Tag Archives: Communication Skills

Question?: Rett Syndrome In Boys

Lisa asks…

what is Rett’s syndrome?

admin answers:

What is Rett syndrome?
Rett syndrome is a unique developmental disorder that is first recognized in infancy and seen almost always in girls, but can be rarely seen in boys. It is caused by mutations on the X chromosome on a gene called MECP2. There are more than 200 different mutations found on the MECP2 gene. Most of these mutations are found in eight different “hot spots.” It strikes all racial and ethnic groups, and occurs worldwide in 1 of every 10,000 to 23,000 female births.

Rett syndrome is a developmental disorder. It is not a degenerative disorder. It causes problems in brain function that are responsible for cognitive, sensory, emotional, motor and autonomic function. These can include learning, speech, sensory sensations, mood, movement, breathing, cardiac function, and even chewing, swallowing, and digestion.

Rett syndrome symptoms appear after an early period of apparently normal or near normal development until six to eighteen months of life, when there is a slowing down or stagnation of skills. A period of regression then follows when she loses communication skills and purposeful use of her hands. Soon, stereotyped hand movements such as handwashing, gait disturbances, and slowing of the normal rate of head growth become apparent. Other problems may include seizures and disorganized breathing patterns while she is awake. In the early years, there may be a period of isolation or withdrawal when she is irritable and cries inconsolably. Over time, motor problems may increase, but in general, irritability lessens and eye contact and communication improve.

Rett syndrome is confirmed with a simple blood test to identify the MECP2 mutation. However, since the MECP2 mutation is also seen in other disorders, the presence of the MECP2 mutation in itself is not enough for the diagnosis of Rett syndrome. Diagnosis requires either the presence of the mutation (a molecular diagnosis) or fulfillment of the diagnostic criteria (a clinical diagnosis, based on signs and symptoms that you can observe) or both.

Rett syndrome can present with a wide range of disability ranging from mild to severe. The course and severity of Rett syndrome is determined by the location, type and severity of her mutation and X-inactivation. Therefore, two girls of the same age with the same mutation can appear quite different.

Rett syndrome presents many challenges, but with love, therapy and assistance, those with the syndrome can benefit from school and community activities well into middle age and beyond. They experience a full range of emotions and show their engaging personalities as they take part in social, educational, and recreational activities at home and in the community.
Http://www.rettsyndrome.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=16&Itemid=1000

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Question?: Angry Autistic Kids

Thomas asks…

Need help if my three year old sounds autistic?

Hello I have a three year old, that has recently been tested for autism, but came back inconclusive for a number of reasons i.e. When asking me about my sons communication skills, I didn’t know what they meant by Joint attention or gestures ( I know I’m stupid) so I would say ‘no’ that he doesn’t do those things… even though judging by my son’s speech therapist and the psychologist and developmental ped that assessed him could see that he could do those things. So anyway, my son is going to have a second assessment and when they ask me questions, I want to make sure that I get it right. Here are a list of things that my son does.
1. Uses joint attention…. to much intact.. he would look at me..point.. and look at me to show me a thing he’s interested in i.e. this could be images in a book, showing me he’s drawing… showing em something he’s interested in etc etc.
2. My son has a speech delay
3. My son uses a lot natural gestures ( That I HAVE NOT TAUGHT HIM).. so this could be ” brushing his teeth” would be in gestures, using his fingers, showing his teeth and animating with his finger the motion to brush his teeth…..” wash hands” would be the two of his hands clamped together doing the motion of washing his hands…..” upset’ would be shrugging shoulders would be or folding arms. ” open” would be animating different ways with he’s hands to open with an object.
3. Plays toys appropriately and has good pretend/imaginary play skills i.e. flying helicopter or rocket, cooking, feeding baby etc.. although occasionally he would lie down sideways and build he’s blocks ( which is a concern
4. If he does not get what he wants this would go into a tantrum
5. doesn’t seem to understand patience some of the times *sigh*
6.Flaps arms when angry
7. Plays with kids and knows how to share
8.Has no routine issue whatsoever, but remembers the places which I treat him too e.g. Mcdonalds…toy stores and if we walk past these ” special treat stores” wants to go in *sigh again*
9.Toilet trained.. sleep is fine
10. Can be too hyperactive, running around ( which is tiring)
11. Always wants to play with me ( which can be annoying sometimes) this could be him making me want to out on our 3D glasses and him pointing to the mirror so that we can pull faces… our sleeping game, so he would gesture sleep, and I have to fake sleep and he would diliberalty make noise and I’ll have to wake up and tickle him…. also with games too.
12. Self care needs are advanced
13. Really good at imitating
14. Can be shy
15. seems to understand more, even though speech is limited
16. seems to always want my attention…through crying… wanting me to cuddle him… playing
17. Has a good sense of where I am, e.g say like if I am out of his sight, he would always look back to s where I am or where I have gone too.

