like that too. He would even break down if someone cleared their throat. Today we use headphones for the auditory. After I taught him to read and write he was able to use a Dynavox which has brought much fewer meltdowns. He is 8 this year and he just pointed for the first time last month. We don’t do any kind of treatments or special diets. We just love and accept him for who he is. Give him patience to learn at his own pace and style even if it means coming up with 50 different ways to teach the same thing until you find one that clicks for him.

I once read a t-shirt that said “Autism isn’t a processing error, it’s a different operating system.” If you can remember that and learn the different system they run you can better understand how they experience the world. My feeling is that autism isn’t a tragedy but an adventure. Simply by experiencing the world differently an autistic person has greater potential to become an innovator. The intense focus that some see as obsessiveness I see as beneficial for reaching a level of expertise in a chosen field. After all a jack of all trades is usually a master of none.

If your child is autistic figure out their triggers and motivators first and the rest will fall into place. Stay positive and best of luck to you.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Medication

Carol asks…

For people whoes work is psycology, are those the people who study things like autism?

Like do they study people with austism behavior and try to find out why?
If not, who do?

admin answers:

Some psychologists do study the behavior and cognition of autistic people, and I think that of all the research you can do on autism, this is the most important. If you can understand the different ways autistic people think, then you can teach them better; and better education means more independence. Nowadays, the education many autistic children receive is substandard, inefficient, coercive, or little better than just a place to go and have someone watch you during the school day. Gifted autistic children have even more trouble–they don’t fit into either the special ed class or the gifted class. Many parents of autistic children have chosen to home-school, and have to learn their particular children’s ways of learning before they can teach anything.

So yes. People are researching it, and it is very important. Learning about cognition and learning in the autistic mind could open doors for a lot of people who have been missing out in school, in college, and in the work world.

Unfortunately, much of the research money is going into autism cause and medications for autism treatment–especially towards genetic testing that would detect autism before birth and allow the option of abortion. Needless to say, this does absolutely nothing to help the autistic people who already exist; nor does it sit very well with autistic people and their families, who would on the whole be much happier if their existence weren’t considered a burden better terminated before it began.

I think we would be a lot better off if we knew more about how autistic people learn. Medication covers up symptoms or just drugs a child into compliance; genetic testing can’t help anybody at all. But if you can properly educate an autistic child, you can remove a lot of obstacles for him to reach his potential. I think we’re missing out on the contributions a lot of people who fell through the cracks of the school system thanks to atypical learning styles.

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How to Bully Proof Your Child With Autism

Does your child have a bully problem? If not, consider yourself lucky that you don’t have a bully to deal with right now but would you and your child be prepared if one should arrive on his or her doorstep tomorrow?

Bullying is difficult for anyone to deal with, regardless of age. All children are targets for bullying but a child on the autism spectrum is especially vulnerable. Due to the fact that the social part of their brain is wired differently, this type of behavior can be very complicated for a child with Autism to understand and deal with. Therefore, they desperately need our guidance in learning how to label bullying behavior and practice in ways to manage it.

Teaching a child with Autism to cope with bullying behavior is imperative in today’s world. Bullies like to target peers that they consider to be weak or passive. Weakness may be determined by physical size but can also be interpreted as someone who is sensitive by nature, has a quiet personality, or seems needy or isolated. Bullies also enjoy taunting a peer who is easily provoked to tears or triggered into a meltdown.

A bully and his or her target are often lacking in social skills but in different ways. Bullies typically know the basics of social skills but for various reasons choose to ignore them and utilize power and force to develop relationships instead. On the other hand, a child with Autism will use appropriate social skills if taught – it’s not that they are intentionally awkward in a social situation or don’t want to make friends – they just don’t know how in many cases.

How do you prepare your child for the negative social interactions she or he may have to deal with?

Studies show that helping your child develop a sense of self-confidence and a mindfulness of body language can help reduce their possibility of being targeted by a bully. You may be doing a lot already to prepare your child for a possible encounter with a bully without knowing it. I invite you to review the following strategies and see if there are any new ideas you can incorporate into your teaching role as parent.

