Tag Archives: Confidence

Question?: Adhd In Adults

Mandy asks…

Can my recent ADHD diagnosis affect my application to medical schools?

I have recently been diagnosed with adult ADHD. I am wondering if my ADHD diagnosis will in any way affect my chances of getting into med school? Also, does anyone know if there are doctors who themselves have/had ADHD? I tried searching it up on the internet, but not much luck.

Please respond, someone. Thank you very much in advance.

admin answers:

Hi blockmoncherry –

I don’t know for certain, but I do NOT believe your ADHD diagnosis can or will affect your application to medical school. I don’t believe they can keep you out for having a diagnosis, although I suppose anything is possible in this day and age.

When I think of application and interview processes for college and graduate schools (including medical schools), the process is focused more on who you are and how you tell your story. If you speak with confidence and professionalism, conveying your interest in the work you want to do, that is what matters the most.

Everyone has a story to tell..everyone has differences and challenges….it’s just a matter of how you convey them.

Back to the diagnosis and affecting your application. I just don’t think it’s possible… That to me screams discrimination, and yes I know plenty of people who have gone to medical school who have ADHD and who are now wonderful doctors in many specialty areas.

The only places I have really heard about ADHD impacting your ability to perform certain jobs is in the field of being an airline pilot (if diagnosed and taking medications), and perhaps the military has some regulations around the diagnosis.

Other than that you should be good.

Are you looking for specific doctors with ADHD? I had a client who was an incredibly successful family physician who has ADHD, and has achieved amazing things. A very close friend of mine is a psychologist who has been diagnosed with ADHD.

You can do this! If you are passionate and focused, you can make this happen.

Hope this helps.

Rory

Rory F. Stern, PsyD
“Former therapist” and ADHD Coach
http://www.ADHDEssentialsKit.com

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Question?: Autistic Disorder

Ken asks…

How do you know what mental disability you really have?

I’ve had one psychologist and therapist think i had an autistic disorder,one think i had an autistic disorder vs psychosis,one think i had either autism,bipolar or ocd,and my recent ones said i only had bipolar with features of autism.My therapist thinks i am partly vindictive so its hard to say.How would you know which one fits?

admin answers:

You must find a therapist who has your confidence, if you want to make progress towards better mental health.

Decide who it is that seems to best in tune with you, accept that person’s diagnosis, and follow his or her advice.

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Question?: What Is Autism

Sandy asks…

How can I get my toddler with autism to feed himself?

I have a toddler with Autism. He is 18 months. I want to teach him to spoon feed himself. Any tips?

admin answers:

I worked with older adults for awhile and I just want to say that autism isn’t a bad thing, I bet your toddler is an adorable baby and will turn out to be a wonderful person. I think that you should first try to introduce and practice things little by little, adding on. For example, have him hold the spoon, and see if he can pick it up, and then practice that for awhile, if it makes no sense to your toddler, then eat in front of him while adding on to the process. If none of these suggestions work, then keep experimenting because the learning style might be very different. Oh yes, and if your toddler gets frustrated with learning, if he can’t do it right away and starts crying or something, show something to him that he can do, like if he draws, have him do that for awhile until his confidence is up again. Then continue to experiment with his learning style. This is actually really good because if you can find his niche with learning (the best way for him to learn) and the way to present it where he is most successful, he will grow a lot. If you are supportive, and loving and persistent, I am sure he will do great! You are so lucky to be able to have a beautiful baby! Good luck! Katie.

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i blinked

~

So I’ve been tryin’ to slow it down
I’ve been tryin’ to take it in
In this here today, gone tomorrow world we’re livin’ in
Don’t blink

~ Kenny Chesney, Don’t Blink

~

Katie, 2003

*

Tomorrow, we will drive that little girl to sleep away camp, two hours from home.

That tiny imp, no bigger than a minute, will be away for three-and-a-half weeks.

The time will pass quickly.

It will feel like an eternity.

I am thrilled.

I am terrified.

I am overjoyed for her. I know not a soul who deserves it more.

A place to be herself. Not defined by anything nor anyone else. Simply herself.

Her argument was as sound as it was out of the blue – I really want this. I’m ready, Mama. I can handle it. I want a chance to make real friends.

Her requests were clear – All girls, horseback riding, a pond or a lake, and, most importantly – a place where I know no one.

A fresh slate.

A chance to start anew outside the contrived hierarchy of school.

Independence.

Growth.

Confidence.

A place of her own.

She’s ready.

I think.

I hope.

