Tag Archives: Communication Disorder

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

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Question?: Pdd Symptoms

James asks…

Is there a pyschological condition or symptom that means you are unable to detect sarcasm?

I really am so gulible and cannot understand sarcasm for my life. Its so bad! It even gets me in trouble at school with teachers who use sarcasm and i acually follow through with it and they get very angry at me. At the moment i cant find an example but i hope you understand what im talking about.

I have ADHD, which may contribute to the unable to read facial expressions part but seriously is this a condition?

admin answers:

Yes, there is a DSM-IV-TR condition that is a social communication disorder and makes sarcasm, idioms, puns, reading facial expressions all very difficult. Taking things literally is another classic symptom of a PDD. It is an autistic spectrum disorder that is dx autistic disorder 299.00, asperger’s syndrome 299.80 or PDD.NOS (atypical autism)

ADHD/ADD is considered to be part of the autism spectrum according to many neurologists though the DSM-IV-TR hasn’t been updated and many feel its outdated. These disorders do tend to run together (co-morbidities) and in families.

Sometimes when one dx is made (either ADD/HD, or a PDD which is an autisitc spectrum disorder) the other issues are largely ignored resulting in a late dx.

Http://www.asplanet.info
go under AS symptoms/AQ test

This i find pretty indicative, my score is a 42, over 32 is significant for asperger’s syndrome, and an average female score is 15

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Question?: What Is Autism Video

David asks…

How do you teach students what autism is?

It’s for an A.P. Psychology project. I have to teach the class for 22 minutes and the topic I chose is autism. I was thinking about lecturing, but I can only lecture for so long and don’t think I could for 22 whole minutes. Any ideas?

admin answers:

Do Not show Rain Man. The man, Kim Peek, that character was based on did not have autism. Every autistic person is different and interacts with the world in many different ways. If you have met one autistic child you have met one autistic child. If you want to highlight a real autistic person my suggestion is Temple Grandin. She just made the May 2010 Time magazine top 100 List in Heroes.

Here is an excellent video of Temple presenting at TED

HBO also did a movie about Temple
http://www.hbo.com/movies/temple-grandin/index.html#/movies/temple-grandin/video/trailer.html/eNrjcmbOUM-PSXHMS8ypLMlMDkhMT-VLzE1lzmcu1CzLTEnNh8k45+eVpFaUsDFyMjKySSeWluQX5CRW2pYUlaayMQIAUmYXOA==

She is amazing. Autism is a social and communication disorder and the more people who understand that the better.

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Facilitated communication

Facilitated communication

Facilitated communication (FC) is a method intended to help people with severe neurological impairment to use communication aids with their hands.

In the 1970s, Rosemary Crossley, who worked as an aide in an institution for individuals with multiple disabilities, began working with a woman who had cerebral palsy. She encouraged the woman to communicate by using Ms. Crossley as her facilitator. This was the beginning of the use of Facilitated Communication for people with disabilities, including ASDs.

Advocates of Facilitated Communication believe that autistics have the mental capacity required for communication, but lack the physical capacity to do so. Therefore, they say that if a facilitator supports the autistic’s arm or hand, they are able to type or use other types of boards to communicate. The immediate aim of FC is to allow the user to make choices and to communicate in a way that has been impossible in the past. The ultimate goal of the method is to enable the person to use an augmentative communication device independently.

In 1986, Ms. Crossley founded the DEAL Communication Center in Melbourne, Australia. The Center’s objective is to “assist people without or with dysfunctional speaking abilities to find alternative means of communication.” The prevalent theory at the Center is that autism is not a social or communication disorder, but a physical deficit that prevents communication.

A qualitative study conducted by Biklen in 1990 asserted that 90% of children with autism would be able to communicate using Facilitated Communication and that once they were able to communicate, they would display normal to high intelligence levels. However, other research studies have not been able to duplicate these findings.
People who question the validity of Facilitated Communication, wonder whose thoughts are really being communicated – the facilitator’s or the autistic’s. Is there really any way of knowing whose thoughts are coming through? Even Biklen concurs that the facilitator may be responsible for influencing the communicator.

