Tag Archives: Developmental Delay

Question?: Treatment For Autism In Babies

Chris asks…

What are the first signs of Autism / Developmental Delay that you start to see when they are a baby?

admin answers:

I second everything that Robin wrote. My son was just like that too. He would even break down if someone cleared their throat. Today we use headphones for the auditory. After I taught him to read and write he was able to use a Dynavox which has brought much fewer meltdowns. He is 8 this year and he just pointed for the first time last month. We don’t do any kind of treatments or special diets. We just love and accept him for who he is. Give him patience to learn at his own pace and style even if it means coming up with 50 different ways to teach the same thing until you find one that clicks for him.

I once read a t-shirt that said “Autism isn’t a processing error, it’s a different operating system.” If you can remember that and learn the different system they run you can better understand how they experience the world. My feeling is that autism isn’t a tragedy but an adventure. Simply by experiencing the world differently an autistic person has greater potential to become an innovator. The intense focus that some see as obsessiveness I see as beneficial for reaching a level of expertise in a chosen field. After all a jack of all trades is usually a master of none.

If your child is autistic figure out their triggers and motivators first and the rest will fall into place. Stay positive and best of luck to you.

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Question?: What Is Autism

Joseph asks…

How does autism affect the development of a three year old boy ?

im doing a childcare project on a child with autism .
i was wondering if anyone can tell me how it could be affecting his mental development

i haven’t found much useful Information on the net .

if you know of any websites that might help i would appreciate it

THANKS!

admin answers:

My twins are autistic and from a very early age they showed developmental delay however we at first put it down to them being born early as this can sometimes stunt development. They were over a year old before they could sit up by themselves and over 2 before they could walk. They are 5 now and still have limited language, this is due to them being locked away in their own little world, where any change or taking them out of schedule can cause severe confusion and upset, I give you an example today we went into the town and they presumed we were going round the shops as we normally would but as soon as we walked past the centre they realised this wasn’t their routine and dropped their legs and refused to walk. They say the confusion caused by autism is equal to you standing in a crowded room full of loudly shouting people and asked to concentrate on writing on a wall that would cause anyone to be uncomfortable let alone a child. Autistic children generally avoid eye contact usually the reason for speech delay. They can also resort to aggressive behaviour as my twins do they spent 2 years of their life banging their heads off hard surfaces -its very scary if you try to restrain them they don’t understand why and do it harder. They don’t do it as often now as they can understand me a bit better and visa versa but if they become uncomfortable they can still kick off and more often than not any object within their vicinity will get launched. When the boys were three they had no clear language (due to lack of eye contact) this caused frustration because if they wanted something they couldn’t tell me and id have to spend the next 30 mins trying to stop them headbanging and trying different things like drinks snacks changing the tv channel etc quite often they would forget why they kicked off in the first place but couldn’t calm themselves down because they were so wound up. Autistic children due to being shut in their own world generally are solitary and do not like their play to be interrupted, my oldest twin will hide under his bed with his trains and line them up in an exact straight line if any of them were to be moved all hell will break lose. He loves order and its through this tendency that we have been able to bring on his development, we use symbols with him so he knows exactly what is going to happen throughout the day and most of the time we stick to it and he knows whats coming next, he generally knows by where we are- what we are then going to be doing its only on rare occasions like this morning when we had to go somewhere unexpected that his perfect balance of routine is disrupted, one of the main important things for autistic children is routine and keeping language very simple making it easier for them to understand the world around them and also not pushing them to do things just because other kids their age are doing them. My twins are 5 and still in nappies they do not understand toiletry needs and often people say to me ( much to my annoyance) are they not out of nappies yet. But they have no idea that if i asked them to sit on the toilet or potty with their trousers down id end up with a 3 hour screaming match on my hands they will get there it might not be this year or next but when they understand it will come. A year ago they couldn’t even ask me for a drink now they know to come and ask me using the word drink i will then say go and get one and they help themselves i never thought id be able to leave my fridge unlocked as the would just be helping themselves left right and centre but the are slowly and surely learning acceptable behaviour. One thing i noticed with my twins from as early as a year they wont try anything new until they are 100% sure about it, pushing them to do new things just causes confusion and upset, with autistic children it will come when it comes

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Question?: Pdd-nos

Ken asks…

Schools for learning disability for children in Baltimore?