– Help your child be social: Social skills training and teaching your child how to think socially is imperative. Whatever social skills your child is able to acquire will be helpful. At a minimum, knowing what a healthy friendly relationship is like will be a positive asset to many situations. If a child has an accurate sense of what constitutes a friendship he or she will be able to identify and see bullying for what it is right from the start. The sooner one spots a bully the easier it is to deal with.

– Teach assertiveness: Learning how to be appropriately assertive rather than aggressive or passive is one of the best gifts we can give our children. Bullies are counting on their targets to be passive and will not spend time grooming a child who is likely to speak up for her or himself. Teaching your child the word no and how to say it in various forms and ways is crucial. The non-verbal language for assertiveness is just as important and it involves standing straight, using a firm voice and looking someone in the eye – all of which send powerful messages to bullies.

It is a well-known fact that some children with Autism do not like to make eye contact. Try challenging them to determine the ‘color’ of a person’s eyes when talking to them. This a simple distraction technique for an uncomfortable task that will make them appear confident and self-assured.

– Build confidence: Give specific praise each time your autistic child makes an effort to try a new task. “You climbed the ladder by looking at where to put your feet. That’s the safest way to do it!” This gives your child a detailed picture of what she did which makes it easy to replicate for continued success. Hearing that she is climbing the ladder safely and correctly provides her with a feeling of accomplishment that can carry over into other areas.

– Encourage independence: Children who appear capable are less likely to be targeted by individuals who bully others. Bullies actively search for those who are vulnerable, those who seem helpless. Helping our children become as independent as possible is important and we need to be mindful of the tendency to do too much for our children with special needs because it can lead to learned helplessness. Don’t ever hesitate to help your child learn and master a new task if you think they are ready. The feeling of “I can do it” is powerful and will serve as one more layer of protection from the taunts of a bully.

– Address fears: All children have fears that are caused by a number of different sources. Learning to identify and express their fears is crucial to children’s emotional well-being. It is important to give your child language for his fears and various ways to express them such as speaking, signing, drawing, writing or acting them out depending on their abilities. If your child is being bullied you want to make sure he will have the language and the avenue to tell you what is happening in a safe environment.

– Preparation and practice: Whenever time allows, helping your child prepare for new situations will boost their confidence for the real event. New experiences are often difficult for many children with Autism to approach because of their reliance on routine and resistance to change. The first day at preschool or the transition to a new school, can be a worrisome affair to many young children. Because we often fear what is unknown, the more information and practice opportunities we can present to a child, the better the chances will be for success.

Find a social skills curriculum or a book about bullying that will help you and your child practice what to do in the presence of a bully. Bullies are a Pain in the Brain by Trevor Romain takes a humorous approach to bully-proofing yourself and uses lots of pictures which appeal to visual learners.

Also, remember to take the time to discuss bystander behavior with all of your children. One of the most effective interventions for bullying behavior is the response from those who are witnessing it. Bullies often rely on bystanders to help intimidate their target but it can be just as powerful, and often ends the bullying, when a bystander or two supports the child who is being picked on.

Connie Hammer, MSW, parent educator, consultant and coach, guides parents of young children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder to uncover abilities and change possibilities. Visit her website http://www.parentcoachingforautism.com/ to get your FREE resources – a parenting e-course, Parenting a Child with Autism – 3 Secrets to Thrive and a weekly parenting tip newsletter, The Spectrum.

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Loving Someone with Asperger�s Syndrome

Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome
Posted on Wednesday, April 11 @ 15:52:58 EDT by WrongPlanet Tips Loving Someone with Asperger?s SyndromeThe following article is written by Cindy Ariel (PhD), author of Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome.

I wrote Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome for several compelling reasons. Over the years I?ve had the opportunity to work with many people with AS and their partners either as individuals or couples and I have seen the struggles from both sides.

As I looked around for guidance, in the form of books and/or research to help me to help them, I found a serious dearth of information focused on these couples. Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short.

