Tag Archives: Child Autism

Question?: Autism Signs In Toddler Girls

Mary asks…

does autism get better?

My toddler who is 3 yrs old and 5 months is finally talking a little bit, she says “come on, baby up, all done, juice, candy, eat it, and things like that but its rare. Shes coming around really slow. its seems that now that Ive got her to talk a little, shes now rebellious! She wont drink out of her sippy cup, she wants a big girl cup and i have to stand and supervise her everytime she drinks; otherwise, she will spill it all on the floor. she also stopped using her spoon, she pushes it away and says “nope” and shed rather eat with her hands.
I wonder if it has something to do with the 1000iu of vitamin D3 I have her on. Since i put her on vitamin d3 she started to talk a whole lot but she lost her skills of using her spoon and cup, well she uses the open top regular cup just fine….anyway I want to know if your kid has regressed. Before u assume, she doesnt have rett syndrome or anything else, ive had her fragilex test done so its definately autism

admin answers:

I think the ages 2-6 are the most difficult when it comes to a child with autism , It is also the most important time to have your child in a early intervention program. I would not recommend giving vitamins or a special diet to a child unless it is under a Dr,’s care . It is really good that your child is starting to talk. My son did not tale in sentences until 5 years old. However he would repeat words he heard. It was not functional speech .I think some of the behaviors you described reminds me of a typical 2 year old. Trying to exert Independence and do things her way. It is a good sign, not bad. Offer a spoon at each meal , she will use it again. It is really good she wants to be “a big girl” by using a regular cup. My son did regress , but he was younger then your daughter. Most of it was speech related I really think your daughter is starting to test you and see how much she can do all by herself, these are all very good signs.
Autism is a developmental disability , a child does not always “catch up” with this disability.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Infants

George asks…

What are the symptoms of a child with autism?

how do you know your child is autistic?

admin answers:

If your baby otherwise seems to be growing and developing normally, then that is probably not a sign of autism. Among other normal developmental milestones that you would expect at this age include that your baby smiles, is usually comforted or soothed when she is picked up, follows objects past the midline of her face, make ‘ooo’ and ‘aah’ type cooing noises, and maybe has begun laughing. You should definitely discuss it with your Pediatrician if you don’t think your baby’s behavior is normal though.

The symptoms you describe could also be seen in infants with high muscle tone, especially if her muscles usually seem extra stiff. This is something that you should also discuss with your Pediatrician, but it isn’t really related to autism at all.

Among the early signs and symptoms that parents and Pediatricians look for to alert them that a child needs further evaluation for autism include:

* not smiling by six months of age
* not babbling, pointing or using other gestures by 12 months
* not using single words by age 16 months
* not using two word phrases by 24 months
* having a regression in development, with any loss of language or social skills

Infants with autism might also avoid eye contact, and as they get older, act as if they are unaware of when people come and go around them, as you can see in this autism screening quiz.

Keep in mind that autism usually isn’t diagnosed until about age 3, although some experts believe that some children begin to show subtle signs as early as six months of age.

There is also an autism study that showed that some children with autism had abnormal brain growth. Specifically, they had a smaller than average head size at birth (at the 25th percentile), but then had a period of rapid head growth during which their head size moved up to the 84th percentile by age 6-14 months. But rapid head growth is not a sign in all kids with autism.

In general, if you are concerned about your child’s development, especially if you think that they might have autism, you should talk to your Pediatrician and consider a more formal developmental evaluation.

And keep in mind that when a child arches her back a lot, it can be a sign of gastroesophageal reflux (Sandifer Syndrome), although you would usually expect other symptoms, like spitting up and being fussy.
Getting An Evaluation
One of the frustrating things that occurs when parents think something is wrong with their child’s development is that they may be told ‘not to worry’ or that they ‘should just wait.’ Experts think that it is better for parents to trust their instincts and get their child evaluated if they think that they aren’t developing normally. This guide from First Signs is a good resource for parents trying to share their concerns with their Pediatrician.

Your local early childhood development program may also be able to do an evaluation if you are concerned about your child’s development.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Angry Autistic Child

Lisa asks…

How to handle a child with autism?