I need the names of a few schools that can assist a child of about 7 years of age who is suffering from PDD-NOS (it’s similar to autism, but isn’t the same) in Baltimore, Maryland.

I don’t prefer a website with a list, as I have been getting them again and again already.

Please help. Contact information about a person who is knowledgeable about all this would be helpful as well.

Thank you.

admin answers:

Call your local public school system. Ask to speak with offices of Special Education. Tell them you are a new parent with a child with a developmental delay.

Can you tell me if your school system has any programs that work with students with PDD-NOS.

Also, would you know of any other private schools in the area for students with disabilities?

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Causes

Michael asks…

what is some current research for rett syndrome?

i’m writing it in my brochure and i can’t find it anywhere!

admin answers:

Here are some great facts! Brochures are great when they are loaded with lots of facts and graphics. Use some of these:

Rett syndrome is a unique developmental disorder that is first recognized in infancy and seen almost always in girls, but can be rarely seen in boys.

Rett syndrome has been most often misdiagnosed as autism, cerebral palsy, or non-specific developmental delay

Rett syndrome is caused by mutations on the X chromosome on a gene called MECP2. There are more than 200 different mutations found on the MECP2 gene. Most of these mutations are found in eight different “hot spots.”

Rett syndrome strikes all racial and ethnic groups, and occurs worldwide in 1 of every 10,000 to 23,000 female births.

Rett syndrome is a developmental disorder. It is not a degenerative disorder.

Rett syndrome causes problems in brain function that are responsible for cognitive, sensory, emotional, motor and autonomic function. These can include learning, speech, sensory sensations, mood, movement, breathing, cardiac function, and even chewing, swallowing, and digestion.

Rett syndrome symptoms appear after an early period of apparently normal or near normal development until six to eighteen months of life, when there is a slowing down or stagnation of skills. A period of regression then follows when she loses communication skills and purposeful use of her hands. Soon, stereotyped hand movements such as handwashing, gait disturbances, and slowing of the normal rate of head growth become apparent. Other problems may include seizures and disorganized breathing patterns while she is awake. In the early years, there may be a period of isolation or withdrawal when she is irritable and cries inconsolably. Over time, motor problems may increase, but in general, irritability lessens and eye contact and communication improve.

Rett syndrome is confirmed with a simple blood test to identify the MECP2 mutation. However, since the MECP2 mutation is also seen in other disorders, the presence of the MECP2 mutation in itself is not enough for the diagnosis of Rett syndrome. Diagnosis requires either the presence of the mutation (a molecular diagnosis) or fulfillment of the diagnostic criteria (a clinical diagnosis, based on signs and symptoms that you can observe) or both.

Rett syndrome can present with a wide range of disability ranging from mild to severe. The course and severity of Rett syndrome is determined by the location, type and severity of her mutation and X-inactivation. Therefore, two girls of the same age with the same mutation can appear quite different.

Rett syndrome presents many challenges, but with love, therapy and assistance, those with the syndrome can benefit from school and community activities well into middle age and beyond. They experience a full range of emotions and show their engaging personalities as they take part in social, educational, and recreational activities at home and in the community.

Good luck in your work! 🙂

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Routine Developmental Screening Essential To Identify Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay, Autism

Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 30 Aug 2012 – 1:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Routine Developmental Screening Essential To Identify Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay, Autism
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Hispanic children often have undiagnosed developmental delays and large numbers of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic children who first were thought to have developmental delay actually had autism, researchers affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found.

The study, one of the largest to date to compare development in Hispanic and non-Hispanic children, is published in the journal Autism. The results lead the study authors to recommend increased public health efforts to improve awareness, especially among Hispanics, about the indicators of developmental delay and autism.

“Our study raises concerns about access to accurate, culturally relevant information regarding developmental milestones and the importance of early detection and treatment,” said Virginia Chaidez, the lead author and a postdoctoral researcher in the UC Davis Department of Public Health Sciences when the study was conducted. “Autism and developmental delay tend to go undiagnosed when parents are not aware of the signs to look for, and the conditions are often misdiagnosed when parents don’t have access to adequate developmental surveillance and screening.”

Developmental delay is diagnosed in children who lag behind others in reaching important mental or physical milestones, while autism is characterized by deficits in social interactions and communication behaviors. The symptoms of both disorders can be improved with targeted interventions, with the greatest improvements seen when interventions begin early in life.

