Tag Archives: Casein Free Diet

Question?: Autism Symptoms In Teenagers

Linda asks…

gluten and cassien free diet for autistic children?

I have heard that a gluten and casein free diet helps the symptoms of autism, has anyone tried it with positive results?

admin answers:

A version of gluten and casein diet is called the “whole plant based diet.” It shuns excess oils, fats, sugars, salt, and processed ingredients. The food is prepared from whole plant based ingredients rather than being commercially processed. Diet drinks contain aspartame which is deleterious to health.

Even with “healthy” children, this diet results in improvements in health and behaviors. Sadly, the AMA fights successful and inexpensive alternative treatments that do not involve drugs. This way of eating has been proven to reduce risks of vascular disease, cancer, diabetes, gout, osteoporosis, and many other diseases that relate to diet. Some dementias are related to vascular health, and this diet helps this condition. Your family will be more alert and alive by eating this way. The book “Fasting and Eating for Health” by Dr. Joel Fuhrman explains some of this. Many people claim that the mercury used as a preservative in vaccinations is to blame of autism, however, I don’t know the details. If the blood work shows heavy metals, chelation treatment may help. My wife and I suffered some heavy metal poisoning and we recovered through careful diet planning.

To learn more, check out a book from your library by one of the following authors: Dr. Neal Barnard, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., Dr. Dean Ornish, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, and Dr. John McDougall.

I personally avoid all dairy products and bread products. Avoiding genetically modified ingredients is critical. Prior to this diet, I was one meal away from heart attack. Now, I’m measurably healthier than I was when I was a teenager. My blood work is perfect.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism In Toddlers

Michael asks…

Any suggestions on Gluten Free Casein Free diet for a toddler?

I’m getting my son evaluted for Autism in a few weeks, but as I’m researching autism and treatments I’ve noticed alot of links between Autism and Gluten allergies. I have a couple of friends that have Celiac disease and they have given me pointers on items they eat, but my perdicatment is alittle different because I’m dealing with a picky 2 year old. Does anyone have any suggestions?
Only serious answers please, If your friends friend has a toddler with this condition please don’t answer, I’d like answers from someone who knows about this first hand. Thanks =0)

admin answers:

Here are my toddler friendly GF suggestions: I do NOT know if they are CF bc I only eat GF!

Glutino Breakfast Bars www.glutino.com (similar to nutrigrain bars)
Envirokidz Vanilla Animal Cookies (health food stores and www.amazon.com) ONLY Vanilla is GF.

Glutino Honey Nut Cereal (like cheerios, also has Apple Cinammon)

Glutino has lots of other good cookies, bagels and breads.

Kinninnicks makes an AWESOME pizza crust. In stores and not sure about online. THey also make great donuts and breads.

Liek I said I am not sure if these are CF, but might i suggest you check out the Yahoo Group “foodallergynetwork” bc many of those members avoid Gluten and Casein and can probly help you more than me!!

Best of luck,
Amy
Chairperson La North Shore Celiac Sprue Association

PS Feel free toe mail me privately I have taught Early Head Start and Head start and worked with autistic children before.

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Question?: Treatment For Autism Spectrum Disorder In Children

Lizzie asks…

How to get a child onto the GFCF diet?

I have a child with ASD who is extremely picky. I have been doing alot of research and was interested in starting him on the GFCF diet but not quite sure how too as he doesn’t eat much? Any ideas!!

admin answers:

You might want to network with GFCF parents. The foods can be pretty bland, not to mention expensive. Did you try these resources:

Autism Network for Dietary Interventions provides help and support for families using a Gluten & Casein Free diet in the treatment of autism and related developmental disorders.