Read about Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome


I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. It can be very difficult to understand the roles and responsibilities of both partners when it often appears that only one is to blame. Taking a serious hard look at ourselves in relation to another can be exceedingly difficult, but I attempt to help couples gain balance and move closer to each other in this regard.

While it?s true that having Asperger?s syndrome versus not having it result in two people with different ways of thinking and even of being, we do not have to be at such intense odds with each other. Both partners in any couple need to feel heard and both need to listen to the other with an open heart, if not an open mind.

If we listen to each other with our hearts, and use our heads to make important decisions we should be able to come up with a loving relationship that feels mutually satisfying and leads to a happy union. Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome: Understanding and Connecting with Your Partner was written to help partners in which one person has AS and one doesn?t along their journey to a fulfilling life together.

You can order Loving Someone with Asperger’s Syndrome on Amazon.

Editorial disclosure: While this column is not sponsored or paid for in any way, a separate ad for this book has been placed on Wrong Planet by the author.
               
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why do you write this book with an assumption about a negative aspect within a relationship or one where 2 people are in conflict as if they have to “get over” something to be a good couple?
I like this approach: Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short. I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. I guess the book is targeted at people who are indeed facing problems in their relationship. If it wasn’t about conflicts within the relationship, it would have been a different book. The only thing that may be a bit unfortunate in my opinion, is the title: “Loving someone with Asperger’s syndrome”, because that title is written from the perspective of the non-autistic partner, and it may seem that it’s not aimed at the autistic partner. While the piece I quoted above in italics claims that the book tries to go against that clich?.
Sorry, I failed to integrate italics and paragraphs into my previous post. Not sure why it didn’t work, as the preview showed exactly how I intended it to be.
Re: Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome (Score: 1)
by TommyTomorrow Friday, April 27 @ 14:03:40 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) Both myself and my fiancee have AS. Anyone know if this book would be useful?
Re: Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome (Score: 1)
by anotherjared Sunday, May 13 @ 17:51:06 EDT
(User Info | Send a Message) It’s a nice sentiment, I have to re-iterate an earlier comment about how to support a couple where both are aspie’s. I’d much rather see Cindy Ariel (PhD) actively contributing to wrongplanet.net for the community of wrongplanet.net and not using the site to advertise her book… I’m not here to see sales pitches, I’m here for actual advice and discussion. Just me though.

View the original article here

Loving Someone with Asperger�s Syndrome

Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome
Posted on Wednesday, April 11 @ 15:52:58 EDT by WrongPlanet Tips Loving Someone with Asperger?s SyndromeThe following article is written by Cindy Ariel (PhD), author of Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome.

I wrote Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome for several compelling reasons. Over the years I?ve had the opportunity to work with many people with AS and their partners either as individuals or couples and I have seen the struggles from both sides.

As I looked around for guidance, in the form of books and/or research to help me to help them, I found a serious dearth of information focused on these couples. Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short.

Read about Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome


I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. It can be very difficult to understand the roles and responsibilities of both partners when it often appears that only one is to blame. Taking a serious hard look at ourselves in relation to another can be exceedingly difficult, but I attempt to help couples gain balance and move closer to each other in this regard.

While it?s true that having Asperger?s syndrome versus not having it result in two people with different ways of thinking and even of being, we do not have to be at such intense odds with each other. Both partners in any couple need to feel heard and both need to listen to the other with an open heart, if not an open mind.

If we listen to each other with our hearts, and use our heads to make important decisions we should be able to come up with a loving relationship that feels mutually satisfying and leads to a happy union. Loving Someone with Asperger?s Syndrome: Understanding and Connecting with Your Partner was written to help partners in which one person has AS and one doesn?t along their journey to a fulfilling life together.

You can order Loving Someone with Asperger’s Syndrome on Amazon.

Editorial disclosure: While this column is not sponsored or paid for in any way, a separate ad for this book has been placed on Wrong Planet by the author.
               