I think the main thing for me is his tantrums, he may have an allergy too. Also, he is quite shy and does not show his true self to people.. most of the things have mentioned on this list..only me, his speech therapist, family and close friends have seen this side of him, to strangers he doesn’t open up easily which is sad. Anyway, does my list sound like he has autism and what concerns should I bring up to the psychologist?
@Alicia- Thanks for your comment, when actually listing things which my son does, autism sounds less and I am actually thinking that it could be ADHD..OR ADD.. his dad has said this, that it sounds like ADHD not autism. Although, It can be argued that the fact because he is speech delayed, this adds to frustration..if it is ADHD and not autism, I would be worried that it may result for him to take medication.. which I would not result too. I am aware that ADHD cannot be diagnosed under the age of 5.

admin answers:

Autism is the inability to understand other people as being people with their own wants, needs, and emotions. Something that three-year children also tend to be bad at. Like what has been said before, most of what you are describing sounds a lot like a normal three-year old. The speech doesn’t seem to be important, as your son seems to be able to communicate. Most children learn to talk well because baby talk just gets a “What did you say” response from adults, so children learn to enunciate so as to be understood and get what they want from adults. You’re sons gestures sound like he has found a way of getting out of having to talk properly (if you have ever learned a second language, then you would know how difficult this is). I am curious as to what what would happen if you refused to acknowledge his gestures and insist that he talk more to get what he wants.

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Question?: Autism Signs And Symptoms

John asks…

How many people have children with Autism?

Any type of autism on the spectrum. This is for a project at school. Just tell me about your experiences with Autistic (or Asperger’s) Children

admin answers:

1 in 88 children have autism (1 in 54 boys) 3/4 of children with autism are boys, the fourth is a girl. “classic” or “full blown autism” can be directed by the age of 2, warning signs are lack of eye contact, little or no speech, and a lack of other communication skills.

Asperger’s syndrome is a “high functioning” form of autism- meaning it shares the same basis of lacking communication skills with classic autism, but symptoms are far more severe.

I am a teen with asperger’s syndrome, and my main symptoms are severe anxiety, not knowing what to say in a conversation, having obsessions or fixations on things like trains, air planes, & computers, and no eye contact (this is due to anxiety). Most kids with mild autism also have other learning disabilities, like ADHD.

There is also a thing a lot of autistic people do called “stimming” It means self stimulation. You might see autistic kids doing things like rocking back and forth (it’s soothing) and flapping their hands, (I do this when excited).

One important thing to know about autistic individuals often are very proud to have autism, even though it is viewed by others as a disability. THERE IS NO CURE. But certain therapies DO help, like physical therapy, talk therapy, and social skills help.

THIS SHOULD JUST ABOUT SUM UP YOUR PROJECT!

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Question?: Pdd

Helen asks…

Anyone with a child that has a speech delay and/or PDD?

Was potty training more difficult for you? What worked?