I’m not.

I am terrified.

I don’t know how to surrender my heart for three-and-a-half weeks.

But I will.

I am so proud of her.

I am terrified.

Tomorrow, we will drive that little girl to sleep away camp, two hours from home.

And she will thrive.

Damn it, I blinked.

Katie on Sunday

~

It’s not living if you don’t reach for the sky

I’ll have tears as you take off

But I’ll cheer as you fly

~ Mark Harris, Find your Wings

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Am I Spoiling My Child With Autism or Pushing Too Much?

We all want to be confident that we are doing our best as parents but confidence can be difficult to maintain when our well intentioned friends and relatives sometimes judge us to be too demanding or too indulging where our children are concerned. Their declarations and suggestions come from the non-Autistic world – a perspective that has limited knowledge of raising a child with Autism and therefore is difficult to accept. Our job is to help educate them otherwise but that takes time and parents of children with special needs don’t have much of that.

Parents of children on the Autism spectrum are focused on finding their way through this unpredictable journey of Autism, learning as they go. Finding the right balance when parenting any child is a challenge but exploring uncharted waters such as these takes extra energy as well.

A good parent is always examining his or her skills and evaluating them for effectiveness while being open to make adjustments along the way. Getting stuck in default mode or a pattern of responding that might be a bit too indulgent is easy to fall in to and difficult to get out of at times. Avoiding a dilemma such as this requires being open minded and receptive to creating new ways of relating to your child.

With this in mind, I always encourage parents to keep the end goal in mind because it will help you stay on the most direct path to your child’s best future.

Occasionally ask yourself:

What type of person do I want my daughter to be?

What type of skills and values do I want my son to have as an adult?

And the most important question of all,

Is what I am doing right now as helping my child get to where I would like them to be as an adult?

If the aim is to have an independent individual blossom, have the courage to ask yourself if you are doing too much to keep your child dependent? Yes, sometimes it is easier and quicker to do things yourself but it may be robbing your child of learning and mastering a crucial daily living skill. A child who is not able to care for himself adequately is one thing but being able to and having someone else do it for him is another.

How much we enable our children or encourage them to do for them selves will depend on where they are on the Autism spectrum. The one thing that will differ from child to child is the starting point. But wherever we begin from, we should always be moving our children forward towards the person we know they can become. Sometimes all they can manage is baby steps and other days they may even regress backwards but the question should always be; How have I moved my child towards her potential today?

Every parent wants their child to reach for the stars and grab the ones they can and parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder are no different. Just how accommodating do you need to be in order to help your child grab the stars within reach and how forceful do you need to be in order for your child to stretch a bit further for more? For any child to accomplish all he is capable of and more, finding just the right balance between not enough pressure and too much is extremely important.

Finding the best way to motivate your children without unknowingly discouraging them can be tricky. And just as Goldilocks did, every parent needs to find a method that is “not too easy, not too tough, but just right” for each child.

How does a parent find just the right touch? Here are six strategies to keep in mind for discovering just what your child needs to blossom.

• Take baby steps – Pacing one’s self and finding a rhythm are the first things that come to mind when knowing just how much to push or not. Breaking things down into small and attainable steps is always wise. If you want your child with Autism to become more social, then gradually expose him or her to small chunks of time in a social setting. Start with five minutes, and then add one or two minutes more after each success.

• Motivate your child internally. On of the best indicators of success is how self-motivated a person is. Unfortunately, parents sometimes spend too much time trying to get their children to comply with the use of external rewards. To help your child acquire a way to self-motivate, it is always better to focus on using praise – and praise for effort more than you do on outcome. The sooner a child gets a sense that they have power and control over their own learning by the amount of effort they put into it, the less likely you will have to prod them along.

• Tap into interests – Always try to tie in one of your child’s favorite activities or pastimes into the experience when you are gently nudging her towards a goal. This will help stimulate her internal motivation to stretch herself as much as possible. When your goal is to reduce a repetitive behavior, distracting your child with another activity or task that they really favor is helpful.

• Watch for signs of stress or success – Always be on the alert for signals of distress and have a plan B on hand that is ready to put in place. Stress is counterproductive to progress and can easily lure your child on the Autism spectrum into a state of frustration and anxiety that can lead to a negative experience making it unlikely that your child will want to pick up again where she left off. On the other hand, if you see success, celebrate it!

• Create enjoyment – Who doesn’t like fun? Find a way to keep things light and humorous. Not only will your child delight in the process more but the contagious nature of laughter will spread throughout your child and help create a positive and powerful energy that is bound to increase his stamina towards his goal.

