Tag Archives: Centers For Disease Control

CDC Data and Statistics that you may not know.

Hi, We have a new volunteer. Our first. Elizabeth Campion,  from the Shelby Township library here in Michigan. She is an expert at mining data, She did this as a sample of her work. Even I had not heard all these facts. I thank her for this work.

 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION                                             DATA AND STATISTICS

 

AUTISM

About one in 88 children has been identified with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) according to estimates from CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network.

ASD’s are reported to occur in all racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups.

ASD’s are almost five times more common among boys (1 in54) than among girls (1 in 252).

Studies in Asia, Europe, and North America have identified individuals with an ASD with an average prevalence of about 1%.  A recent study in South Korea reported a prevalence of 2.6%.

About one in 6 children in the U.S. had a developmental disability in 2006-2008, ranging from mild disabilities such as speech and language impairments to serious developmental disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, cerebral palsy, and autism.

 

RISK FACTORS AND CHARACTERISTICS

Studies have shown that among identical twins, if one child has an ASD, then the other will be affected about 36-95% of the time.  In non-identical twins, if one child has an ASD, then the other is affected about 0-31% of the time.

Parents who have a child with an ASD have a 2-18% chance of having a second child who is also affected.

ASDs tend to occur more often in people who have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions.  About 10% of children with autism are also identified as having Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, tubers sclerosis, and other genetic and chromosomal disorders.

The majority (62%) of children the ADDM Network identified as having ASDs did not have intellectual disability.

Children born to older parents are at a higher risk for ASDs.

A small percentage of children who are born prematurely or with low birth weight are at greater risk for having ASDs.

ASD commonly co-occurs with other developmental, psychiatric, neurologic, chromosomal and genetic diagnoses.  The co-occurrence of one or more non-ASD developmental diagnoses is 83%.  The co-occurrence of one or more psychiatric diagnoses is 10%.

Research has shown that a diagnosis of autism at age 2 can be reliable, valid and stable.

More children are being diagnosed at earlier ages – a growing number (18%) of them by age 3.  Still, most children are not diagnosed until after they reach age 4.  Diagnosis is a bit earlier for children with autistic disorder (4years) than for children with the more broadly-defined autism spectrum diagnoses (4 years, 5 months) and diagnosis is much later for children with Asperger Disorder (6 years, 3 months).

Studies have shown that parents of children with ASDs notice a developmental problem before their child’s first birthday.  Concerns about vision and hearing were more often reported in the first year, and differences in social, communication, and fine motor skills were evident from 6 months of age.

 

ECONOMIC COSTS

Individuals with an ASD had average medical expenditures that exceeded those without an ASD by $4,110-$6,200 per year.  On average, medical expenditures for individuals with an ASD were 4.1 – 6.2 times greater than for those without an ASD.  Differences in median expenditures ranged from $2,240 to $3,360 per year, with median expenditures 8.4 – 9.5 times greater.

In 2005, the average annual medical costs for Medicaid-enrolled children with an ASD were $10,709 per child, which was about six times higher than costs for children without an ASD ($1,812).

In addition to medical costs, intensive behavioral interventions for children with ASDs cost $40,000 to $60,000 per child per year.

Question?: Ppd Test

Chris asks…

Are there any dangers from repeating a potive PPD test for TB?

I tested borderline positive for the PPD test 3 years ago. Chest xray showed that lungs were clear.
Ive been told not to get another ppd test if i had tested positive. But i want to be sure, so i just go it done again today. Is the allergic reaction going to be bigger if i repeat the test and am in fact positive? What happens with each positive ppd?

admin answers:

Hi L, there is really no such thing as a “borderline” positive. It was either positive or negative based on the established cutoff measurements based on your medical history, exposure history, etc. I would agree with the other answer in that if you had a documented positive test, you should not get other TB skin tests ever. They would likely continue to be positive and the reaction could get worse with each subsequent test. If it were positive you should have been treated for latent TB. Afterwards, routine followup chest x-rays are not recommended either; what is recommended is periodic screening for symptoms and chest x-ray and other tests if symptoms develop. But sometimes employers require testing for initial employment in which case a chest x-ray could be done.

