Tag Archives: Cooperation

Question?: Autistic Disorder

Joseph asks…

How can I help my son who was diagnosed with mild autism?

My son is 3 and a half & was recently diagnosed with mild autism. Developmentally is a year behind in his speech & comprehension development. He still has difficulty answering “yes & no” questions & obviously he talks like a child who is just learning to talk. His answers & comments seem as if they are robotic & that he is not really thinking about what he is saying. It is a few months before his next doctors appointment & I know he will start various types of therapy. My question is what can I do in the meantime to help him with his language & communication skills? I have flash cards, & am aware of the “obvious” things you typically do to teach children. But I feel that I need some fresh ideas, because he doesn’t learn like other children due to his autistic disorder.

admin answers:

Hi:-) I have 2 HFA children. 6 and 4 years of age. Until you get therapy which I know can take forever to get…. You have to require language of him. In other words if you know he knows how to ask for something or if he knows the word for something you need not give in for 1/2 language. Require him to tell you if he knows. No matter what kind of fit you might get. Autistic children can be very resistant to change. The flash cards are great! I would sit with my children and when they were learning basic language and we would do flash cards. Try to be flexible in your approach. If he wants to put the correct ones in a box let him. Or if he wants to hold them let him. Make sure he gets a tangible reward for his cooperation. Also make sure some of the cards he knows to avoid frustration. Talk to him all the time about what things are and what they do even if you do not think he is listening. Take him to open places and pick flowers and tell him what they are. Appeal to his curiosity. There is alot you can do. Be creative. I hope this helps. I have been down this road twice. And still traveling.

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Taking a Look at Aspergers Symptoms

Aspergers syndrome is on the range of behaviors classified as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Aspergers is considered to be at the high end of functioning for patients suffering from autism. Diagnosis at this end of the range can sometimes be difficult because symptoms can be subtle depending on the functionality of the involved individual.

The behaviors known to make up the spectrum of autism are very much social in nature. They can be detected in familial interactions as well as alone time. It is the social implications of the behaviors that speak to the necessity of its early diagnosis.

Probably the most commonly known symptom for autism comes in the form of repetitive behaviors. This particular symptom can be seen all across the spectrum. It is the degree to which such patterns are practiced as well as what it takes to cause cessation that can be useful in determining the severity of the disease.

Obviously, if an individual is so committed to knocking his/her head against the wall that he/she cannot be distracted, functioning is very much impaired and diagnosis would be on the low end of the spectrum. However, repetitive behaviors practiced on a much smaller scale can be seen by observers as annoyances instead of symptoms. That can be a problem for an undiagnosed aspergers victim.

Other symptoms of Aspergers are not so obvious. Individuals afflicted can have problems with social interactions and may present like they are not even interested in them. Difficulties with communication can look like speech issues when they could in fact be caused by an inability to read body language or other skills necessary for conversation.

Creative play, abstract thinking, and changing course outside their little box can be very difficult too making interactive play and teamwork a struggle. Aspergers kids can also be very literal setting them up to not understand the nuances of communication and cooperation. Understanding the concept of sharing and the importance of empathy can all be challenging to grasp.

Any combination of these aspergers symptoms leaves an afflicted person with a list of behaviors that interfere with social interactions and prevent relationship building. Despite the fact many look like they don’t care about relationships, most want to fit in just like the rest of us. Early intervention to teach necessary social skills can give those diagnosed with Asperger’s Sypmtoms the tools they need to lead happy, productive lives.

If you would like to know more, check out the many resources available on the web, and do not forget to view the Asperger’s Sypmtoms

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