In conducting the study, the researchers used data from the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) Study, a population-based study of factors that increase risk for autism or developmental delay. The current study included 1,061 children living in California who were between 24 and 60 months of age. They were divided into three groups: children with autism, children with developmental delay but not autism, and children with typical development. All diagnoses were confirmed or changed based on evaluations by MIND Institute clinicians.

The evaluations of Hispanic children were conducted by bicultural and bilingual clinicians in Spanish or English, depending on the primary language used at home. The results for children with at least one Hispanic parent of any race were compared to the results for children of non-Hispanic white parents.

“Our goal was to use the CHARGE Study to help fill the gaps in research on autism for Hispanics so we can better understand what autism is like for this growing U.S. population,” said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, professor of public health sciences, researcher with the UC Davis MIND Institute and principal investigator of CHARGE. “No other study of autism has included such a large proportion of Hispanic children.”

When the outcomes for Hispanic children were compared to non-Hispanic children, the results revealed more similarities than differences in terms of autism profiles, including diagnostic scores, language function, whether or not children lost acquired skills and overall intellectual, social and physical functioning.

A striking outcome, however, was that 6.3 percent of Hispanic children enrolled in the study who were selected randomly out of the general population met criteria for developmental delay, compared with only 2.4 percent of non-Hispanic participants, which is the expected percentage. This raised concerns among the researchers that many Hispanic children with developmental delays may not be getting the services they need.

For both Hispanic and non-Hispanic children, there was a high percentage (about 19 percent overall) of Hispanic and non-Hispanic children recruited for the study with developmental delay who actually met criteria for autism, raising concerns about adequate access to accurate developmental assessment.

When the analysis was restricted to bilingual children, a significant relationship also emerged between secondary language exposure (when a child was spoken to 25 to 50 percent of the time in a language other than English) and lower scores on standardized tests of receptive and expressive language. This resulted in lower overall cognitive scores for this group.

“Our results emphasize the importance of considering cultural and other family factors such as multiple language exposure that can affect development when interpreting clinical tests, even when they are conducted in the child’s preferred language,” said Robin Hansen, chief of developmental-behavioral pediatrics at UC Davis, director of clinical programs with the MIND Institute and a study co-author.

Hansen, the MIND Institute clinical team and the Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at the MIND Institute have worked hard to provide accurate, current and evidence-based information about developmental disabilities to parents, educators, therapists and health-care specialists through an annual conference, website resources and community outreach.

“That so many children are slipping through the cracks is disheartening,” Hansen said. “The differences between developmental disabilities can be subtle but important and involve distinct treatment pathways. We need to make sure that all children are getting routine developmental screening, early diagnosis and intervention so they can achieve their fullest potential.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study, titled “Autism spectrum disorders in Hispanics and non-Hispanics,” is available at http://aut.sagepub.com/content/16/4/381. The research was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (grants R01-ES015359 and P01-ES11269), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s STAR program (grants R-829388 and R-833292) and the UC Davis MIND Institute.
University of California – Davis Health System Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Routine Developmental Screening Essential To Identify Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay, Autism.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 30 Aug. 2012. Web.
30 Aug. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Routine Developmental Screening Essential To Identify Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay, Autism’

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View the original article here

Diagnosis Often Missed For Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 29 Aug 2012 – 2:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Diagnosis Often Missed For Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay
not yet ratednot yet rated
Broader outreach on developmental milestones needed

Hispanic children often have undiagnosed developmental delays and large numbers of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic children who first were thought to have developmental delay actually had autism, researchers affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found.

The study, one of the largest to date to compare development in Hispanic and non-Hispanic children, is published in the journal Autism. The results lead the study authors to recommend increased public health efforts to improve awareness, especially among Hispanics, about the indicators of developmental delay and autism.

“Our study raises concerns about access to accurate, culturally relevant information regarding developmental milestones and the importance of early detection and treatment,” said Virginia Chaidez, the lead author and a postdoctoral researcher in the UC Davis Department of Public Health Sciences when the study was conducted. “Autism and developmental delay tend to go undiagnosed when parents are not aware of the signs to look for, and the conditions are often misdiagnosed when parents don’t have access to adequate developmental surveillance and screening.”

Developmental delay is diagnosed in children who lag behind others in reaching important mental or physical milestones, while autism is characterized by deficits in social interactions and communication behaviors. The symptoms of both disorders can be improved with targeted interventions, with the greatest improvements seen when interventions begin early in life.