The Official GFCF Diet Support Group is a free informative website for dietary interventions for Autistic Spectrum Disorders, PDD-NOS, Celiac Disease and Gluten & Dairy Allergies/Intolerance

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Dietary interventions and Autism

Dietary interventions and Autism

In an effort to do everything possible to help their children, many parents continually seek new treatments. Some treatments are developed by reputable therapists or by parents of a child with ASD. Although an unproven treatment may help one child, it may not prove beneficial to another. To be accepted as a proven treatment, it should undergo clinical trials, preferably randomized, double-blind trials that would allow for a comparison between treatment and no treatment. Some of the interventions that have been reported to be helpful to some children, but whose clinical efficacy or safety have not been proven, are mentioned below.

Sausages may contain gluten via fillers or bin... Image via Wikipedia

Dietary interventions are based on the belief that 1) food allergies cause symptoms of autism, and 2) an insufficiency of a specific vitamin or mineral may cause some autistic symptoms. If parents decide to try a special diet for a given period of time, they should make sure that the child’s nutritional status is measured carefully.

A diet that some parents have found to be helpful to their autistic child is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Gluten is a casein-like substance that is found in the seeds of various cereal plants – wheat, oat, rye, and barley. Casein is the principal protein in milk. Since gluten and milk are found in many of the foods we eat, following a gluten-free, casein-free diet is difficult.

A supplement that some parents find to be beneficial for an autistic child is Vitamin B6, taken with magnesium (which makes the vitamin effective). The result of research studies is not conclusive; some children respond positively, some negatively, some not at all or very little.

In the search for a treatment of autism, there has been discussion lately about the use of secretin, a substance approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a single dose normally given to aid in diagnosis of a gastrointestinal problem. Anecdotal reports have shown improvement in autism symptoms, including sleep patterns, eye contact, language skills, and alertness. Several clinical trials conducted in the last few years have found no significant improvements in symptoms between patients who received secretin and those who received a placebo.

Karyn Seroussi, the mother of a formerly autistic boy, researched how dietary changes can affect autism, and used dietary exclusion to improve her son’s condition. Such treatments are part of the controversies in autism. She is known for her parent support advocacy efforts, and is the author of a book entitled Unraveling the Mystery of Autism & PDD: A Mother’s Story of Research and Recovery.

Seroussi’s work primarily addresses the debate between parents and professionals about what causes autism, and advocates the belief that in most cases it is a medically treatable disorder, through dietary and behavioral interventions, which needs to be diagnosed early and investigated appropriately.

Author Karyn Seroussi says her son now has no traces of autism, due in large part to a strict GFCF [gluten-free, casein-free] diet. Some parents report improved eye contact, less constipation or diarrhea, and better behavior. However, other parents do not notice a difference in their children.

Besides gluten and casein, some parents report that removing corn or soy led to equal or greater improvements in their children. Because soy protein is similar to gluten and casein, some diet proponents recommend removing it if the child seems sensitive.

Dietary and Other Interventions

In the past several years a great deal of emphasis has been placed on using a diet to control a number of conditions, including autism. There has been much talk about whether food sensitivities and allergies are the underlying cause for the severity of some symptoms of autism or, indeed, the symptoms themselves.

Although some people claim results of diet changes to be as dramatic as complete recovery from autism, most people agree that a change of diet isn’t a cure for autism because, in fact, there is no cure. However, proponents of dietary management of autism agree that many symptoms will decrease in severity and some may even disappear.
The most widely used diet for autism management is the Gluten Free/Casein Free (or GFCF) diet.

In addition to the theory of dietary management of autism, some believe that autism can be managed through the use of supplements to replace nutrients that are lacking.

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View the original article here

Dietary interventions and Autism

Dietary interventions and Autism

In an effort to do everything possible to help their children, many parents continually seek new treatments. Some treatments are developed by reputable therapists or by parents of a child with ASD. Although an unproven treatment may help one child, it may not prove beneficial to another. To be accepted as a proven treatment, it should undergo clinical trials, preferably randomized, double-blind trials that would allow for a comparison between treatment and no treatment. Some of the interventions that have been reported to be helpful to some children, but whose clinical efficacy or safety have not been proven, are mentioned below.