I have a little boy that goes to my church that is 5 years old. He has autism. I am asked by his grandmother to watch him ALOT. He always runs away or misbehaves and i have no training in this type of disease. How do you communicate and talk to kids with autism?
As I said in this question, I know NOTHING about autism. I don’t mean to affend in any way

admin answers:

First of all i have a child with autism and its not a disease and as a parent with a child with autism you just offened me its a devlopmetl disabilty please dont put it that way

in my words it would be like 100 pages i found a good list for you

Social management
Behavioural management
Scholastic management

Autism is a communication disorder characterised by a child’s inability to relate to the outside world – physically and emotionally. These children are usually hypersensitive to external environmental stimuli and seem to be withdrawn into an inside world only they have access to. In such a situation, autistic children need special and individualised care from their parents and other caregivers. Here are some guidelines to help deal with an autistic child’s needs.

Social management:

Try to make eye contact with the child.

Organise the child’s environment and daily activities into a routine. Autistic children respond well to routine, which helps them to create order in their world. This could be done by keeping fixed times for food, play and other activities like taking a bath, sleeping, etc.

Provide prior warning of any change in routine – physical or otherwise. For example, if the furniture of the child’s room needs to be moved, the child should be told and allowed to get used to the idea, before the change is made.

Getting angry at the child’s tantrum will not help. In such a case, it is better to allow the child to calm down and then repeat the instructions.

Taking the child to crowded places should be avoided, at least till behavioural therapy has made him more accepting of such outings.

Behavioural management:

Talk to the child in simple and uncomplicated language. Long and subtle sentences should be avoided. For example, instead of saying, “Rahul, would you please come and sit here”, it is better to say, “Rahul, sit here” while pointing to the destination with a finger.

Touch the child often. Though an autistic child will frequently rebuff any effort to touch, research has shown that they begin to respond to touch sooner or later. Instead of making overt efforts to touch the child, a parent should try to make subtle advances like lead the child by holding the arm lightly, or a gentle nudge from behind etc.

The child should be talked to often, rather than waiting for him to initiate conversation. Any effort to talk on the child’s part should be effusely praised. Gradually the child can be encouraged to initiate conversation on his own.

Taking the child’s name every time he is addressed is essential. However, pronouns should be taken care of while talking to him since most autistic children who talk tend to reverse pronouns, using “You” instead of “I” and vice versa. So it may be better to say, “Rahul, YOU can have toast”, rather than “Rahul can have toast”.

It is better to ensure consistency in discipline and demands since autistic children tend to take everything literally. Once a limit or target has been set, it is better to adhere to it at that time. For example, if the time for play has been set for 4 o clock and the parent wants to postpone it, it is better to tell the child, “Rahul we will play at 5”, rather than saying, “We will do that later”.

Scholastic management:

Use visual media as far as possible with background auditory stimuli. For example, while telling a story, the child should preferably be shown a picture book simultaneously. Unlike other children, an autistic child might like to hear the same story everyday providing him with a sense of routine and order.

Give clear, simple and literal tasks to a child to complete and let him finish it before moving on to another activity.

Do not rush the child into keeping pace with others.

The teaching material may be increased in complexity with time.

The child should be encouraged to interact with peers.

Positive reinforcement should be given if the child makes eye contact, speaks, completes an activity or curbs repetitive behaviour. Praise should be effusive. For example., say “Rahul that was excellent. You have done well”, instead of “That was good”.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism Yahoo

Maria asks…

Looking for parents who have recovering children from autism ?

I’m looking for other parents who have went through recovering thier child from autism any help is greatly appreciated. Also, if any parents are in phx, arizona that would help a lot with any local sources out here thanks.

admin answers:

YES, children can and have recovered! To Duck, sorry if you choose to be bugged by that statement, but it is true. While I agree with Duck that “You can only do your best with what your given”, part of what your given are other’s who have gone before you and come out the other side. I’ve met several kids who have recovered. I don’t know what their brain scans look like, but by standard diagnostic Autism testing (e.g., ADOS-WS), they appear nowhere on the autism spectrum. Here is a link to some wonderful free archived web seminars:
http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/webinar/index.php
Note: Raun Kaufman who recovered in the 1970’s is on this. Brian Nelson who’s son recovered is on this. Also, William Hogan who’s daughter recovered is on this. Jade Hogan’s Recovery Video: http://video.yahoo.com/watch/109310/1702951 21 minute video spans from on-set (solitary life) to recovery (talking on the phone, playing T-Ball, etc.)

Oprah Winfrey and Richard Sher on “People Are Talking” {from 1981} interviewed Barry Neil Kaufman on how he helped his child, Raun, recover from Autism. They discuss the importance of never giving up hope. The Kaufmans later went on to found the Autism Treatment Center of America where their son Raun, recovered from Autism, is now the CEO. If the Kaufmans had listen to the many doctors that they consulted, Raun would be in an institution right now…instead, Raun has been one of the best teachers that I have ever had.