• Make adjustments as needed – Paying attention to your child’s ability to transition is important here. When you know an adjustment has to be made begin shifting gears as gently as possible considering what you know about your child’s tolerance for change. The skill and finesse at which you make this happen will directly correlate to paving the way to success

Connie Hammer, MSW, parent educator, consultant and coach, guides parents of young children recently diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder to uncover abilities and change possibilities. Visit her website http://www.parentcoachingforautism.com/ to get your FREE resources – a parenting e-course, Parenting a Child with Autism – 3 Secrets to Thrive and a weekly parenting tip newsletter, The Spectrum.

View the original article here

Does Your Child Play Well With Others? Boosting Their Social Success

Waste Stream 10 Detail Children Playing

Does Your Child Play Well With Others? Boosting Their Social Success

Establishing social relationships is one of the earliest milestones children of school age achieve. These interactions begin to build what will be their lifelong socialization habits. Learning how to meet new people, make friends, and get along with others are all critical skills.

Some children, however, are challenged more than others in this important area of life. If you recognize that your child is struggling with making friends and sustaining connections, you can implement strategies to help them succeed socially.

Use these techniques to help your child learn important social skills that will serve them well their entire life:

1. Establish and maintain open communication. Provide plenty of verbal encouragement to help your child build confidence in social interactions.

2. Keep your eyes open. Notice how your child relates to other children in the neighborhood, at school and during extracurricular activities.

* Does he seem excessively shy? Does he stand alone, waiting for others to approach him? Or do classmates make efforts but he doesn’t respond? You can gather information about your child’s social life simply by observing him in the presence of peers.

* When your child performs socially appropriate behavior, mention it later. Say something like, “It was nice of you to offer a cookie to Jim today.” Reinforce any positive actions you observed.

3. Set up a play date at your house. Talk with your child first about inviting a friend to come over to play. For example, you could start the conversation by asking her opinion, like, “Sally, would you like for Patty to come over to play Saturday morning?”

* Sally will most likely say, “Yes.” If she says “no,” inquire about why she doesn’t want Patty to come over.

* Arrange the play date with the other parent(s). To ensure the kids won’t get bored or tired, avoid making the first one too long. Depending on your child’s age, 1-2 hours should be adequate. Have some snacks on hand.

4. Ask your child the day before the play date how she’d like to spend the time. This conversation prompts her to consider activities she’d enjoy. Allow her to choose the activity as long as it’s safe, inside your home or in your yard, and is feasible (consider the weather).

* If your child doesn’t offer an idea, be encouraging and say, “I’m sure the two of you will come up with something fun to do.” Refrain from micro-managing the play date, if possible.

* This conversation plants the idea that when we have friends over, we share time doing something fun that we both enjoy. Also, she learns that being a friend requires some effort. Posing the question is a subtle way to teach her how to be appropriately social.

5. Make your home a fun place for kids. Doing so might boost your child’s social life. Do you have a family room with a television, DVDs, a video game console, books, board games, or other kid-friendly activities?

6. Spend a bit of time helping your child clean her room. After all, don’t we get ready for company in advance? These efforts illustrate for kids how friends behave and how social relationships are conducted.

7. When the play date occurs, leave the children to their own devices. Usually, two kids can figure out how to spend time. Check on them often to ensure they’re relating well. Intervene only when necessary (if play is too rowdy or loud or one or both kids seem bored).

* Your child will begin building confidence about social relationships after just one successful play date.

Preparing your child for social relationships can be fun for all and quite rewarding. These parenting techniques are fairly simple and yield beautiful results. Help your child learn to interact with others in a positive and meaningful way as they start to explore the world outside your home.

View the original article here

How Can You Help Your Autistic Child Create Friendships?

Friends are important to people. Having friends and creating friends for your autistic child could be challenging. How will you be able to accept this challenge and help your child who has the disorder of autism, create friendships?

It is imperative to know your child.Know his or her weaknesses and strengths. Consider the social limitations your child may have. Not only participating with autistic children, but non-autistic children. Each child is unique and may need various kinds of help or coaching for encouragement and to gain confidence.

Some autistic children may have difficulty in expressing their verbal language. In addition, not being able to understand verbal language from other children. This can make it a challenge to communicate and create friendships with other children and autistic children.

Therefore, it is wise to determine the limitations your child may have, before you decide, your child should socialize and create friendships.