Sausages may contain gluten via fillers or bin... Image via Wikipedia

Dietary interventions are based on the belief that 1) food allergies cause symptoms of autism, and 2) an insufficiency of a specific vitamin or mineral may cause some autistic symptoms. If parents decide to try a special diet for a given period of time, they should make sure that the child’s nutritional status is measured carefully.

A diet that some parents have found to be helpful to their autistic child is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Gluten is a casein-like substance that is found in the seeds of various cereal plants – wheat, oat, rye, and barley. Casein is the principal protein in milk. Since gluten and milk are found in many of the foods we eat, following a gluten-free, casein-free diet is difficult.

A supplement that some parents find to be beneficial for an autistic child is Vitamin B6, taken with magnesium (which makes the vitamin effective). The result of research studies is not conclusive; some children respond positively, some negatively, some not at all or very little.

In the search for a treatment of autism, there has been discussion lately about the use of secretin, a substance approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a single dose normally given to aid in diagnosis of a gastrointestinal problem. Anecdotal reports have shown improvement in autism symptoms, including sleep patterns, eye contact, language skills, and alertness. Several clinical trials conducted in the last few years have found no significant improvements in symptoms between patients who received secretin and those who received a placebo.

Karyn Seroussi, the mother of a formerly autistic boy, researched how dietary changes can affect autism, and used dietary exclusion to improve her son’s condition. Such treatments are part of the controversies in autism. She is known for her parent support advocacy efforts, and is the author of a book entitled Unraveling the Mystery of Autism & PDD: A Mother’s Story of Research and Recovery.

Seroussi’s work primarily addresses the debate between parents and professionals about what causes autism, and advocates the belief that in most cases it is a medically treatable disorder, through dietary and behavioral interventions, which needs to be diagnosed early and investigated appropriately.

Author Karyn Seroussi says her son now has no traces of autism, due in large part to a strict GFCF [gluten-free, casein-free] diet. Some parents report improved eye contact, less constipation or diarrhea, and better behavior. However, other parents do not notice a difference in their children.

Besides gluten and casein, some parents report that removing corn or soy led to equal or greater improvements in their children. Because soy protein is similar to gluten and casein, some diet proponents recommend removing it if the child seems sensitive.

Dietary and Other Interventions

In the past several years a great deal of emphasis has been placed on using a diet to control a number of conditions, including autism. There has been much talk about whether food sensitivities and allergies are the underlying cause for the severity of some symptoms of autism or, indeed, the symptoms themselves.

Although some people claim results of diet changes to be as dramatic as complete recovery from autism, most people agree that a change of diet isn’t a cure for autism because, in fact, there is no cure. However, proponents of dietary management of autism agree that many symptoms will decrease in severity and some may even disappear.
The most widely used diet for autism management is the Gluten Free/Casein Free (or GFCF) diet.

In addition to the theory of dietary management of autism, some believe that autism can be managed through the use of supplements to replace nutrients that are lacking.

Enhanced by ZemantaTagged as: Dietary interventions

View the original article here

Is a Gluten and Casein-Free Diet an Answer to Autism or ADHD?

A gluten- and casein-free diet is as much of an answer to autism and ADHD as a band-aid that is soaked in antiseptic, and blood-clotting solution is an answer to a bullet that causes infection and bleeding in the body.