Clip 1 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8uJ5RpQWw0

Clip 2 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QshJhrPBPHM

Clip 3 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmsrBoqoh8I

Clip 4 of 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwKzM64rTJY

For about 3 years, our daughter who has autism was in special needs preschool with ABA with PECS. This did not work for her. Two years ago we started Son-Rise as our relationship based teaching modality. Within the first 5 months, her 3-hour tantrums were gone; she was potty trained, her eye contact had grown exponentially, she started speaking some sentences, and best of all, she was happy!

We have also started complementary bio medical interventions with even further results. Recovery is possible, and dramatic improvement is fairly commonplace amongst other Son-Rise parents that I have talked to. You may want to check out Jonathan Levy’s book, What You Can Do Right Now to Help Your Child With Autism (http://www.amazon.com/What-Right-Help-Child-Autism/dp/1402209185/ref=sr_1_1/103-7291337-5129403?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1179939405&sr=8-1).
We LOVE this book!!!
Remember to trust yourself…not just doctors and therapists. Often their ASD training is limited and you have a PhD in knowing your child.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism Video

Joseph asks…

Things you can give a Clinical Psychologist for Autism?

In regards to give a little more information to a clinical psychologist in regards to observation. Of course the main importance is them coming to observe the child for Autism, but can sending them videos of what you’ve recorded also work on top of the observation? Cause I want him to have every aspect of my son as possible. Good idea? Bad idea?

admin answers:

It could not hurt sending them a video of what happens at home. A clinician is with a child a short period of time during a day, week, or month.

Sometimes seeing is believing. You may also want to write a journal.

-What time of the day you see a concern?
-How long does it last for?
-Is the child tired, hungry, wet, upset, and other things that might be following a behavioral change.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Signs In 3 Year Olds

Donald asks…

Anyone out there have a child with autism?

I am so worried that my 3 year old son has some kind of form of autism. His dr. wants him to be evaluated. Could someone out there tell me what life is like having a child with autism, and how did you first know something was out of the norm with them?

admin answers:

My nephew is autistic, and i believe he was dignosed about the age of 3. He is an extreme case. He is now 5. He still talks very little, and he has a lot of difficulty with change. For example, he has pinkeye right now, and it has been a madhouse here just trying to get eyedrops in his eyes.

He is very bright, however. He is very stubborn, and cries for hours on end if he doesn’t get his way. He is not antisocial, but has a lot of trouble sharing things like toys. He sometimes daydreams so deeply that even loud noises don’t shake him from them. He seems to function rather well most of the time. Just doesn’t deal well with things he’s not used to. He picks up on some things faster than most kids. Like the fact that he no longer calls his mother mommy. He calls her by her first name, because that is what we all call her.

He sees a speech therapist and and an occupational therapist, and it was his OT that originally pointed out signs. He said the first clue was that when he looked at something new, he held it close to his face and wiggled his fingers on it. Sometimes he just waves his fingers in front of his face like he’s holding something we can’t see. Another sign (or so his mother tells me) is that he seems to “talk” in his own language. Seems like babble to me, but he also seems to have his own certain words or noises from certain things.

May not be a lot of help in your own situation, but this is what I have observed.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Signs In Adults

Maria asks…

What would autistic parents teach an autistic child?

Autism is a mutation in the brain, and mutations can be either helpful or harmful (mutations are what brought mankind to where it is today). Suppose for a moment that we all see autism as normal yet different from what is socially normal. How would autistic people live in a society where everyone is also autistic? How would they interact, and what would they teach each other? What would career environments be like? How would homes be built? What would be valued, and what wouldn’t be?

What would the autistic life be like?
This is what I am trying to ask.

I don’t believe autism should be seen as a “disorder” or a handicap but rather a different way of thinking and different behavior.
I read in Times magazine that autistic people have less “grey matter” and more “white matter” in their brains, and that’s why there has to be a mutation in their genes that makes it that way.
And to the person who says that it’s a disorder and that autistic people cannot compete with the rest of society, what I am stating is: what if they didn’t have to compete and had dominance in society?

admin answers:

Autism is NOT a mutation in the brain. When looking at fMRI scans and regular MRI scans, you will NOT find some defining anomoly characteristic of autism.