By taking this action, you will learn what your child is expressing and what he or she is able to handle. This will determine what kind of friends are appropriate for your individual to socialize with, when trying to create friendships.

Set a play date for that is fun for your child and other children. This could be done at school, or outside of the classroom. Take time to find the right situation for your child and other children to participate in.

When you do find the time that will work for all of the children, and the place, keep the time short and limited. This will eliminate stress, frustration and rejection from other children. By being aware of this and taking charge of the situation, your child will probably want to continue this activity or another one. It will help to create friends at his or her own pace.

If your child does not like crowds, bright lights, loud noises, confusing activities, multiple activities, take this into consideration. Do not force your child to take part in areas, where you know he or she will become upset. What is a fun activity or place for some children, could be extremely overwhelming for a child with the disorder of autism.

Another way you can help your autistic child create friendships is, if you have made many attempts for your child to participate in activities, new places, new times, to socialize and it does not seem to be working, perhaps it is time for you to be creative with a new idea or plan.

If you know your child, you will know if he or she needs more time to adjust to other individuals, activities, new places, etc. Be sure you are not placing an enormous amount of pressure on your child, by having too high expectations for him or her to socialize on your terms and thoughts. Instead, take into consideration each individual is different. You will want to evaluate your motives for encouraging creative friendships and socialization for your child.

If your child feels comfortable with one friend and is having fun, that may be all that is necessary for the present time. You may find you do not need to create more friendships or have your child participate in more social activities. Keep the pace simple for creating new friendships. Do not push your child into new friendships, when one or two friends could be enough and it will avoid unwanted stress.

Bonita Darula operates a web sight==> http://www.autismintoawareness.com/ SIGN up to RECEIVE your COMPLIMENTARY WEEKLY AUTISTIC NEWSLETTER on current TOPICS. For example: How can you help your child create and have friends? Order your Autism updated information from your Complimentary Autistic Newsletter to help your child and you.

View the original article here

Does Your Child Play Well With Others? Boosting Their Social Success

Waste Stream 10 Detail Children Playing

Does Your Child Play Well With Others? Boosting Their Social Success

Establishing social relationships is one of the earliest milestones children of school age achieve. These interactions begin to build what will be their lifelong socialization habits. Learning how to meet new people, make friends, and get along with others are all critical skills.

Some children, however, are challenged more than others in this important area of life. If you recognize that your child is struggling with making friends and sustaining connections, you can implement strategies to help them succeed socially.

Use these techniques to help your child learn important social skills that will serve them well their entire life:

1. Establish and maintain open communication. Provide plenty of verbal encouragement to help your child build confidence in social interactions.

2. Keep your eyes open. Notice how your child relates to other children in the neighborhood, at school and during extracurricular activities.

* Does he seem excessively shy? Does he stand alone, waiting for others to approach him? Or do classmates make efforts but he doesn’t respond? You can gather information about your child’s social life simply by observing him in the presence of peers.

* When your child performs socially appropriate behavior, mention it later. Say something like, “It was nice of you to offer a cookie to Jim today.” Reinforce any positive actions you observed.

3. Set up a play date at your house. Talk with your child first about inviting a friend to come over to play. For example, you could start the conversation by asking her opinion, like, “Sally, would you like for Patty to come over to play Saturday morning?”

* Sally will most likely say, “Yes.” If she says “no,” inquire about why she doesn’t want Patty to come over.

* Arrange the play date with the other parent(s). To ensure the kids won’t get bored or tired, avoid making the first one too long. Depending on your child’s age, 1-2 hours should be adequate. Have some snacks on hand.

4. Ask your child the day before the play date how she’d like to spend the time. This conversation prompts her to consider activities she’d enjoy. Allow her to choose the activity as long as it’s safe, inside your home or in your yard, and is feasible (consider the weather).

* If your child doesn’t offer an idea, be encouraging and say, “I’m sure the two of you will come up with something fun to do.” Refrain from micro-managing the play date, if possible.

* This conversation plants the idea that when we have friends over, we share time doing something fun that we both enjoy. Also, she learns that being a friend requires some effort. Posing the question is a subtle way to teach her how to be appropriately social.

5. Make your home a fun place for kids. Doing so might boost your child’s social life. Do you have a family room with a television, DVDs, a video game console, books, board games, or other kid-friendly activities?

6. Spend a bit of time helping your child clean her room. After all, don’t we get ready for company in advance? These efforts illustrate for kids how friends behave and how social relationships are conducted.