So, if one looks at some symptomatic improvement in both situations, autism and the bullet, and is happy to report it, there is nothing wrong with this, per se. However, if one assumes, in the process, that something of essence has been accomplished in autism, ADHD or in the overall health of this child, one has made the wrong assumption. The distributors of this and other diets often convey an impression that there is something fundamental or genetically sinister about these proteins – gluten and casein or other foods such as soy, corn, etc. – and, therefore, these and other diets are presented as some big answers to autism and chronic diseases. As “proof” to this, autism and other diseases do seem aggravated by allergic foods. However, in spite of the fact that these aggravations are formally correct, such an approach to chronic diseases is wrong because it confuses the trigger and the cause of disease. In practically 100% of all cases with allergens triggering any chronic disease, allergens are never the cause of autism or any other disease. Furthermore, the preoccupation with allergens detracts from the search for the ‘bullets’ – the true causes of disease – which by remaining in the body will inevitably continue causing further damage and destruction and, thus, leading to more advanced and more diseases.That is why avoiding triggers leads to neither substantial nor long-lasting progress. And that is why once the diet is broken, even if on few occasions, whichever the symptoms that seemed to have been subdued in autism and other diseases rebound viciously. In addition, even if the diets are maintained religiously, new triggers find their victim, anyway. That is why I have seen multitudes of patients who started out with excluding just 3-4 allergic foods from their diets and who have subsequently ended up becoming allergic to so many foods that they were down to only 3-4 foods, total. That is because that the bullets or the causes of allergies have remained in the body and kept eating it away as the disease and overall health worsened. So, the bottom line is don’t chase triggers, but pursue the bullets, instead.

What are these bullets in the case of gluten and casein in autism or in all food allergies, in general, and how to and how not to go about identifying and addressing these?

These “bullets” are primarily toxicological agents such as mercury, lead, methylmercury, pesticides and a few others as well as gastrointestinal infections such as parasitic, yeast, and, sometimes, bacterial infections also. The best way to misdiagnose these is to do exactly what most of the alternative practitioners do – that is, to order blood, stool and other lab tests. (Conventional doctors are even out of the equation here because they act as if their patients are immune to these toxicants or infections and that is why they hardly ever look for these.)

The main reason why blood, stool and other lab tests are unreliable is because their detection ability is very low. And even if a blood test confirms allergy to gluten or casein it is not worth subjecting your child to being stuck with needles because the blood test, even if positive, cannot tell what symptoms these or other foods or nonfood allergens will or will not trigger. This, one can establish simply by avoidance or observation.

As far as stool is concerned for gastrointestinal infections, in order for these tests to be positive, a sufficient and large number of infectious organisms or parasitic eggs must show up in the specimen on the day of collection. This rarely happens because these infectious agents may not be present in sufficient numbers on the intestinal surface itself but burrow inside it where they become undetectable to stool tests. And even if stool or lab tests catch one or two infections this does not mean that the tests did not overlook other infectious agents at the same time. It is often, that these other infections are the ones which cause most of the allergies and the notorious leaky gut which are commonly present in autism and other chronic diseases.

Of course, this is not anything that a diagnostic lab will share readily with a doctor or a doctor with you. As a result, most of the time, the lab tests end up misleading instead of leading. This, as many other important facts in medicine remains “classified”, i.e., not for patients’ ears. Besides, even if and when these infections become partially detected, the pharmaceutical treatments for these with using drugs or “natural treatments” can often be worse than the infections themselves. The reason for this we explain in the DVD, Autism -A curable disease that also explains why any chronic infections remain incurable whether in autism or Lyme disease or other as long as toxicological and other agents mentioned in the DVD continue causing the state of immuno suppression in the body. Concerning heavy metals and other toxicants, both lab and chelators/detoxifiers are not capable of properly addressing these either. Instead, the chelators can cause unpredictable and even worse toxic effects than the metals themselves. This is also reflected in the DVD, Autism – A curable disease and in my article Chelators of Mercury, Lead and Other Heavy Metals: Theoretical Benefits, Suboptimal Results and Real Dangers. The Implications for Autism, Other Brain- and Somatic Diseases. (This article, even in spite of being supported by scientific references, has been rejected for publication by several alternative medical peer review journals. Certainly, it flies in the face of their editorial staff which tries to dress up the store window of alternative medicine as “natural”, “progressive” and harmless. The reader may also find the DVD, The power of missing knowledge: An explanation for the failures of conventional and alternative medicine in chronic and degenerative diseases. An introduction to FCT as very edifying as it explains why terminology as “natural”, “progressive” or “harmless” belongs rather to the territory of fairy tales or naive assumptions, rather than to the real facts or factual science.)

