Tag Archives: Brain Disorder

Question?: Autism Symptoms In 7 Year Old

Chris asks…

what is autisme exactly about?

i have a sister, she cannot talk even she’s 7 yearold. some doctor said that she is hyperactive, but, other said that she is autisme. what is autisme exactly about? i’m very confused!!!

admin answers:

Autism -brain disorder that often interferes with a person’s ability to communicate with and relate to others.

Signs of autism almost always develop before a child is 3 years old, the condition is sometimes not diagnosed until later. Parents first become concerned when they notice that their toddler does not begin to talk or does not respond and interact like other children of the same age. Toddlers with autism do not usually develop speech normally and may seem to be deaf although hearing tests are normal.

Autism also affects how a child perceives and processes sensory information.

Severity of autism varies. Some ppl need assistance in almost all aspects of their daily lives, while others are able to function at a very high level and can even attend school in a regular classroom. This is a lifelong condition that uaually results in some degree of social isolation, treatment can make a major difference in the lives of people with autism. Early diagnosis and comprehensive treatment has resulted in increasing numbers of people with autism being able to live independently as adults..

What causes autism?
Autism tends to run in families, suggesting a genetic link. Because people with autism can be vastly different, scientists suspect a number of genes are responsible. Ongoing research is targeted at pinpointing these genes. Some experts also believe that environmental factors may play a part in causing autism, although scientists have studied several factors, including vaccines, and have yet to identify such a cause.

Brain scans of people with autism have shown abnormalities in several areas of the brain, including those responsible for emotion and social relations. Other studies suggest that people with autism have high levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin, a chemical that sends messages in the brain. However, these findings are preliminary, and ongoing studies seek to explain the brain and autism.1

What are the symptoms?
All people with autism have difficulty with social interactions and relationships. Parents often describe their child with autism as preferring to play alone and making little eye contact with other people. Other symptoms of autism include:

Difficulties with verbal and nonverbal communication. Language development in children with autism is almost always delayed.
Limited, repetitive, and overused (stereotyped) patterns of behavior, interests, and play. Many typical behaviors-such as repetitive body rocking, unusual attachments to objects, and holding fast to routines and rituals-are driven by the need for sameness and resistance to change.
There is no “typical” person with autism. Although autism is defined by the above characteristics, people with autism can have many different combinations of behaviors in mild to severe forms.

Do any other conditions occur with autism?
Although it is difficult to determine, studies show that below-normal intelligence occurs in about 70% of children with autism.2 Teenagers with autism often become depressed and have increased anxiety, especially if they have average or above-average intelligence. In addition, about a third of children with autism develop a seizure disorder (such as epilepsy) by their teen years.3

How is autism diagnosed?
Your health professional will use diagnostic guidelines, established by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), to determine whether your child has core symptoms.4 A child may also have hearing and other tests to make sure developmental delays aren’t the result of another condition with similar symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment of autism is important to make the most of the child’s potential.

How is it treated?
Behavioral training, speech and occupational therapy, and parent education and support can often improve a child’s problem behaviors, communication skills, and socialization. Medications are sometimes helpful as well. A child with autism responds best to a highly structured, specialized educational program tailored to his or her individual needs. However, specific treatment varies depending on the range of individual symptoms, which can combine in many different ways and change over time.

Parents, school staff, and health professionals are usually all involved in planning a child’s treatment.

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Question?: Rett Syndrome Research

Chris asks…

Who all here thinks autism is genetic? If you do not think this is the cause-then what do you think?

I have a son with autism and a brother with autism.I feel autism is genetic.

admin answers:

I work for an agency that serves people with developmental disabilities. Based on our own clients, it looks to me like there are several causes, and it is genetic at least some of the time.

One specific cause of autism is Rett’s Disorder; it’s a certain type of brain disorder that affects only females and appears to have a definite genetic component.

Some of our clients with Autism also have other developmental disabilites such as Down’s Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Epilepsy, etc. Sometimes it can be traced to brain damage at birth.

We do have several clients from the same families who have the same or similar disorders; such as Austism.

I noticed one thing; I have seen where it’s fairly common for children diagnosed with Autism to have a relative (parent, aunt, uncle or aunt, grandparent) who has a mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. I don’t know if any link has been proven.

The Center For Disease Control did research on autism (some of the information they used was from our agency). They found no connection between autism and the mercury in vaccines.

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How Can I Tell If My Child Has A Form Of Autism?

In this article I will try to answer the question that I often hear, and that is how can I tell if my child has a form of autism?

As a parent, different concerns will arise about your children from time to time and it is not unusual to sometimes wonder if there is something going on with your child, particularly if you notice other children are starting to develop and socialise differently to your child.

Over time, changes can become more obvious so it is important to be aware of signs of autism if you have any suspicions.

This article will discuss

· The tell tale signs of autism like behaviour

· What to do if you suspect your child has a form of autism?

Autism like behaviour is characterised by difficulties in social settings and social interactions, verbal and non verbal communication and often repetitive types of behaviours and actions.

As autism is a complex brain disorder, not all of these common characteristics may apply to your child as it depends on the mildness or severity of the case.