Research conducted by Wheeler et al. in 1993 reviewed the responses of 12 autistics who used a facilitator. The responses were typed in response to pictures the communicators were familiar with. The conclusion of the research was that there wasn’t just some level of influence, but that the communication was entirely controlled by the facilitators.

Another question brought up by skeptics is how the physical contact made between the facilitator and the communicator enables communication. In 1997, a study conducted by Kezuka used a mechanical device to support the arm rather than a facilitator. The research showed that people who used a mechanical arm were not able to respond to questions without their human facilitator. Proponents of Facilitated Communication contend that the physical contact provides emotional support and forges a bond that gives the individual the confidence to communicate.

Yet, despite the controversies surrounding Facilitated Communication, it has been used in intelligence tests.

Individuals who had previously been tested as severely mentally impaired and later used facilitators tested in the normal range and, based on the testing using a facilitator, have been placed into regular classroom settings. And, Facilitated Communication has also been used within the legal system to provide testimony in criminal, domestic, and custody cases.

In fact, Facilitated Communication has been used as evidence to remove disabled people from homes and to fire staff accused of abuse.
Facilitated Communication has become widely popular since it first came on the scene.
It’s only recently that people have begun to question whether or not the treatment method holds any real scientific value.

Facilitated communication

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View the original article here

Facilitated communication

Facilitated communication

Facilitated communication (FC) is a method intended to help people with severe neurological impairment to use communication aids with their hands.

In the 1970s, Rosemary Crossley, who worked as an aide in an institution for individuals with multiple disabilities, began working with a woman who had cerebral palsy. She encouraged the woman to communicate by using Ms. Crossley as her facilitator. This was the beginning of the use of Facilitated Communication for people with disabilities, including ASDs.

Advocates of Facilitated Communication believe that autistics have the mental capacity required for communication, but lack the physical capacity to do so. Therefore, they say that if a facilitator supports the autistic’s arm or hand, they are able to type or use other types of boards to communicate. The immediate aim of FC is to allow the user to make choices and to communicate in a way that has been impossible in the past. The ultimate goal of the method is to enable the person to use an augmentative communication device independently.

In 1986, Ms. Crossley founded the DEAL Communication Center in Melbourne, Australia. The Center’s objective is to “assist people without or with dysfunctional speaking abilities to find alternative means of communication.” The prevalent theory at the Center is that autism is not a social or communication disorder, but a physical deficit that prevents communication.

A qualitative study conducted by Biklen in 1990 asserted that 90% of children with autism would be able to communicate using Facilitated Communication and that once they were able to communicate, they would display normal to high intelligence levels. However, other research studies have not been able to duplicate these findings.
People who question the validity of Facilitated Communication, wonder whose thoughts are really being communicated – the facilitator’s or the autistic’s. Is there really any way of knowing whose thoughts are coming through? Even Biklen concurs that the facilitator may be responsible for influencing the communicator.

Research conducted by Wheeler et al. in 1993 reviewed the responses of 12 autistics who used a facilitator. The responses were typed in response to pictures the communicators were familiar with. The conclusion of the research was that there wasn’t just some level of influence, but that the communication was entirely controlled by the facilitators.

Another question brought up by skeptics is how the physical contact made between the facilitator and the communicator enables communication. In 1997, a study conducted by Kezuka used a mechanical device to support the arm rather than a facilitator. The research showed that people who used a mechanical arm were not able to respond to questions without their human facilitator. Proponents of Facilitated Communication contend that the physical contact provides emotional support and forges a bond that gives the individual the confidence to communicate.

Yet, despite the controversies surrounding Facilitated Communication, it has been used in intelligence tests.

Individuals who had previously been tested as severely mentally impaired and later used facilitators tested in the normal range and, based on the testing using a facilitator, have been placed into regular classroom settings. And, Facilitated Communication has also been used within the legal system to provide testimony in criminal, domestic, and custody cases.