HOWEVER, if there were some question about the validity of the test, or if results were not available, you could consider having another skin test placed to resolve the issue. This is what is recommended by the experts (American Thoracic Society and Centers for Disease Control). Sounds like you have already done so. Hopefully it was placed and will be read by people who are experienced at doing TB skin tests. A health department is a good place to go for this.

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Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Anxiety / Stress;  GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology;  Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 21 Sep 2012 – 1:00 PDT Current ratings for:
Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity
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One in 88 children has been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new study by a University of Missouri researcher found that many children with ASD also experience anxiety, chronic gastrointestinal (GI) problems and atypical sensory responses, which are heightened reactions to light, sound or particular textures. These problems appear to be highly related and can have significant effects on children’s daily lives, including their functioning at home and in school.

Micah Mazurek, an assistant professor of health psychology and a clinical child psychologist, found in her study of 2,973 children and adolescents with ASD that nearly one-fourth also had chronic GI problems, such as constipation, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea or nausea. The results also showed that children with chronic GI problems were more likely to experience anxiety and sensory problems.

“These problems can have a very real impact on daily life. Children with anxiety may be distressed or reluctant to engage in new activities, and those with sensory problems may have trouble paying attention or participating in over-stimulating enviornments,” Mazurek said. “These children may also suffer uncomfortable GI problems that they may not be able to communicate about to adults.”

Clinicians should be aware that anxiety, GI problems and sensory sensitivity often co-occur in individuals with ASD. Effectively managing these concurrent issues may improve children’s quality of life and their responses to treatment, Mazurek said.

“Parents need to be aware that these problems may underlie some of their children’s difficulties, so if they notice any symptoms, they should talk to their doctors or therapists about treatment options,” Mazurek said. “Practitioners who work with children with ASD need to be mindful that there is a pretty high rate of these problems, so if children are treated for one issue, it may helpful to screen for these additional symptoms.”

This is the first study to examine the relationships among anxiety, GI problems and sensory over-responsivity in a large, nationally representative sample of children and adolescents with ASD. Participants in the study were enrolled in the Autism Treatment Network, a network of 17 autism centers throughout North America that are focused on best practices for medical treatment of children with ASD.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The study, “Anxiety, Sensory Over-Responsivity, and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” was published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. Mazurek is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Psychology in the MU School of Health Professions and a clinical child psychologist at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Mazurek’s coauthors from the School of Health Professions include Stephen Kanne, executive director of the Thompson Center and the William and Nancy Thompson Endowed Chair in Child Health in the Department of Health Psychology; and Lee Ann Lowery, director of the MU Pediatric Occupational Therapy Clinic in the Thompson Center and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy. Several experts external to MU also contributed to the study.
University of Missouri-Columbia Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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n.p. “Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 21 Sep. 2012. Web.
26 Sep. 2012. APA

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‘Interrelated Health Issues Experienced By Children With Autism: Anxiety, GI Problems, Sensory Over-Responsivity’

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Potential Link Between Autism And Smoking During Pregnancy

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Pregnancy / Obstetrics;  Smoking / Quit Smoking
Article Date: 30 Apr 2012 – 1:00 PDT

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Women who smoke in pregnancy may be more likely to have a child with high-functioning autism, such as Asperger’s Disorder, according to preliminary findings from a study by researchers involved in the U.S. autism surveillance program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“It has long been known that autism is an umbrella term for a wide range of disorders that impair social and communication skills,” says Amy Kalkbrenner, assistant professor in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, lead author of the study. “What we are seeing is that some disorders on the autism spectrum, more than others, may be influenced by a factor such as whether a mother smokes during pregnancy.”

The study was published in an advance online release by the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Smoking during pregnancy is still common in the U.S. despite its known harmful impacts on babies. Kalkbrenner found that 13 percent of mothers whose children were included in the study had smoked during pregnancy.

Kalkbrenner and colleagues’ population-based study compared smoking data from birth certificates of thousands of children from 11 states to a database of children diagnosed with autism maintained by the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network (ADDMN). Of the 633,989 children, born in 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998, 3,315 were identified as having an autism spectrum disorder at age 8.

“The study doesn’t say for certain that smoking is a risk factor for autism,” Kalkbrenner says. “But it does say that if there is an association, it’s between smoking and certain types of autism,” implicating the disorders on the autism spectrum that are less severe and allow children to function at a higher level. That connection, she adds, needs further study.