In conducting the study, the researchers used data from the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) Study, a population-based study of factors that increase risk for autism or developmental delay. The current study included 1,061 children living in California who were between 24 and 60 months of age. They were divided into three groups: children with autism, children with developmental delay but not autism, and children with typical development. All diagnoses were confirmed or changed based on evaluations by MIND Institute clinicians.

The evaluations of Hispanic children were conducted by bicultural and bilingual clinicians in Spanish or English, depending on the primary language used at home. The results for children with at least one Hispanic parent of any race were compared to the results for children of non-Hispanic white parents.

“Our goal was to use the CHARGE Study to help fill the gaps in research on autism for Hispanics so we can better understand what autism is like for this growing U.S. population,” said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, professor of public health sciences, researcher with the UC Davis MIND Institute and principal investigator of CHARGE. “No other study of autism has included such a large proportion of Hispanic children.”

When the outcomes for Hispanic children were compared to non-Hispanic children, the results revealed more similarities than differences in terms of autism profiles, including diagnostic scores, language function, whether or not children lost acquired skills and overall intellectual, social and physical functioning.

A striking outcome, however, was that 6.3 percent of Hispanic children enrolled in the study who were selected randomly out of the general population met criteria for developmental delay, compared with only 2.4 percent of non-Hispanic participants, which is the expected percentage. This raised concerns among the researchers that many Hispanic children with developmental delays may not be getting the services they need.

For both Hispanic and non-Hispanic children, there was a high percentage (about 19 percent overall) of Hispanic and non-Hispanic children recruited for the study with developmental delay who actually met criteria for autism, raising concerns about adequate access to accurate developmental assessment.

When the analysis was restricted to bilingual children, a significant relationship also emerged between secondary language exposure (when a child was spoken to 25 to 50 percent of the time in a language other than English) and lower scores on standardized tests of receptive and expressive language. This resulted in lower overall cognitive scores for this group.

“Our results emphasize the importance of considering cultural and other family factors such as multiple language exposure that can affect development when interpreting clinical tests, even when they are conducted in the child’s preferred language,” said Robin Hansen, chief of developmental-behavioral pediatrics at UC Davis, director of clinical programs with the MIND Institute and a study co-author.

Hansen, the MIND Institute clinical team and the Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at the MIND Institute have worked hard to provide accurate, current and evidence-based information about developmental disabilities to parents, educators, therapists and health-care specialists through an annual conference, website resources and community outreach.

“That so many children are slipping through the cracks is disheartening,” Hansen said. “The differences between developmental disabilities can be subtle but important and involve distinct treatment pathways. We need to make sure that all children are getting routine developmental screening, early diagnosis and intervention so they can achieve their fullest potential.”

For information on developmental milestones, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Learn the Signs” website , which is available in English and Spanish at. Parents with concerns about their child’s development should work with their health-care provider, school district and California Department of Developmental Services regional center to identify appropriate services.

The research was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (grants R01-ES015359 and P01-ES11269), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s STAR program (grants R-829388 and R-833292) and the UC Davis MIND Institute.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. “Autism spectrum disorders in Hispanics and non-Hispanics”, Virginia Chaidez et al.
Autism March 7, 2012, doi: 10.1177/1362361311434787

Source: UC Davis MIND Institute

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

n.p. “Diagnosis Often Missed For Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 29 Aug. 2012. Web.
29 Aug. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Diagnosis Often Missed For Hispanic Children With Developmental Delay’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Early intervention services

Early intervention services

Childhood intervention programs for the disadvantaged focus on the benefits that accrue to the children. Programs may influence the parents (typically the mother), as most programs provide services to the mother as well as the child.

To be eligible for services, children must be less than 3 years of age and have a confirmed disability or established developmental delay, as determined by the state, in one or more of the following areas of development: physical, cognitive, communication, social-emotional, and/or adaptive.

Autism Treatment and Intervention

The Early Intervention Program offers a rich variety of therapeutic and support services to eligible infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families, including:

• family education and counseling, home visits, and parent support groups
• special instruction
• speech pathology and audiology
• occupational therapy
• physical therapy
• psychological services
• service coordination
• nursing services
• nutrition services
• social work services
• vision services
• assistive technology devices and services

Early intervention applies to children of school age or younger who are discovered to have or are at risk of developing a handicapping condition or other special need that may affect their development. Early intervention consists of the provision of services to such children and their families for the purpose of lessening the effects of the condition. Early intervention can be remedial or preventive in nature – remediating existing developmental problems or preventing their occurrence.