In fact, Facilitated Communication has been used as evidence to remove disabled people from homes and to fire staff accused of abuse.
Facilitated Communication has become widely popular since it first came on the scene.
It’s only recently that people have begun to question whether or not the treatment method holds any real scientific value.

Facilitated communication

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Facilitated communication

View the original article here

Autistic Child Speech – Symptoms and Treatment For Autism and Its Communication Disorder

Autistic Child Speech

Children provided autism syndrome have a lack of effective communication skills, therefore inhibiting lifelong social skills. Parents who understand what to be on the look for at an the first part of age can increase the chances for their child to reside a slightly ordinary livlihood. All children learn at their own pace, therefore making it difficult to diagnose at infancy. Infants a few months of age will typically start to babble, imitating the sounds it hears around him. Autistic Child Speech

While every baby develops speech at a different rate the following is a guide for the average child. At one year, can use negative phrases such as “No, want”, can imitate animal sounds and noises, and says four to six simple words. At 18 months can say 10 to 15 words and can make two word sentences (i.e., “Daddy up”) At 2 has a vocabulary of about 100 words and asks, “What is?” The autistic child on the other hand does not develop at this normal rate and has a difficult time building his/her vocabulary.

There might only be a few words they understand or respond to. They might not speak at all; half of the people diagnosed with autism never learn to speak A more comprehensible clue for an autistic child is the skewed verbal cues they might respond to. For example: Pointing at a red car and stating, “look at the red car”. The autistic child will become fixated more on your finger pointing at the red car than the actual point of interest. An autistic child will have a difficult time making his/her wants and needs known and will more than likely point at something he/she wants rather than using words to describe it Autistic Child Speech

The inability to verbalize his/her thoughts affects the imaginative play, making it difficult to have cooperative play with other children. Even if an autistic child does develop speech he /she has a difficult time holding or starting a conversation due to the inability to understand facial cues, sarcasm and the use of humor and will likely understand it in the literal sense. A child with autism will repeat phrases over and over again and will often mimic others speech. Autistic Child Speech

Working with autistic children’s communication skills prior to the age of two will prevent the skills atrophy. Intensive therapy at an early age can decrease many of the communication problems that autistic children face and may enable them to attain a near average capability. Epilepsy and associated seizure disorders are common with autistic children that haven’t been diagnosed prior to the age of two. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Child Speech program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Child Speech is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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The Difference Between Asperger’s Syndrome and Autism

According to the DSM-IV classifications asperger’s syndrome and autism are two separate disorders. There is debate however because aspergers and autism exhibit some of the same symptoms. The argument is that aspergers is a form an autism and should not be listed as a separate entity when diagnosing the disorder or when devising treatment. The argument relies on the idea that since there is no distinct criteria for either disorder and they are both persuasive developmental disorders they should be treated the same.

The argument about name is not just an argument on syntax, but an argument for services and label. The services for an autistic child are far more extended than a child diagnosed with asperger’s syndrome. The group that wants to keep the labels different look at the argument from a research based idea. They want to see both syndromes separate because research and treatment will follow two different paths and the benefits of one path might bleed over to the other. This way is there is a break through in asperger’s syndrome, that break through may help the autistic child.

According to the DSM-IV the diagnosis for both disorders are very similar. The clinicians who diagnosis the patient looks at the severity of the symptoms and diagnose on the severity of certain symptoms and the lack of severity in others. This gives the doctor some leeway in the diagnoses but also leads to the idea that the diagnoses is not a stringent as it appears or needs to be. The DSM-IV proponents argue that there needs to be more criteria in the guidelines for both disorders in order to make a correct diagnosis and a correct treatment plan.

The major distinction that now can be read from the manual is that autism, a communication disorder, does not allow the child to communicate normally. This is different in an asperger’s child because the asperger’s child may not understand the communication that is presented to them. The autistic child understands but is not able to neither respond to the communication nor give the proper response that is socially acceptable. With an entire list of specifications for the disorder, it is sketchy that this one ill defined symptom can be the separating point.