April is Autism Awareness Month, and several studies of possible links between environmental factors and autism are being published by Environmental Health Perspectives at the same time as Kalkbrenner’s study. “The CDC recently released data indicating that 1 in 88 children has an autism spectrum disorder, making such environmental studies even more timely,” says Kalkbrenner.

Because autism involves a broad spectrum of conditions and the interplay of genetics and environment is so complex, no one study can explain all the causes of autism, she adds. “The goal of this work is to help provide a piece of the puzzle. And in this we were successful.”

Other research articles published in Environmental Health Perspectives show that polychlorinated biphenyls disrupt early brain development by interfering with the signals that promote normal neuron branching. A review article suggests research directions for exploring a potential link between pesticides and autism. An editorial calls for increased discovery research to identify possible environmental causes of autism in America’s children.

“PCB 95 Promotes Dendritic Growth via Ryanodine Receptor-Dependent Mechanisms”

“PCB 95 Modulates Calcium-Dependent Signaling Pathway Responsible for Activity-Dependent Dendritic Growth”

“Tipping the Balance of Autism Risk: Potential Mechanisms Linking Pesticides and Autism”

“A Research Strategy to Discover the Environmental Causes of Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. For a pdf of the study, go to: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104556.
In addition to lead author Kalkbrenner, co-authors include: Joe Braun, Harvard School of Public Health; Maureen Durkin, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health; Matthew Maenner, Waisman Center at UW-Madison; Christopher Cunniff, University of Arizona College of Medicine; Li-Ching Lee, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Sydney Pettygrove, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona; Joyce Nicholas, Medical University of South Carolina; and Julie Daniels, UNC Gillings School of Public Health.
University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. “Potential Link Between Autism And Smoking During Pregnancy.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 30 Apr. 2012. Web.
4 May. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


‘Potential Link Between Autism And Smoking During Pregnancy’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

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Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.


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What Are Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)?

ASD is a group of developmental disabilities that greatly affect a person’s social, communication and behavioral abilities that a person typically deals with throughout their lifetime. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate the rate of autism occurrence is 1 in 100 children in the United States. This high number of occurrences makes ASD more common than pediatric cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. There is not a blood test or x-ray that can detect autism. It is generally diagnosed through observation in the areas listed below. Autism has a wide range of symptoms and looks differently with each child, but typically includes difficulty in one or more areas each category listed:

COMMUNICATION:

* Poor or limited eye contact

* Limited language skills, both receptive and expressive, verbal and nonverbal.

* Repetition or echoing of phrases in place of normal language usage

* Loss of language skills as a toddler

* Lack of reciprocate language skills when language is present

SOCIAL SKILLS:

* Lack of shared attention with others

* Inability to play with other children, parallel play may exist.

* Not showing an interest in other people, sometimes even significant others such as parents.

* Not able to understand and learn social cues most children pick up on naturally.

BEHAVIOR:

* Unusual reactions to the way things smell, taste, feel or sound.

* Little or no fear of common things.

* Unusual or unrealistic fears.

* Craving physical contact or avoiding physical contact.

* Restricted or limited interests; repetitive patterns of behavior.

* Difficulty with changes in routine.

* Insistence on things being done the same way.

* Using behavior as a means to communicate needs.

* Using people as objects to get things done.

ASD is a complicated disorder and affects 1 in 100 children according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). It affects boys 4:1 when compared to girls. Most children are diagnosed as young as age 3 by a pediatrician, neurologist or developmental specialist. Some children will show signs of autism but not be diagnosed. The key is know what to look for and be sure all areas listed above have at least one or more characteristic observable in a child. If as a parent you feel certain that something is going on with your child and the doctors won’t listen, or feel you are being over protecting, get a second opinion by someone trained in autism. Most of the time, parents are generally accurate in their assessment of their child. After all, a parent knows their child better than anyone else.

Kerri Duncan has been supporting families with children diagnosed with autism. She aims to increase awareness and educate those involved in the lives of individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. If you need more information and support, click here to see how she can help you and your child reach a brighter tomorrow.