My son is 3 and has both pdd and a speech delay and I am having a really hard time. I figure it is hard with a child that has normal communication skills, but he just doesn’t understand what I am getting at when I try to show him anything with the potty! Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

admin answers:

Yes I know where you are coming from. My eldest daughter is now 5 years old and she didn’t talk till she was nearly 3 years old. She was diagnosed at 2 yr old with Williams Syndrome. Like you tho, toilet training was a nightmare! Eventually we did get there but probably more thanks to her younger sister who is now 3. It took our now 5 year old 14 months to toilet train her but just during the day. She still isn’t night trained yet but that is for another time! She also just didn’t get it. Now that we have had her diagnosed with mild intellectual impairment, this has made things a little easier for us because we at least know what she is and isn’t capable of understanding to a degree but we still have our bad days that’s for sure. We just kept persisting with her, but it was frustrating. When we started to train our then 2 year old, we were preparing ourselves for a tough road of training but to our surprise and huge relief, our 2nd child only took 8 weeks to train for both wees and poos. A couple of months later she trained herself at night too so no more nappies or pull up for her thank god! Now that my eldest and 2nd child are both trained we are hoping that our youngest now 21 months will be just as quick as her 2nd sister. Really sweetie, it will take a lot of patience on your behalf. Get him to watch daddy too if possible. All children are different so what may work for one child with a speech delay may not work for another. Have you been in contact with your child’s speech therapist or an occupational therapist? They can definitely help though. But seriously, don’t be in a hurry sweetie, it will happen in time. My hubby and I also did a course called “The Hanan Program – It takes two to talk” which is designed for children with speech delays and within 10 weeks we were getting words and very short sentences from our daughter. It doesn’t work for all children but it will definitely help mum and dad and therefore may still assist the child. Ask your child’s doctor or therapist about it if you are able. Good luck sweetie and all the very best of wishes.

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Question?: Autistic Disorder

Joseph asks…

How can I help my son who was diagnosed with mild autism?

My son is 3 and a half & was recently diagnosed with mild autism. Developmentally is a year behind in his speech & comprehension development. He still has difficulty answering “yes & no” questions & obviously he talks like a child who is just learning to talk. His answers & comments seem as if they are robotic & that he is not really thinking about what he is saying. It is a few months before his next doctors appointment & I know he will start various types of therapy. My question is what can I do in the meantime to help him with his language & communication skills? I have flash cards, & am aware of the “obvious” things you typically do to teach children. But I feel that I need some fresh ideas, because he doesn’t learn like other children due to his autistic disorder.

admin answers:

Hi:-) I have 2 HFA children. 6 and 4 years of age. Until you get therapy which I know can take forever to get…. You have to require language of him. In other words if you know he knows how to ask for something or if he knows the word for something you need not give in for 1/2 language. Require him to tell you if he knows. No matter what kind of fit you might get. Autistic children can be very resistant to change. The flash cards are great! I would sit with my children and when they were learning basic language and we would do flash cards. Try to be flexible in your approach. If he wants to put the correct ones in a box let him. Or if he wants to hold them let him. Make sure he gets a tangible reward for his cooperation. Also make sure some of the cards he knows to avoid frustration. Talk to him all the time about what things are and what they do even if you do not think he is listening. Take him to open places and pick flowers and tell him what they are. Appeal to his curiosity. There is alot you can do. Be creative. I hope this helps. I have been down this road twice. And still traveling.

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Question?: Autism Signs In Adults

Maria asks…

What would autistic parents teach an autistic child?

Autism is a mutation in the brain, and mutations can be either helpful or harmful (mutations are what brought mankind to where it is today). Suppose for a moment that we all see autism as normal yet different from what is socially normal. How would autistic people live in a society where everyone is also autistic? How would they interact, and what would they teach each other? What would career environments be like? How would homes be built? What would be valued, and what wouldn’t be?

What would the autistic life be like?
This is what I am trying to ask.