7. When the play date occurs, leave the children to their own devices. Usually, two kids can figure out how to spend time. Check on them often to ensure they’re relating well. Intervene only when necessary (if play is too rowdy or loud or one or both kids seem bored).

* Your child will begin building confidence about social relationships after just one successful play date.

Preparing your child for social relationships can be fun for all and quite rewarding. These parenting techniques are fairly simple and yield beautiful results. Help your child learn to interact with others in a positive and meaningful way as they start to explore the world outside your home.

View the original article here

How To Help A Child With Aspergers

As a teacher an ample knowledge regarding a child with aspergers would benefit you.  It would be advantageous if you would understand the needs and wants of children with the syndrome. Kids who have this syndrome have issues with communication; they don’t interact well with their classmates. Interaction skills are very essential. They are crucial to a child’s improvement. Kids need to be equipped with the necessary social skills that they might excel later on in life. The speech pattern should be improved, and teachers must find a way to help these children upgrade their social and interaction skills.

Children with the syndrome don’t usually maintain eye contact. Eye contact is essential to improve nonverbal communication. Its of utmost importance to find ways to help children comprehend that eye contact should be sustained while talking with others. It can help them to build trust and confidence among their peers. Kids will have a hard time maintaining their social group if they will not gain the social esteem that a child should have. The tone of voice and natural way of speaking is essential. A child must be educated on the importance of expressing their emotions well without resorting to violent outbursts.

Children have various levels of maturity, several kinds of treatment and ways of educating need. All these require to be mastered so that one will become an effective teacher. Its rewarding to be able to help a kid with Aspergers relate well with others.

The goal is to prevent the negative perception that a kid could exhibit if he or she did not comprehend something. Kids with Asperger may be vulnerable to changes and disruptions in their daily life. A small change will trigger their behavior and they may react in an unpleasant manner. Kids with the syndrome tend to react in a different way. They have their own sense of right and wrong and this could result to a confused state. Its a need for teachers and parents to help them get to know and recognize why they should undergo changes.

Parents along with teachers need to learn as much as they would with regard to the syndrome. Every year there is a new research regarding the subject which will help them in dealing with varying circumstances. One needs to be prepared and willing to undergo learning and unlearning so as to get to the results they want.  To help a kid with aspergers experience a happy life, love and understanding helps a lot.

To discover your best resource of parental information as it refers to raising kids with aspergers check out http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com
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Effective Aspergers Treatments for Children

The only common thing among Aspergers patients is that their symptoms come in a variety of ways, therefore treatment has to be varied case to case. Each child will need different areas of treatment, so there are different treatment options available. As with anything, the more knowledge that is gained about this condition, the easier children and adults are finding to live with it. Depending on the needs of your child, the following treatments can be helpful.

Some children with Aspergers find that cognitive behavior therapy can be quite helpful. While not a cure, it is designed to help the child control disruptive or upsetting behavior. Aspergers can show itself through several types of behavior that can complicate life for the child and those around them.

Examples of these behaviors include temper tantrums, anxiety disorders and temper tantrums. Cognitive behavior therapy focuses on specific problems and teaches the child new skills to change their responses. The purpose is to boost the child’s confidence so it is then easier for them to interact with others.

You may find that a conversation with the school psychologist can be helpful if your child has Aspergers syndrome. In many cases, its possible for children with Aspergers to function at a high level in school, but it’s essential to work with the school and find out about any services they offer. In any areas that your child has difficulty in, whether it be socially or academically, the school officials can help with this. From the principals to the teachers, take the time to get to know each as much as possible. While the average parent should strive to do this, it is vital for parents with children with Aspergers.

Not only will you feel more comfortable sharing your concerns, but the school is more likely to keep you informed of your child’s progress.

Parent to parent networking is important for parents of children with Aspergers syndrome. Look for support groups in your area. You can also find online groups and forums. These can all be good places to share information, tips and offer each other moral support.

Learn from those who have older children with Aspergers and have been dealing with this for years. Other treatment options may be discovered through these resources, that even your doctor or child’s psychologist have not thought of. With all the information available to us these days, it is nice to find someone who is in a similar circumstance. Other parents can be a huge help when dealing with Aspergers syndrome. Even experts still have a lot to learn about Aspergers. If someone in your family has this condition, you have to observe them and see what does and doesn’t work. To help your child with Aspergers adjust to his world, keep the above suggestions in mind and consult regularly with a qualified doctor. The article author has been writing article content for several years. Head to his website about cheap gym equipment. They have also another great new site on custom closet systems.
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