Tag Archives: Checklist Form

Question?: Pdd Autism

Paul asks…

What is Autism exactly-I have an autistic sister?

I would like to understand her situation better. I don’t live with her so when ever I do see her (which is like maybe once every 5 months, if that) she’s a little hard to handle. She’s very hyper. And she’s got more problems other than just autism.

But what is autism exactly? I just want to understand my baby sister more.

admin answers:

Autism is a severe developmental disorder that begins at birth or within the first two-and-a-half years of life. Most autistic children are perfectly normal in appearance, but spend their time engaged in puzzling and disturbing behaviors which are markedly different from those of typical children. Less severe cases may be diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or with Asperger’s Syndrome (these children typically have normal speech, but they have many “autistic” social and behavioral problems).

It used to be thought that autism is just a fate that you accept.The good news is that there are now a wide variety of treatment options which can be very helpful. Some treatments may lead to great improvement, and others may have little or no effect, but a good starting point would be the parent ratings of biomedical interventions, which presents the responses of over 25,000 parents in showing the effectiveness of various interventions on their own child.

ARI’s Diagnostic Checklist, Form E-2, was developed by Dr. Bernard Rimland to diagnose children with Kanner’s syndrome (which is also known as ‘classical autism’). Many parents and professionals have also used the E-2 checklist to assist in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can print out, complete the checklist, and then mail it to ARI for scoring. Our staff will analyze the responses and send you a score along with an interpretation. The checklist is available in 17 different languages. There is no charge for this service.

How Common is it? For many years autism was rare – occurring in just five children per 10,000 live births. However, since the early 1990’s, the rate of autism has increased exponentially around the world with figures as high as 60 per 10,000. Boys outnumber girls four to one. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control reported that 1 in 150 children is diagnosed with autism.

What is the Outlook? Age at intervention has a direct impact on outcome–typically, the earlier a child is treated, the better the prognosis will be. In recent years there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children who can attend school in a typical classroom and live semi-independently in community settings. However, the majority of autistic persons remain impaired in their ability to communicate and socialize.

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Question?: Pdd-nos Checklist

Michael asks…

Autism & potty training….?

I’ve recently come to the realization that my almost 4 year old son might be autistic (mild to moderate). I am having the WORST time trying to potty train him (over the past year). He just flat out refuses, throws tantrums when I ask if he wants to go on the potty, and if I take him in there and sit him down he cries like he is afraid of it. Is there a link between autism & potty training? I mean, could he be so dead-set against it because he is possibly autistic (& afraid) or is he just being really stubborn?

Sorry if this seems like a silly question. I can’t figure out why he’s so afraid of the potty and after coming to realize that he’s possibly autistic, I was just wondering if there’s a connection.

Also, if any one can give me an insight on what’s to come after he is formally diagnosed…such as therapies & stuff like that; it would be greatly appreciated.

Also, what is the “test” to diagnose autism? Will they have to draw blood, give him a CAT scan or anything like that? I would just like to be prepared.

Thanks again.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=ArzE9qXlFQkZwcGn8nymjnHsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20081114094128AAIcMni

Here is a question I asked a few days ago. It lists SOME of the reasons why I believe he might have autism.

All I asked was if there was potty training issues with mild to moderate autistic children.

He has a doctor’s appointment on the 29th.

admin answers:

Autism is diagnosed based on clinical observation and testing by a professional using one or more standardized tests. Professionals most likely to diagnose autism are psychologists, psychiatrists, developmental pediatricians, and school psychologists. Some of the screenings and tests which may be used in the diagnostic process are: CARS (Childhood Autism Rating Scale), Autism Diagnostic Checklist Form E-2, CHAT (Checklist for Autism in Toddlers), M-CHAT (Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers), Pervasive Developmental Disorders Screening Test -2, ADOS (Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale), and ADI-R (Autism Diagnostic Interview – Revised).

In addition, parental interview and medical history are taken into consideration.

The current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) has specific criterion required to make a diagnosis of autism, or a Pervasive Development Disorder.

There are five disorders under the PDD umbrella which include Autism, Aspergers, Rhett’s Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and PDD-NOS (not otherwise specified).

The diagnosis of autism may be made when a specified number of characteristics listed in the DSM-IV are present.

CRITERIA
A. A total of at least six items from (1), (2), and (3), with at least two from (1), and one each from (2) and (3):

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction.
Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest)
lack of social or emotional reciprocity
Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:
delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level
Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole body movements)
persistent preoccupation with parts of objects
B. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years: (1) social interaction, (2) language as used in social communication, or (3) symbolic or imaginative play.

C. The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett’s Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.

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