Early intervention may focus on the child alone or on the child and the family together.

Early intervention programs may be center-based, home-based, hospital-based, or a combination. Services range from identification – that is, hospital or school screening and referral services – to diagnostic and direct intervention programs. Early intervention may begin at any time between birth and school age; however, there are many reasons for it to begin as early as possible.

Tagged as: Early intervention services

View the original article here

Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles The Risk Of Autism Or Developmental Delay

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses;  Pregnancy / Obstetrics;  Flu / Cold / SARS
Article Date: 25 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT Current ratings for:
‘Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles The Risk Of Autism Or Developmental Delay’
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A team of UC Davis researchers has found that mothers who had fevers during their pregnancies were more than twice as likely to have a child with autism or developmental delay than were mothers of typically developing children, and that taking medication to treat fever countered its effect.

“Our study provides strong evidence that controlling fevers while pregnant may be effective in modifying the risk of having a child with autism or developmental delay,” said Ousseny Zerbo, lead author of the study, who was a Ph.D. candidate with UC Davis when the study was conducted and is now a postdoctoral researcher with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research. “We recommend that pregnant women who develop fever take anti-pyretic medications and seek medical attention if their fever persists.”

Published online in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, the study is believed to be the first to consider how fever from any cause, including the flu, and its treatment during pregnancy could affect the likelihood of having a child with autism or developmental delay.

The results are based on data from a large, case-control investigation known as the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) Study. Another recent study based on CHARGE data found that mothers who were obese or diabetic had a higher likelihood of having children with autism.

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, a professor of public health sciences at UC Davis and principal investigator of CHARGE, pointed out that fever is produced by acute inflammation – the short-term, natural immune system reaction to infection or injury – and that chronic inflammation, which no longer serves a beneficial purpose and can damage healthy tissue, may be present in mothers with metabolic abnormalities like diabetes and obesity.

“Since an inflammatory state in the body accompanies obesity and diabetes as well as fever,” said Hertz-Picciotto, “the natural question is: Could inflammatory factors play a role in autism?”

She explained that when people are infected by bacteria or viruses, the body generally reacts by mounting a healing response that involves the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from white blood cells into the bloodstream. Some cytokines are able to cross the placenta, and therefore could reach the fetal central nervous system, potentially altering levels of neurotransmitters and brain development.

“We definitely think more research is necessary to pinpoint the ways that inflammation could alter brain development,” said Hertz-Picciotto.

CHARGE includes an ethnically diverse population of children aged 2 to 5 years born in California and living in Northern California. The current study included 538 children with autism, 163 children with developmental delay but not autism, and 421 typically developing children whose mothers answered standardized questionnaires about whether they had the flu and/or fever during pregnancy and if they took medications to treat their illnesses.

The results showed that flu during pregnancy was not associated with greater risks of having a child with autism or developmental delay. Fever from any cause during pregnancy, however, was far more likely to be reported by mothers of children with autism (2.12 times higher odds) or developmental delay (2.5 times higher odds), as compared with mothers of children who were developing typically. For children of mothers who took anti-fever medication, the risk of autism was not different from the risk in children whose mothers reported no fever.

According to Irva Hertz-Picciotto, results based on CHARGE data are noteworthy because of the study’s large population-based sample and detailed information on participants. Other CHARGE evaluations have found that taking prenatal vitamins prior to and during the first month of pregnancy may help prevent autism and that living near a freeway or in areas with high regional air pollution is associated with higher risk of autism in children.

“CHARGE has obtained a wealth of environmental, demographic and medical information on young children and their parents and provides a solid basis for a variety of epidemiologic studies,” said Hertz-Picciotto. “Those studies are helping us find ways to protect childhood neurodevelopment.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study, “Is maternal influenza or fever during pregnancy associated with autism or developmental delays? Results from the CHARGE (Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) Study,” was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (grants R01-ES015359 and P01-ES11269), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s STAR program (grants R-829388 and R-833292) and the UC Davis MIND Institute. The study is available at http://www.springerlink.com/content/x7602q07w228t313/?MUD=MP.
In addition to Zerbo and Hertz-Picciotto, other UC Davis authors were Robin Hansen of the Department of Pediatrics, Sally Ozonoff of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Cheryl Walker of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Ana-Maria Iosif of the Department of Public Health Sciences. Hertz-Picciotto, Hansen, Ozonoff and Walker are also affiliated with the UC Davis MIND (Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders) Institute.
University of California – Davis Health System Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

University of California – Davis Health System. “Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles The Risk Of Autism Or Developmental Delay.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 25 May. 2012. Web.
1 Jun. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles The Risk Of Autism Or Developmental Delay’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam)

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


View the original article here

Early intervention services

Early intervention services

Childhood intervention programs for the disadvantaged focus on the benefits that accrue to the children. Programs may influence the parents (typically the mother), as most programs provide services to the mother as well as the child.