I don’t believe autism should be seen as a “disorder” or a handicap but rather a different way of thinking and different behavior.
I read in Times magazine that autistic people have less “grey matter” and more “white matter” in their brains, and that’s why there has to be a mutation in their genes that makes it that way.
And to the person who says that it’s a disorder and that autistic people cannot compete with the rest of society, what I am stating is: what if they didn’t have to compete and had dominance in society?

admin answers:

Autism is NOT a mutation in the brain. When looking at fMRI scans and regular MRI scans, you will NOT find some defining anomoly characteristic of autism.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities. One should keep in mind however, that autism is a spectrum disorder and it affects each individual differently and at varying degrees – this is why early diagnosis is so crucial. By learning the signs, a child can begin benefiting from one of the many specialized intervention programs (see treatment and education).

And you are right, it should not be considered a disorder. It only is due to social standards created today. Austistic people are just different. They use their brain differently, and sometimes very uniquely. Like the Rain Man.

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Question?: Pdd Nos Symptoms

Robert asks…

Can someone please explain Autism to me? My son never lost his memory or language before!?

My three year old is speech and lanuguage delayed. They are testing him for Autism.

admin answers:

“What is Autism? An Overview

Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that typically lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. It is part of a group of disorders known as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Today, 1 in 150 individuals is diagnosed with autism, making it more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. It occurs in all racial, ethnic, and social groups and is four times more likely to strike boys than girls. Autism impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. It is also associated with rigid routines and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessively arranging objects or following very specific routines. Symptoms can range from very mild to quite severe.

Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome. These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the Autism Spectrum Disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise Autism Spectrum Disorder, click here.

Autism Spectrum Disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child’s failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child’s development, don’t wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.”

“Did you know…
1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism
1 in 94 boys is on the autism spectrum
67 children are diagnosed per day
A new case is diagnosed almost every 20 minutes
More children will be diagnosed with autism this year than with AIDS, diabetes & cancer combined
Autism is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the U.S.
Autism costs the nation over $90 billion per year, a figure expected to double in the next decade
Autism receives less than 5% of the research funding of many less prevalent childhood diseases
Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism
There is no medical detection or cure for autism”

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Causes

Michael asks…

what is some current research for rett syndrome?

i’m writing it in my brochure and i can’t find it anywhere!

admin answers:

Here are some great facts! Brochures are great when they are loaded with lots of facts and graphics. Use some of these:

Rett syndrome is a unique developmental disorder that is first recognized in infancy and seen almost always in girls, but can be rarely seen in boys.

Rett syndrome has been most often misdiagnosed as autism, cerebral palsy, or non-specific developmental delay

Rett syndrome is caused by mutations on the X chromosome on a gene called MECP2. There are more than 200 different mutations found on the MECP2 gene. Most of these mutations are found in eight different “hot spots.”

Rett syndrome strikes all racial and ethnic groups, and occurs worldwide in 1 of every 10,000 to 23,000 female births.

Rett syndrome is a developmental disorder. It is not a degenerative disorder.

Rett syndrome causes problems in brain function that are responsible for cognitive, sensory, emotional, motor and autonomic function. These can include learning, speech, sensory sensations, mood, movement, breathing, cardiac function, and even chewing, swallowing, and digestion.

Rett syndrome symptoms appear after an early period of apparently normal or near normal development until six to eighteen months of life, when there is a slowing down or stagnation of skills. A period of regression then follows when she loses communication skills and purposeful use of her hands. Soon, stereotyped hand movements such as handwashing, gait disturbances, and slowing of the normal rate of head growth become apparent. Other problems may include seizures and disorganized breathing patterns while she is awake. In the early years, there may be a period of isolation or withdrawal when she is irritable and cries inconsolably. Over time, motor problems may increase, but in general, irritability lessens and eye contact and communication improve.

Rett syndrome is confirmed with a simple blood test to identify the MECP2 mutation. However, since the MECP2 mutation is also seen in other disorders, the presence of the MECP2 mutation in itself is not enough for the diagnosis of Rett syndrome. Diagnosis requires either the presence of the mutation (a molecular diagnosis) or fulfillment of the diagnostic criteria (a clinical diagnosis, based on signs and symptoms that you can observe) or both.

Rett syndrome can present with a wide range of disability ranging from mild to severe. The course and severity of Rett syndrome is determined by the location, type and severity of her mutation and X-inactivation. Therefore, two girls of the same age with the same mutation can appear quite different.