Another sticky difference between the disorders is the patient’s ability to have an average intelligence. Some autistic children are mentally retarded. Though not all, some have met the criteria that their IQ is below the measured rating of mental retardation which is 69. The asperger’s child cannot be diagnosed with the disorder if they have IQ with is 69 points or lower. Most asperger’s children have average to above average intelligences. This is another argument. How many children that have asperger’s syndrome are diagnosed as autistic just because they have a score that labels them as mentally retarded? There is room for a lot of misdiagnosis and because of that there are a lot of children that are in the wrong treatment programs.

If you are a parent of an autistic child that has a below average IQ, you might want to look in to petitioning the diagnosis if the programs for as asperger’s syndrome child is more beneficial for your child. Just because your child has the diagnosis of autism, the case can be reviewed and with time and patience, you can find a team that will make an alternative diagnoses.

To learn about early signs of autism and mild autism, visit Autism Diagnosis.
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Teaching Communication Skills to a Child Diagnosed With Asperger’s Syndrome

Asperger’s Syndrome is a milder variant of Autistic Disorder. In Asperger’s Disorder, affected individuals are characterized by social isolation and eccentric behavior in childhood. Though grammatical, their speech is peculiar due to abnormalities of inflection and a repetitive pattern. They usually have a circumscribed area of interest which usually leaves no space for more age appropriate, common interests. Some examples are cars, trains, door knobs, hinges. The name “Asperger” comes from Hans Asperger, an Austrian physician who first described the syndrome in 1944.

If a child is showing symptoms of Asperger’s Disorder because highly visual thinking is interfering with the ability to generate language fluently then we may have child who is suffering from a very trainable communication disorder rather than a psychiatric disease.

Children who are highly visual with communication problems can have as many as 50 symptoms that are very similar and predictable. I call these children Maverick Minds.

To begin working on improving language and communication, we start with teaching visual attention skills.

In my consulting practice I teach parents methods for improving attention, memory and communication skills to replace many of the off-target behaviors they have.

Before we begin teaching attention we do an evaluation to determine if the child is naturally turning to visual attention and memory skills rather than the auditory-verbal counterparts.

When I build exercises to teach attention I use the natural strengths of each child so that each exercise is easy, fun, and successful because it is critical that emerging communication abilities feel natural and flow fluently. To see my examples of children learning to become symptom-free go to my ebrainlabs website and watch the videos in our video viewing studio. You will see parents y using a pace and methods that result in success. The goals of the exercises are to help your child improve daily and achieve at least 80% success consistently.

We evaluate the “just-right” difficulty level to begin the exercise so that we understand how your child learns best. There are only two rules for the pace of learning:

•You and your child should be having lots of fun.

•Your child should always be 80% correct or better.

In our seminars, we discuss how we build the visual attention system first because it is the stronger system and is often shutting down verbal development. For this reason we begin our training with very little talking, which is one step toward stopping the antagonism between the visual and verbal systems and initiate a supportive relationship. Thus, we want you to minimize your talking during the exercises. As a

result, your child will be able to isolate the visual attention system and begin to load

visual memory. The more you talk, the more you reduce visual memory capacity. So by talking during this training, you could reduce your child’s capacity from 200 data bytes to 25.

As you work, you’ll establish a tri-level sequencer. The sequencer is another important

brain function that is the engine of the verbal thinking pathway and the most underused component of verbal biology. The sequencer is often very painful for autistic children so initially you teach it as a “treat,” or what feels like a reward.

The parts of the sequencer are:

Continuous – After every correct answer, ping a penny into a cup. Feedback that occurs after every correct answer facilitates rapid learning.

Fixed-ratio – After every three pennies, give your child a treat such as a sticker, a raisin, or a chocolate chip. Fixed-ratio sequencers begin the process of self control.

Variable – At the end of your session, go on a treasure hunt with your child. Hide clues around the house that lead to a surprise under the pillow. Varying the elements of the treasure hunt helps your child transfer learning and generalize it to daily life.