The main diagnostic tool that I use and that overcomes all of the lab hurdles and omissions is – bioresonance testing. This noninvasive test that is capable of tuning into gastrointestinal and any other organs energetically and completely pain free is ideal for children and adults, also. This is particularly the case for children with autism who have been through the proverbial mills of tests.

Homeopathic treatment that begins with the removal of the immunosuppressive agents and residues of antibiotics or side-effects of vaccines, the necessary requirements without which all infections are doomed to chronicity, treats these infections very effectively. As the rule, “genetic” gluten and casein and other food allergies disappear. Following the treatment course, children or adults consume formerly allergic foods without untoward reactions.

For more details and viewing presentations of cured children from autism go to Autism – A curable disease.

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Autism in the News – 02.29.12

Teacher allegedly ordered boy with autism into cardboard box (Wildomar, Calif.)
A Riverside county teacher has been removed from her classroom after a mother complained to the school district about her child being ordered to go into a cardboard box. Read more.

Gluten-free, casein-free diet may help some children with autism (Medical Xpress)
A gluten-free, casein-free diet may lead to improvements in behavior and physiological symptoms in some children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to researchers at Penn State. The research is the first to use survey data from parents to document the effectiveness of a gluten-free, casein-free diet on children with ASD. Read more. 

Autism support group to reactivate in southern Ocean County (Little Egg Harbor, N.J.)
Families for Autistic Children Education & Support, a nonprofit organization dedicated to education and support of children with autism and their families, will reactivate Sunday in a new location in southern Ocean County. Read more. 

Autism’s angel (The Quinnipiac Chronicle)
When Shannon Fitzmaurice left to study abroad in Rome, she tearfully said goodbye to her parents, and younger brother and sister, Brendan and Meghan. After excitedly counting down the days during winter break of her sophomore year at Quinnipiac, Fitzmaurice realized she would be without her siblings, also two of her best friends, for several months. Read more. 

Special-ed changes upset Riverside parent (The Now)
One Port Coquitlam mom is looking for answers about why her daughter has had nine different special education assistants (SEAs) this school year. Read more.

Autism Speaks’ daily blog “Autism in the News” is a mix of top news stories of the day. Autism Speaks does not vet the stories and the views contained therein do not necessarily reflect Autism Speaks beliefs or point of view.

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Some Children With Autism May Benefit From A Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diet

Main Category: Autism
Also Included In: Nutrition / Diet;  GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology
Article Date: 01 Mar 2012 – 1:00 PST

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A gluten-free, casein-free diet may lead to improvements in behavior and physiological symptoms in some children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to researchers at Penn State. The research is the first to use survey data from parents to document the effectiveness of a gluten-free, casein-free diet on children with ASD.

“Research has shown that children with ASD commonly have GI [gastrointestinal] symptoms,” said Christine Pennesi, medical student at Penn State College of Medicine. “Notably, a greater proportion of our study population reported GI and allergy symptoms than what is seen in the general pediatric population. Some experts have suggested that gluten- and casein-derived peptides cause an immune response in children with ASD, and others have proposed that the peptides could trigger GI symptoms and behavioral problems.”

The team – which included Laura Cousino Klein, associate professor of biobehavioral health and human development and family studies – asked 387 parents or primary caregivers of children with ASD to complete a 90-item online survey about their children’s GI symptoms, food allergy diagnoses, and suspected food sensitivities, as well as their children’s degree of adherence to a gluten-free, casein-free diet. The team’s results appeared online this month in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience.

Pennesi and Klein and their team found that a gluten-free, casein-free diet was more effective in improving ASD behaviors, physiological symptoms and social behaviors for those children with GI symptoms and with allergy symptoms compared to those without these symptoms. Specifically, parents noted improved GI symptoms in their children as well as increases in their children’s social behaviors, such as language production, eye contact, engagement, attention span, requesting behavior and social responsiveness, when they strictly followed a gluten-free, casein-free diet.