Rett syndrome presents many challenges, but with love, therapy and assistance, those with the syndrome can benefit from school and community activities well into middle age and beyond. They experience a full range of emotions and show their engaging personalities as they take part in social, educational, and recreational activities at home and in the community.

Good luck in your work! 🙂

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

Paul asks…

Can someone please explain to me in detail what Autism is?

And what the symptoms are? That would be awesome!

admin answers:

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities. One should keep in mind however, that autism is a spectrum disorder and it affects each individual differently and at varying degrees – this is why early diagnosis is so crucial. By learning the signs, a child can begin benefiting from one of the many specialized intervention programs.

Autism is one of five disorders that falls under the umbrella of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD), a category of neurological disorders characterized by “severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development.”

Autism is a spectrum disorder, and although it is defined by a certain set of behaviors, children and adults with autism can exhibit any combination of these behaviors in any degree of severity. Two children, both with the same diagnosis, can act completely different from one another and have varying capabilities.

You may hear different terms used to describe children within this spectrum, such as autistic-like, autistic tendencies, autism spectrum, high-functioning or low-functioning autism, more-abled or less-abled; but more important than the term used to describe autism is understanding that whatever the diagnosis, children with autism can learn and function normally and show improvement with appropriate treatment and education.

Every person with autism is an individual, and like all individuals, has a unique personality and combination of characteristics. Some individuals mildly affected may exhibit only slight delays in language and greater challenges with social interactions. They may have difficulty initiating and/or maintaining a conversation. Their communication is often described as talking at others instead of to them. (For example, monologue on a favorite subject that continues despite attempts by others to interject comments).

People with autism also process and respond to information in unique ways. In some cases, aggressive and/or self-injurious behavior may be present. Persons with autism may also exhibit some of the following traits:

~Insistence on sameness; resistance to change
~Difficulty in expressing needs, using gestures or pointing instead of words
~Repeating words or phrases in place of normal, responsive language
~Laughing (and/or crying) for no apparent reason showing distress for reasons not apparent to others
~Preference to being alone; aloof manner
~Tantrums
~Difficulty in mixing with others
~Not wanting to cuddle or be cuddled
~Little or no eye contact
~Unresponsive to normal teaching methods
~Sustained odd play
~Spinning objects
~Obsessive attachment to objects
~Apparent over-sensitivity or under-sensitivity to pain
~No real fears of danger
~Noticeable physical over-activity or extreme under-activity
~Uneven gross/fine motor skills
~Non responsive to verbal cues; acts as if deaf, although hearing tests in normal range.

For most of us, the integration of our senses helps us to understand what we are experiencing. For example, our sense of touch, smell and taste work together in the experience of eating a ripe peach: the feel of the peach’s skin, its sweet smell, and the juices running down your face. For children with autism, sensory integration problems are common, which may throw their senses off they may be over or under active. The fuzz on the peach may actually be experienced as painful and the smell may make the child gag. Some children with autism are particularly sensitive to sound, finding even the most ordinary daily noises painful. Many professionals feel that some of the typical autism behaviors, like the ones listed above, are actually a result of sensory integration difficulties.

There are also many myths and misconceptions about autism. Contrary to popular belief, many autistic children do make eye contact; it just may be less often or different from a non-autistic child. Many children with autism can develop good functional language and others can develop some type of communication skills, such as sign language or use of pictures. Children do not “outgrow” autism but symptoms may lessen as the child develops and receives treatment.

One of the most devastating myths about autistic children is that they cannot show affection. While sensory stimulation is processed differently in some children, they can and do give affection. However, it may require patience on the parents’ part to accept and give love in the child’s terms.

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Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults Checklist

Betty asks…

How can you tell if you have autism?

Are there any online tests that I can take before I try and talk to a doctor about it?
I’m not looking to self diagnose, I am just looking for answers. I’ve known something was wrong with me since I was little, I just dont know what.
1574 – That describes me almost perfectly. I never look anyone in the eyes, I dont know why it just feels wierd.