As you work, you’ll begin to vary your sequencers to increase the flexibility of this component of training. After you have used pennies, raisins and a treasure hunt, for example, you might change to printing out a picture of a desired toy and cutting it into pieces. Then, you can have your child earn pennies, stickers, and then a piece of the puzzle. Tape the piece on the wall. When the picture is complete, go to the store to buy the toy.

You can also vary the elements of each part of the sequencer, depending on your child’s needs. For example, you could change the Continuous to macaroni, marbles, poker chips, or small post-it notes. You could change the Fixed Ratio to tickles, chocolate chips, pretzels, stickers, or nickels. Or you might change the Variable to

coupons for privileges. The goal is to keep your child interested and challenged, and to have lots of fun.

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Learn more by calling 1-866-865-9820 or emailing me at support@cheriflorance.com

Cheri L. Florance, Ph.D. is a world renowned expert on the brain and communication. Dr. Florance has doctoral degrees in Speech and Hearing Science and Psychology, and a 5 year post doctoral degree in Brain Science from the National Institutes of Health. Her scientific achievements have been recognized by The White House, US Office of Education and US Rehabilitation Commission. She has been interviewed by Oprah, on the cover of USA Today and featured in numerous articles and television shows.
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Autism Parent Training – 2 Autism Screening Tools That Every Parent Should Know About!

Autism Parent Training

In 2007 the Center for Disease Control’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDM) discovered which 1 in 150 8 year olds in different features of the nation hold an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Years ago autism was declared to crop up in 4 to 5 per 10,000. This means that the prevalence of autism has increased to epidemic levels in the persist a large amount of years. This is the reason why most any parent needs to be educated around autism screening tools, in case their child is showing signs of autism. Autism Parent Training

This article will discuss 2 autism screening tools the I provide are many effective in diagnosing autism. Autism is a complex developmental disability that usually appears during the first three years of a child’s life. It is defined by a unique set of behaviors and is considered a “spectrum disorder.” What this means is that a child can have different symptoms that go across a spectrum. Autism is often diagnosed by physicians, health care workers, or special education personnel.

Two effective screening tools to diagnose autism are the CHAT which stands for the Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, and the CARS which stands for the Childhood Autism Rating Scale. Both will be discussed now, as well as who can use these tools to diagnose autism.

1. CHAT Checklist for Autism in Toddlers is a short questionnaire which is filled out by the parents and a primary health care worker (usually the child’s Doctor). The CHAT is recommended to be given to all children at their 18 month check up. The Chat consists of two sections: the first nine items are questions answered by the parents and the last five items are observations made by the primary health care worker. These items look at behaviors which if absent at 18 months, put a child at risk for a social-communication disorder. These behaviors are: a. joint attention, including pointing to show and looking to where a parent is pointing, and b. pretend play. The items are then scored, and a determination of pass or fail is given. Children who fail are rescreened in one month, and if they fail again should be referred to a specialty Dr. or Clinic for further testing. Autism Parent Training

2. CARS Childhood Autism Rating Scale is a 15 item behavior Rating Scale that helps to identify children with Autism and to distinguish them from other children with a disability. Professionals such as physicians, special educators (after age 3), school psychologists, speech pathologists and audiologists who have had only minimal exposure to Autism, can easily be trained to use the CARS. This is one of the reasons that I like it so much, it does not take lengthy training before use.

Each of the 15 items covers a particular characteristic, ability, or behavior. The person performing the CARS will ask the parents questions. based on the 15 items. The parents answers will be used to give the child a score. Children who score above a given point are categorized as having autism. The CARS also gives a determination if the child has mild, moderate, or severe autism, based on the child’s score on the CARS.

This is a wonderful bonus for parents because it helps them understand what their child’s needs are related to having autism. By understanding what effective autism screening tools are available, parents will be able to ask their Doctor to use one of the screening tools, if they are concerned. If your child fails either of these tests, you should take them to a specialty clinic or physician, who is experienced in treating children with autism.

They should order a complete battery of tests to determine what your child’s strengths and weaknesses are, as well as what special education services they need. Do not take these screening tools in lieu of further testing, but it will help you get started. Good Luck! Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Autism Parent Training program now!

Autism Parent Training is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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