The comments are owned by the poster. We aren’t responsible for their content.
No Comments Allowed for Anonymous, please register

why do you write this book with an assumption about a negative aspect within a relationship or one where 2 people are in conflict as if they have to “get over” something to be a good couple?
I like this approach: Much of the writing seems almost to take one side or the other as if we are talking about two different teams or sometimes even enemies rather than two people who love each other and are trying everything they can to connect, yet coming up short. I try to come at these relationships with a balanced view, looking at responsibility on both sides and suggesting understanding toward and compromise from both partners. I guess the book is targeted at people who are indeed facing problems in their relationship. If it wasn’t about conflicts within the relationship, it would have been a different book. The only thing that may be a bit unfortunate in my opinion, is the title: “Loving someone with Asperger’s syndrome”, because that title is written from the perspective of the non-autistic partner, and it may seem that it’s not aimed at the autistic partner. While the piece I quoted above in italics claims that the book tries to go against that clich?.
Sorry, I failed to integrate italics and paragraphs into my previous post. Not sure why it didn’t work, as the preview showed exactly how I intended it to be.

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Some Important Facts Of Autism

The interaction and community skills of the person is affected life long by this disease. Comparing with other children the children with autism behave differently. Mostly the children have problem in speaking, as a result the child is not able to express his feelings in proper words.

The parent of an autistic child could understand this easily, rather than the people to know the real fact. Reality is unknown for them. So some important things that will give them a clear understanding is given here.

There are many theories which gives the possible cause of autism. Some think this is caused by the mercury which are in the vaccines given to infants. Whilst few states that it is due to parent’s age. But the more appropriate theory is that autism is because of genetic and environmental factors.

Autism is also called as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Because few are non-verbal and mentally retarded whilst few are verbal and bright. There are varied range of symptoms in different children with autism. Social communication is the main symptom seen in most of the patients. They fail to maintain good eye contact, converse properly with others, or have one’s perspective etc.

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Autism and Asperger Syndrome have some similarities. Both cases have problems which are mostly common. In Autism, child’s speech is delayed while in Asperger Syndrome the speech develops at appropriate age and time. In other words, the child with Asperger Syndrome is verbal and bright.

It is a common fact that every individual is different from another. Similarly, each autism child differs from other. Some may speak well while other may be silent. Some may be affected physically with GIT problems, sensory problems, difficulty in sleep, etc, whereas some have problem in social communication. Even if the disease is the same, the symptoms they have varies in each individual.

Yet autism remains without proper cure though the medical field has great advancement. Though there a different ways by which their skills can be improved they still cannot remain as normal children. Some treatments for autism are behavioral, biomedical, sensory, developmental or even arts-based. Depending upon the child, certain treatments will be more successful than others.

It is a common fact that autism is a life long disease. The symptoms may become mild with proper timely interventions. Without depending others, they can try to do their activities of daily living. The communication skill can also be increased.

If one gets autism, the whole family seems to be in a stressed situation. They have to withstand many adverse conditions. So at this time, the support of relatives and friends is important. By this way they can overcome this situation. By this they can be motivated to overcome this disease.
Also gather more details on autism symptoms and causes of autism.
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Autism What is it

So Autism what is it?….

Autism is a developmental disability of the brain; autism is not a form of mental retardation.

The word autism can refer to several similar disabilities, like Autistic Disorder, Aspergers Syndrome, also Atypical Autism (a type of Pervasive Developmental Disorder, not otherwise specified) etc.. There are differences between these conditions, but on the whole they are quite similar.

The word ‘spectrum’ is used because, while all people with autism share three main areas of difficulty, their condition will affect them in very different ways. Some are able to live relatively ‘everyday’ lives; others will require a lifetime of specialist support.

There are three main areas of difficulty which all people with autism share these are referred to as the ‘triad of impairments’. They are:

“Difficulties with communication”;  “Difficulties with social interaction”;   “Difficulties with imagination”. Some autistic people may be affected more by one symptom, while others may be affected more strongly by a different symptom.

People with autism may experience some form of sensory sensitivity. This can occur in one or more of the five senses – sight, sound, smell, touch and taste. A person’s senses are either intensified (hypersensitive) or under-sensitive (hypo-sensitive).