According to Klein, autism may be more than a neurological disease – it may involve the GI tract and the immune system.

“There are strong connections between the immune system and the brain, which are mediated through multiple physiological symptoms,” Klein said. “A majority of the pain receptors in the body are located in the gut, so by adhering to a gluten-free, casein-free diet, you’re reducing inflammation and discomfort that may alter brain processing, making the body more receptive to ASD therapies.”

The team found that parents who eliminated all gluten and casein from their children’s diets reported that a greater number of their children’s ASD behaviors, physiological symptoms and social behaviors improved after starting the diet compared to children whose parents did not eliminate all gluten and casein. The team also found that parents who implemented the diet for six months or less reported that the diet was less effective in reducing their child’s ASD behaviors.

According to the researchers, some of the parents who filled out the surveys had eliminated only gluten or only casein from their children’s diets, but survey results suggested that parents who completely eliminated both gluten and casein from their child’s diet reported the most benefit.

“While more rigorous research is needed, our findings suggest that a gluten-free, casein-free diet might be beneficial for some children on the autism spectrum,” Pennesi said. “It is also possible that there are other proteins, such as soy, that are problematic for these children.”

The reason Klein and Pennesi examined gluten and casein is because they are two of the most common “diet offenders.”

“Gluten and casein seem to be the most immunoreactive,” Klein said. “A child’s skin and blood tests for gluten and casein allergies can be negative, but the child still can have a localized immune response in the gut that can lead to behavioral and psychological symptoms. When you add that in with autism you can get an exacerbation of effects.”

Klein’s advice to parents of children with ASD?

“If parents are going to try a gluten-free, casein-free diet with their children, they really need to stick to it in order to receive the possible benefits,” she said.

“It might give parents an opportunity to talk with their physicians about starting a gluten-free, casein-free diet with their children with ASD.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Penn State. “Some Children With Autism May Benefit From A Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diet.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 Mar. 2012. Web.
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posted by Steve on 9 Mar 2012 at 7:37 am

Wouldn’t it stand to reason if eliminating gluten and casein from autistic children provides benefits to a good number of them that eliminating gluten and casein from non-autistic children would also have benefits to a number of them?

Anecdotal evidence repeatedly indicates a much larger percentage of the general public has negative reactions to gluten and casein then ever realized.

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Autistic Interventions – Autism And Aggressive Behavior

Autistic Interventions

A Biomedical Autism Doctor Explains The Causes Behind Aggressive Behavior in Autistic Children

The Need For Biomedical Autism Intervention

A actually troubling issue amongst some individuals on the autism-spectrum is aggressive and/or self-injury behavior (SIB). This can be relatively common in children (and as teenagers and adults) who lack the ability to communicate verbally, as positively as those kids transitioning from one developmental stage to another. No particular time is more challenging as opposed to when a child is transitioning through puberty to become a young adult. There is no misgiving that chosen individual’s behavior is benefitted by prescription medicine – particularly when aggressive behaviors put themselves or others in danger. However, biomedical autism intervention and attention has advantages as well, and is often an overlooked problem in autism. Autistic Interventions

Biomedical Autism intervention Strategy # 1 – Diet

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As a biomedical specialist I have seen on many occasions that biomedical autism intervention such as the gluten and casein-free diet has helped with aggressive and/or SIB. Other food sensitivities can be problematic as well such as corn, corn syrup, artificial colors, flavors and more. Each person is different, but food sensitivities should definitely be assessed.