For more information on ASD, contact Kerri Duncan, Ed.D., BCaBA 417.860.7640 or go to http://www.facebook.com/hart4autism.

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The Many Signs of Autism

If you are the parent of a newborn or young child and are worried about them being autistic, you will be interested in knowing that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have concluded that as many as one child in every 100 may be suffering with Autism. It is recommended that you begin observing your child as early as possible. Research has proven that the earlier a child is professionally diagnosed with the disorder, the easier it will be to treat the disorder and have the prognosis for a good outcome.

So what are the signs of Autism that you should be looking for? According to the NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health), the following are the warning signs of the disorder that you should be looking for in order to determine the possibility of your child being affected:

– They are not babbling, making meaningful gestures, or pointing by the time they are a year old
– They do not interact joyfully with others or smile
– They do not respond to their name when called
– They do not seem to know or understand how to play with their toys
– They exhibit poor eye contact
– They get attached to one specific object or toy
– They haven’t combined two words by the time they are 2 years old
– They haven’t spoken one word by the time they have reached 16 months of age
– They line up objects or their toys
– They lose acquired language or social skills
– They oftentimes appear to be hearing impaired or ignoring you

Granted, there could be a number of other explanations besides Autism for any of the above behaviors. For instance, the fact that a child spends time lining up objects or toys or shows a significant attachment to a particular object or toy is not a definitive sign of the disorder being present. Conversely, a child with excellent language skills could still be diagnosed with Autism. In fact, it is known that children have extraordinary language and reading skills despite the fact that they have been diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome.

Currently, there are other possible indicators of the disorder which is typically diagnosed by a process of interviewing the parents about the child and observing the child at the same time. However, a number of researchers have found several correlations between Autism and certain physical issues. In some instances, signs of Autism could be apparent could be present at birth.

The most important thing to remember is that observation of one’s child is critical. If you are suspicious of your child being affected with the disorder and you are seeing what you feel are signs of Autism, consult your child’s pediatrician or family physician immediately. Remember that the best course of action is to have the child diagnosed as early in life as possible. The sooner the child is diagnosed, the sooner they can start treatment and possibly witness a better outcome.

For the latest videos and training information on child development as well as books and curricula on Autism please visit childdevelopmentmedia.com.

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Free Social Stories For Autism – College And The Autistic Student

Free Social Stories For Autism

Autism, a neurological-based developmental disability, affects an anticipated one in 166 people, according to a 2004 study by the Centers for Disease Control Prevention. Both children and adults in Autism often times show tribulations in verbal and nonverbal communication, social interactions and leisure or play activities, according to the Autism Society of America. Autism causes individuals differently and to varying degrees. Free Social Stories For Autism

Experts agree on the following advice upon detection of Autism:

1. Seek immediate treatment for your child.

2. If possible, find someone to work with the child at least 20 hours a week, i.e. a therapist, teacher, parent, grandparent or someone from your church or group. Look for progress after one month.

3. Do not allow the child to sit and watch TV all day. Get them engaged and play as many games as possible that require taking turns.

4. New parents learning they have an autistic child must recognize immediately that they cannot do it all by themselves. They should immediately contact Autism societies or chapters to find resources, join support groups and talk with other families about their experiences. Free Social Stories For Autism

5. Help the child to develop their areas of strength, particularly among high-functioning students with Asperger’s Syndrome (a neurobiological condition characterized by normal intelligence and language development with deficiencies in social and communication skills), and get them job experiences during high school.

Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia is one of the few colleges in the US that has a special program in their Autism Training Center, which works with Autism spectrum disorders like Aspergers. Although many colleges have counselors and staff familiar with Autism, only Marshall has a program tailored specifically for autistic students. The program serves three of the university’s 16,360 students and may eventually accommodate 10; it will remain small by choice. Free Social Stories For Autism

“The goal is not for all students with Autism to attend Marshall, but for the program to become a model for other colleges,” says Barbara Becker-Cottrill, the Center’s director. “The true goal is for students to have the ability to attend the university of their choice. Our work will be working with other universities on how to establish a program such as this on their own campuses.” Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Free Social Stories For Autism program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Free Social Stories For Autism is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Forms Of Autism – 9 Autism Symptoms and Behaviors to Look For in Your Infant

Forms Of Autism

Infant signs of autism can put in a variety of behaviors the present can tip off parents of possible development issues. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder at which the infant, child, or adult has hassle with social interaction, behaviors several based on what i read in others of the same age group, and have problem amid communication skills.