I dont talk that much if at all, people make fun of me because of that all the time. I simply say – I have nothing to say, I dont see a reason to talk, and I dont want to.

And it is extremely hard for me to socialize. I dont understand how other people do it, I dont totally understand the point of it, most of it seems fake to me.

And I definatley do things on a sceduel, any deviating off this sceduel will really upset me.
I never really had the option of getting it diagnosed as a child.

In second grade they did try to put me into a remedial class. They made me take an IQ test which I ended up scoring a 135 on blowing that idea of theirs out of the water.

They ended up saying I have ADHD and made me take Ritalin every day…

admin answers:

Do you find yourself confused in social situations?

Are you passionately interested in a single topic?

Is it tough for you to make and maintain eye contact?

Then you, like many talented and intelligent adults, may be diagnosable with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Asperger Syndrome is different from other disorders on the autism spectrum, in part, because it is often diagnosed in older children and adults as opposed to very young children. That’s because Asperger Syndrome is a relatively mild form of ASD which does not include problems with basic language skills. Many people with Asperger Syndrome are very bright and capable. The issues that emerge for people diagnosed with Aspergers are related specifically to social and communication skills — skills that only become signficant as people get older and need to negotiate complex social situations.

The History of Asperger Syndrome
Hans Asperger was a Viennese child psychologist who worked with a group of boys all of whom had similar developmental differences. While they were all intelligent, and had normal language skills, they also had a set of autism-like symptoms. He came up with a description and diagnostic criteria for a syndrome, which he named for himself.

As a result of the second world war, Asperger’s work disappeared for a number of years. When it reappeared in the late 1980’s, it garnered a good deal of interest. Today, Asperger’s Syndrome is in the news virtually every day.

What does it mean to have Asperger’s Syndrome?
Clearly, since so many successful people seem to have the diagnosis (Dan Ackroyd, for one, announced his diagnosis on the air — and rumor has it that Bill Gates may also have Asperger’s) it is not a disability in the classic sense. In fact, some historians suggest that Einstein, Mozart, and Alan Turing (the inventor of the first electronic computer) may all have been diagnosable with Asperger’s.

What people with Asperger’s Syndrome do have in common is a set of characteristics that may make social interaction particularly difficult. Many “aspies” (a term that teens and adults with Asperger’s Syndrome sometimes use to refer to themselves) have been bullied or teased as children. They may be awkward with the opposite sex. And they may have a tough time maneuvering through complex social cues at school, at work, or elsewhere.

The Cambridge Lifespan Asperger Syndrome Service(CLASS), an organization in the United Kingdom that works with adults with Asperger’s has developed a simple ten question checklist to help with a preliminary self-diagnosis. If you answered “yes” to some or most of these questions, you may decide to find out more.

1.) I find social situations confusing.

2.) I find it hard to make small talk.

3.) I did not enjoy imaginative story-writing at school.

4.) I am good at picking up details and facts.

5.) I find it hard to work out what other people are thinking and feeling.

6.) I can focus on certain things for very long periods.

7.) People often say I was rude even when this was not intended.

8.) I have unusually strong, narrow interests.

9.) I do certain things in an inflexible, repetitive way.

10.) I have always had difficulty making friends.

If you do answer “yes” to many of these questions relative to yourself or a loved one, you may have uncovered an undiagnosed case of Asperger’s Syndrome.

For some teens and adults, this is a tremendous relief: it puts a name on a set of issues that has troubled them throughout their lives. And it also opens the door to support, treatment, and community.
But there is no obligation to do anything at all about Asperger’s Syndrome. In fact, many adults feel that being an “aspie” is a point of pride. They are unique, often successful individuals who are simply … themselves!

Check out this link, at the bottom of the page there are several related articles you might be interested in:

http://autism.about.com/od/aspergerssyndrome/a/adultsaspergers.htm

I hope this info helps! I have a relative that has this & he had almost the exact same experience you did in elementary school.

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