Biomedical Autism intervention Strategy #2 – Digestive Issues

Another contributing factor for aggressive and/or SIB is intestinal problems such as bacteria and/or yeast overgrowth, along with chronic constipation and intestinal pain. Toxins from the microbes can affect ASD individuals quite profoundly, and the pain associated with constipation, inflammation and cramping can create tremendous stress – particularly in a child, teenager, or ASD adult who cannot adequately communicate their discomfort. Again, all of these issues can be addressed through biomedical autism treatment.  Autistic Interventions

Biomedical Autism intervention Strategy #3 – Environmental Allergies

Another issue that contributes to aggressive and/or SIB is environmental allergies – many of which go undetected. Contributing factors include pollen, grass or other airborne allergies. Animal dander or mold spores can be problematic as well. Allergens trigger histamine release which triggers inflammation. Increased inflammation can affect an individual not only in their respiratory areas such as the lungs, sinuses and nasal passages, but neurologically as well. Systemic inflammation is a common issue in autism, particularly nervous system inflammation. Increased allergens can contribute to chemical imbalances in the brain resulting in adverse behavior. Many times biomedical autism treatment such as nutritional supplements can reduce sensitivity to environmental allergens. Also, the addition of an allergy medication can be helpful as well. Don’t let your love ones suffer anymore! Lead them out through Autistic Interventions program now!

Feeling lost without solutions? Autistic Interventions is a proven Autism Solution for your Child. Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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Diet for Teens with Asperger Syndrome

Eating a healthy and well balanced diet is one of the keys to good health for people of all age, including those teens with Asperger.

A combination of foods should be consumed each day, including fruits and vegetables, dairy products, meat, and whole grains.But for teenagers, the common food in their diets are foods that are mostly found in a fast food chains like cheese burgers, pizzas, ice cream and soft drinks. And some of them are not eating regularly for they do not want to become fat.

To ensure that these young adults with Aspergers syndrome are eating a nutritional balanced diet, their parents must influence their teenager’s diet and eating habits. They must give appropriate diet and nutrition that are helpful to improve the social skills of their teens. They must also make sure that their teens do not skip meals and must have enough water intakes for it may cause additional absent-mindedness, moods swings and irritations.

Teenagers need to eat well to ensure that they get the proper nutrients, vitamins and minerals that their bodies needed especially to teens with Asperger.

Some health providers may encourage adding organic diet for Asperger syndrome in teenagers. They believe that this diet may offer some relief from the symptoms of the syndrome. And they think that young adult may find it easier to focus while at school and while in therapy sessions to help them learn more effective techniques for interacting with others.

Another option for organic diet for Asperger Syndrome in teens is the Gluten Free and Casein Free diet. In this diet, teens must not foods containing gluten, such as wheat, rye and barley. Casein is found in milk, and it must not include in the diet.

The guidelines in preparing healthy and proper meals are: reduce and eliminate gradually unhealthy foods like high sugar; foods that are high in salt and fat content; foods containing artificial ingredients, preservatives and artificial coloring; get rid of soft drinks and canned goods. Instead of Add more fresh foods into their diet like fruits such as apples, carrots, nut mixes, cheese, crackers, and hard boiled eggs. Parents should make sure that their teens always eat breakfast. Breakfast meals are very important for they regulate energy level, brain power, and moods level.

Parents of young adults with Asperger Syndrome should discuss their child’s diet with their health care professional so that it can be included into an overall treatment plan.

Dr. John E. Neyman, Jr.Christian CounselorDr. John has reared 3 children, Philip, Laura, and Matthew. Dr. John has been teaching families for the last 30 years. He is a family coach that specializes in parenting. Dr. John’s motto is “Empowering parents to transform their homes.” Dr. John was a pastor for 25 years.Dr. John has been serving as a Counselor/therapist for 30 years. He is currently a Behavior Specialist Consultant and Mobile Therapist in Western PA. Dr. John also is the director /Owner of the Renewed Life Counseling Center. Dr. John is a bestselling author entitled Wake up Live the Life You love: Success and Wake up Live the Life You Love: Freedom.Dr. John has developed a strategy that parents are able to use immediately, and effectively. It is entitled Power moments with Your Children. It takes less than 1 minute to put a strategy into place. Dr. John holds degrees from Liberty University and Rochville University.Dr. John has a passion to teach principles that transforms lives. He has spoken to audiences from 4 to 4 thousand. Dr. John’s teachings are practical, pointed, and powerful.
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