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and leisure or play activities. One should keep in mind however, that autism is a spectrum disorder and it affects each individual differently and at varying degrees – this is why early diagnosis is so crucial. By learning the signs, a child can begin benefiting from one of the many specialized intervention programs (see treatment and education).

And you are right, it should not be considered a disorder. It only is due to social standards created today. Austistic people are just different. They use their brain differently, and sometimes very uniquely. Like the Rain Man.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thomas asks…

How do you know if a child has mild autism ?

My friend has a 5 yr old son who can say a few words then cuts of into bable. She doesn’t talk “baby talk” to him. When she wants to get his attention he avoids eye contact by rolling his eyes in every direction. When we took him to the fair certain noise would bother him and he would cover his ears. The noise didn’t even have to be high pitched or very loud. When she asked the doctor about his speech, he simply said it was a speech impediment that once he starts school he will get help for it. I’m not sure how to approach her about it either.

admin answers:

DON’T WAIT UNTIL HE STARTS SCHOOL!

Early intervention is key in cases of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Nonverbal Learning Disorder, and delayed speech.

Please ask her to take the following steps immediately:

Find a pediatrician that specializes in children with developmental disabilities.

Contact the school system for a complete evaluation (this is free, and could have been before the child trained 3!).

The school system will choose a team of professionals to evaluate the child, including, but not limited to a speech therapist, an occupational therapist, a physical therapist, a school adjustment counselor, a school psychologist, a teacher and an expert in special education. His parents will be part of the team, and they may bring any experts they so choose to the team meetings.

The child’s new pediatrician will submit a recommendation for the services the child needs. The child may require an independent evaluation by additional specialists (pediatric neurologist, etc. To develop a treatment plan.

Make sure that the team adopts the recommendations of his pediatrician and specialists in their entirety; appeal the team’s decision, if necessary.

The team will develop an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies the services to be provided and the frequency of the provision, as well as the modifications that will be made to “regular” education to accommodate him.

His parents have the right to accept or reject the IEP, in whole or in part, and appeal same, in whole or in part. If they choose to appeal and another, independent evaluation is required, the school must pay for the evaluation.

The school system is required BY LAW to provide early intervention services beginning at age 3, so he will probably begin in a special program, immediately.

This is a very complex subject not easily dealt with in this forum, however the above is a start. DON’T WAIT!

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Adults

Donald asks…

How can you tell if some one has autism?

What are the symptoms?

admin answers:

Autism – Symptoms
Core symptoms
The severity of symptoms varies greatly between individuals, but all people with autism have some core symptoms in the areas of:

Social interactions and relationships. Symptoms may include:
Significant problems developing nonverbal communication skills, such as eye-to-eye gazing, facial expressions, and body posture.
Failure to establish friendships with children the same age.
Lack of interest in sharing enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people.
Lack of empathy. People with autism may have difficulty understanding another person’s feelings, such as pain or sorrow.
Verbal and nonverbal communication. Symptoms may include:
Delay in, or lack of, learning to talk. As many as 40% of people with autism never speak.1
Problems taking steps to start a conversation. Also, people with autism have difficulties continuing a conversation after it has begun.
Stereotyped and repetitive use of language. People with autism often repeat over and over a phrase they have heard previously (echolalia).
Difficulty understanding their listener’s perspective. For example, a person with autism may not understand that someone is using humor. They may interpret the communication word for word and fail to catch the implied meaning.
Limited interests in activities or play. Symptoms may include:
An unusual focus on pieces. Younger children with autism often focus on parts of toys, such as the wheels on a car, rather than playing with the entire toy.
Preoccupation with certain topics. For example, older children and adults may be fascinated by video games, trading cards, or license plates.
A need for sameness and routines. For example, a child with autism may always need to eat bread before salad and insist on driving the same route every day to school.
Stereotyped behaviors. These may include body rocking and hand flapping.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers

Question?: What Is Autism For Kids

Linda asks…

What do you think causes autism in kids?

If it’s not vaccines, is it the water kids drink, the food they eat, poor diet, what? What‘s your spin on it? Also, does anyone know when symptoms generally become apparent? This issue is freaking me out.
Thanks.

admin answers:

Thomas in my eyes was born with autism if it was the vaccine every child would have autism even Thomas’s twin sister Kylie would, i think its in the genes and if there are many cases of mental illness in your families then i believe its a factor, if i went back through my families history some members has certain traits of autism and when it come to children like my son Thomas they get it all at once

Powered by Yahoo! Answers