Some specifics include:

* Prefer to play alone

* Unwilling to share or take turns with others

* Develop language skills more slowly than peers

* Lack of verbal communication

* Repetition of words or phrases

* Difficulty understanding the body language

* Inability or desire to listen to people

* Become upset and angry with change in schedule or routine

* Unusual organization skills The above checklist is far from complete, but it will give you somewhere to start your investigation of this neurodevelopmental disorder in your child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention claim that 1 in 150 infants are born with autism. And if you have a boy you should know that your boy is four times more likely to have autism over girls.

This is a staggering number of children that are affected by this disorder. Every parent should know, at minimum, the basic checklist of infant signs of autism to watch for as early detection of autism is critical. The earlier the detection the earlier the diagnosis and the sooner treatment can be administered. Treatments, not cures, are more effective the sooner they are administered, so every parent should know the symptoms. Forms Of Autism

The exact cause of autism isn’t known, but the disorder appears to have a strong genetic component. Researchers report if autism is present in one identical twin, there is a 75 percent chance the second twin will also be affected. Parents who have one child with autism have a 2 to 8 percent chance of having another child with the disorder. Infant brain imaging has shown that some children with autism have bigger brains than children of the same age.

This has been show to start in infants at the 12 month age. This is great news as the sooner a diagnosis of autism is reached the more effective the treatments will be at reducing the symptoms. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Forms Of Autism program now!

Forms Of Autism is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try the program and change child’s life forever!
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Autism Diagnostic Tests – The Facts About Autism

Autism Diagnostic Tests

According to the info gathered by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, autism is estimated to influence 1 for every 166 births. It is judged to be which about 1.5 million Americans are having from some craft of Autism. It is the fastest-growing developmental disability that has a 10-17% annual growth. In 1999, the US Department of Education had reported that there was a 172% increase on the prevalence of disability due to autism.Autism Diagnostic Tests

Based on the study conducted by The Autism Society of America, the annual cost needed for the services related to autism will be $200-400 billion in 10 years as the number of people with the disorder reach 4 million in the next decade. Autism can appear to any race, social background, class, gender, and to any child. It is four times more prevalent in males than in females.

What is Autism? Autism is a cognitive disorder that affects the developmental or learning ability of an individual. The manifestations of the disorder usually appear as early as the first three years of life. As a result of the neurological disorder, it disrupts the normal functioning of the brain affecting the development of the communication skills and social interaction skills of the person. Difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, leisure activities, and social interaction are seen in both children and adults with the disorder.

One should take note however, that there are varying degrees of autism for different individuals. For this reason, an early diagnosis is highly recommended. This is crucial so that the child can immediately benefit from the available specialized programs catering for the care of someone with autism. What are the characteristics of a person with autism? People with autism are also individuals. Like any other individual, a person with autism has his distinct characteristics. Some may respond mildly to an external stimulus, while others may become more aggressive. Some may have the initiative to make a conversation; meanwhile others totally lack the ability to have one. Autism Diagnostic Tests

Here are some of the traits that you may find in someone who has autism: They resist change. They have difficulty expressing their needs either verbally or non-verbally. They repeat words or phrases. They laughing or cry for no reason at all. They seem aloof and prefer to be alone. They have tantrums. They have difficulty in interacting with others. They have little or no eye contact.

They are unresponsive to a typical teaching method. They want sustained odd play They keep on spinning objects They are obsessive attached to objects They have a low threshold to pain. They don’t manifest fears or suspect danger. They are passive. They are non responsive to verbal and act as deaf in conversational voice. How can autism be diagnosed? There are no laboratory diagnostic tests known for autism. There are only diagnostic tools and screening tests available but this is done by consulting a trained specialist on the disorder. Autism Diagnostic Tests

It is diagnosed through careful observation done for a series of occasions in a given period of time. Studies have shown that early diagnosis gives a great benefit since it allows for early intervention and treatment that will enable the child to learn vital skills especially in communication. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autism Diagnostic Tests program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autism Diagnostic Tests is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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