To be eligible for services, children must be less than 3 years of age and have a confirmed disability or established developmental delay, as determined by the state, in one or more of the following areas of development: physical, cognitive, communication, social-emotional, and/or adaptive.

Autism Treatment and Intervention

The Early Intervention Program offers a rich variety of therapeutic and support services to eligible infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families, including:

• family education and counseling, home visits, and parent support groups
• special instruction
• speech pathology and audiology
• occupational therapy
• physical therapy
• psychological services
• service coordination
• nursing services
• nutrition services
• social work services
• vision services
• assistive technology devices and services

Early intervention applies to children of school age or younger who are discovered to have or are at risk of developing a handicapping condition or other special need that may affect their development. Early intervention consists of the provision of services to such children and their families for the purpose of lessening the effects of the condition. Early intervention can be remedial or preventive in nature – remediating existing developmental problems or preventing their occurrence.

Early intervention may focus on the child alone or on the child and the family together.

Early intervention programs may be center-based, home-based, hospital-based, or a combination. Services range from identification – that is, hospital or school screening and referral services – to diagnostic and direct intervention programs. Early intervention may begin at any time between birth and school age; however, there are many reasons for it to begin as early as possible.

Tagged as: Early intervention services

View the original article here

Reducing Bathroom Battles When Potty Training Your ASD Child

Potty training a normal, healthy child can propel any parent into a state of anxiety, overwhelm and exhaustion. Now let’s consider what potty training is like for a parent when their child is on the Autism spectrum? A child with Autism may have sensory issues that get in the way or they may not even understand what it means to use the potty.

Here are some things to consider when potty training a child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to reduce the number of bathroom battles you encounter.

• Determine if your child is ready to be potty trained. Just because all the books say readiness occurs between the ages of 18 months to 4 years for a neuro-typical child it does not mean your child with Autism has the ability to do so. A developmental delay can carry over into many areas and postpone readiness. Does your child know when he is wet or has a dirty diaper? Does your daughter have a dry diaper all night?

• Find out what your child’s elimination schedule is. It does not take long to do this. Keep notes on when your child’s diaper is soiled or wet? Notice the time it takes your child to eliminate after he eats or drinks. Keeping a journal for three to five days will determine a pattern. Then you will know the times to focus on potty training the most.

• Do not punish the child for accidents. If your child has an accident remind them that is what the potty is for. Calmly clean up the mess with your child’s assistance, even if on a limited basis. Make sure everyone caring for your child uses the same approach as well. Mixed messages will not help.

• Does your child have the skills to undress and redress? If not this can make potty training more challenging unless you have the luxury to let your child run around naked for the next month or two. You will also need to make time for wiping up puddles and scrubbing carpets and upholstery.

• Do not give up – remain consistent. If your child does not catch on right away do not give up. It takes a few weeks for a new skill to be learned. If you keep switching from diapers to the potty this will just confuse your child even more. Consistency is the key factor when potty training. This goes for any child not just children with Autism.

• Make the potty and your bathroom user friendly. Eliminating any source of stress or anxiety will help your child relax about potty training. Let your child see the potty and get familiar with it before they are made to sit there. Consider writing a social story about the potty chair and what it is used for. This will help them become comfortable with the idea.

Remember children with Autism are more likely to take longer to learn a new skill so be patient and stay relaxed. If your child senses tension you may be in for more battles than you bargain for. To increase you chances for potty training success you want to make sure you eliminate as much of your child’s anxiety as possible.

Connie Hammer, MSW, parent educator, consultant and coach, guides parents of young children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder to uncover abilities and change possibilities. Visit her website http://www.parentcoachingforautism.com/ to get your FREE resources – a parenting e-course, Parenting a Child with Autism – 3 Secrets to Thrive and a weekly parenting tip newsletter, The Spectrum.

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