For example, a person with autism may find certain background sounds, like the hum of a fridge for example unbearably loud or distracting, while the rest of us can ignore or block out the noise. To an autistic person the noise can cause anxiety or even physical pain, this can be referred to as an autism anxiety trigger.

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People who are hypo-sensitive will often not feel pain or extremes of temperature. Some may rock, spin or flap their hands to stimulate sensation, this is called autistic stimming. An autistic person will use stimming to help with balance and posture or to deal with stress, another autism anxiety trigger

People with sensory sensitivity may also find it harder to use their body awareness system. Which tells us where our bodies are, so for those with reduced body awareness, it can be harder to navigate rooms without walking into objects or bumping into others. They will not appreciate what is an appropriate distance from other people to stand.

This can cause social problems, as the person will be unaware of the need for personal space and may stand very close, making people feel very uncomfortable.

They may also have problems with ‘fine motor’ tasks such as tying shoelaces, or fastening buttons…

Sometime autistic people may have learning disabilities, which can affect all aspects of their life, from going to school, to learning how to wash themselves, clean their teeth, Or how to feed themselves.

The symptoms of autism will vary from person to person each autistic person will have a different degree of learning disability.

Some autistic people will be able to live fairly independently, but may need some support.

While others may require lifelong, specialist support. However, all people with autism can, and do, learn and develop with the right sort of support and resources.

One such form of autism resources is something called autism social stories…These are short pieces of text with appropriate pictures-giving your autistic child, teen or adult specific social cues for everyday living skills.

Like how to wash their teeth, visiting the doctor, eating out. Social skills stories for autistic children and teens, or adults can be printed and used as instructions for all of life’s “normal” and “not so normal” life experiences and actions.

They can be like a best friend to an autistic person helping them feel better in, and cope with, situations they may struggle to understand or deal with – by giving them clear and accurate information about those situations.

Autism social stories are an excellent resource tool which can become a valuable part of an autistic person’s life.

To obtain these valuable autism resources, please visit us at www.autismsocialstories.com
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Autistic Siblings – How To Help Your Non Autistic Kids Cope

Finding out one of your children is autistic can change the whole dynamic of the household. Not only are the parents and the child effected, but so are the other children in the home. Coping with this problem can be difficult because no one knows what to expect. There are ways to make the transition easier. Keeping the lines of communication is one of the most important. However, you have to know what to expect.

There are different ways this situation can go. Your other children can feel neglected because you are giving your autistic child more attention. They may feel left out and lonely. Unfortunately, children are mean and their friends can make fun of them for having an autistic brother or sister. It’s important to give your other children attention and talk to them about their feelings. Don’t be shy to ask your other children how they feel about the situation. They might have some interesting takes or ideas on your autistic child and may be able to contribute to their care.

If your child is feeling neglected, try to set up time where the two of you can spend time together. Go to the movies, grab a bite to eat or just go to the park. Spending time with your child will go a long way in helping the transition in the household. Also, explain to your other children what is going on with your child that has been diagnosed with autism. By understanding what is going on they may feel better about it.

Your normal child might take this opportunity as a way to mature. Seeing the family in need, he or she could have a different reaction than feeling neglected. Your child will want to help out, teaching your autistic child, helping with everyday tasks and using this opportunity as a chance to grow. Your other children might develop a strong bond with the autistic child and want to protect them.

Having an autistic child in the house is a learning lesson to the rest of the family. It will teach them to be tolerant of people with differences. By living with someone who developmental skills, they can be more accepting of classmates and others who are different. Use this as a learning experience for the whole family.

One thing you want to try is having a family night where everyone in the house gets together. Perhaps this is one night of the week where the entire family meets for dinner or has a movie night. Any way you do it this is a great way to get everyone together and share each other’s day. Talking to your family members and keeping the lines of communication open is important to any environment. Make sure to keep your other children’s feelings in perspective.

Abhishek has got some great Autism Treatment Secrets up his sleeves! Download his FREE 41 Pages Ebook, “Understanding And Treating Autism” from his website http://www.Health-Whiz.com/555/index.htm . Only limited Free Copies available.
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