Some children are diagnosed with a form of autism as early as two years old. However you may suspect your child is not responding as they should from an earlier age when they are not doing things such as smiling, following with their eyes or body, taking interest in things, pointing, babbling or making attempts at speech.

Over time it will become more obvious that your child is not developing normally so it is important to act fast on any suspicions you have and have your child seen by a professional.

They will be able to conduct an autism screening assessment of your child. Having your child seen at the earliest opportunity affords the best success for your child.

To date studies have shown that early intervention gives the best success for helping your child progress their development and maximise their chances for a good outcome.

In addition to availing of early intervention services if your child has a form of autism, you also need to ensure you have the best “team” for your child who will work well with your child and help bring out the best in him or her.

Since no two children with a form of autism are alike, there will be a certain therapies, treatments and solutions that will work for your child but may be less effective or ineffective for other children with autism. Do not be afraid to keep trying new things but do allow enough time before discounting any therapy or treatment.

Do you want to learn more about special needs parenting? If so, download my free guide here: http://www.parenting4specialneeds.com/
Orla Kelly is a special needs parenting coach, and can help you help your child.

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Unruly Kids May Have A Mental Disorder

Main Category: Mental Health
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health;  Autism
Article Date: 01 May 2012 – 0:00 PDT

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When children behave badly, it’s easy to blame their parents. Sometimes, however, such behavior may be due to a mental disorder.

Mental illnesses are the No. 1 cause of medical disability in youths ages 15 and older in the United States and Canada, according to the World Health Organization.

“One reason we haven’t made greater progress helping people recover from mental disorders is that we get on the scene too late,” said Thomas R. Insel, MD, director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the featured speaker at the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Presidential Plenary during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Boston.

Dr. Insel discussed signs of mental illnesses in young children and the importance of early diagnosis and intervention in his presentation, “What Every Pediatrician Needs to Know about Mental Disorders,” in the Hynes Convention Center.

As the first line of defense, pediatricians can detect mental disorders early and ensure children get treatment as soon as possible, Dr. Insel said. While questionnaires currently are the best way for doctors to screen for mental illness, better tools are on the horizon, such as cognitive and genetic tests.

It’s also important to understand that mental illnesses are a developmental brain disorder even though they can look like behavior problems, Dr. Insel explained.

“The future of mental illness has to be at the point where we aren’t treating behavior separately from the rest of the person,” he said. “There needs to be full integration of behavior and medical concerns to ensure that we are able to care for the whole person and not just one system.”

In addition to serving as director of the NIMH, Dr. Insel is acting director of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, a new arm of the National Institutes of Health that aims to accelerate the development of diagnostics and therapeutics.

Autism also is an area of interest for Dr. Insel. He chairs the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to joining NIMH, he was director of the Center for Autism Research and professor of psychiatry at Emory University, where he was the founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our mental health section for the latest news on this subject. Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

American Academy of Pediatrics. “Unruly Kids May Have A Mental Disorder.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 1 May. 2012. Web.
4 May. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Helena on 2 May 2012 at 9:38 am

Is your kid unruly? He may have a mental disorder. At least that’s what the psychiatric drug companies want you to think…

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‘Unruly Kids May Have A Mental Disorder’

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Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism

Main Category: Autism
Article Date: 05 Mar 2012 – 1:00 PST

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Impaired social function is a cardinal symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the brain circuits that enable us to relate to other people is the “mirror neuron” system. This brain circuit is activated when we watch other people, and allows our brains to represent the actions of others, influencing our ability to learn new tasks and to understand the intentions and experiences of other people.

This mirror neuron system is impaired in individuals with ASD and better understanding the neurobiology of this system could help in the development of new treatments.

In their new study, Dr. Peter Enticott at Monash University and his colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation to stimulate the brains of individuals with ASD and healthy individuals while they observed different hand gestures. This allowed the researchers to measure the activity of each individual’s mirror neuron system with millisecond precision in response to each observed action.

They found that the individuals with ASD showed a blunted brain response to stimulation of the motor cortex when viewing a transitive hand gesture. In other words, the mirror neuron system in the ASD individuals became less activated when watching the gestures, compared to the healthy group. In addition, among people with ASD, less mirror neuron activity was associated with greater social impairments. This finding adds to the evidence that deficits in mirror neuron system functioning contribute to the social deficits in ASD.

This finding also directly links a specific type of brain dysfunction in people with autism spectrum disorder to a specific symptom. This is important because “we do not have a substantial understanding of the brain basis of autism spectrum disorder, or a validated biomedical treatment for the disorder,” said Dr. Enticott. “If we can develop a substantial understanding of the biology of specific symptoms, this will allow us to develop treatments targeted specifically to the symptoms.”

“This study is an example of the effort to break down the component problems associated with autism spectrum disorder and to map these problems on to particular brain circuits,” commented Dr. John Krystal, editor of Biological Psychiatry.

Enticott added, “We are currently investigating whether non-invasive brain stimulation can be used to improve mirror neuron activity in autism spectrum disorder, which would have substantial potential therapeutic implications.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our autism section for the latest news on this subject. The article is “Mirror Neuron Activity Associated with Social Impairments but not Age in Autism Spectrum Disorder” by Peter G. Enticott, Hayley A. Kennedy, Nicole J. Rinehart, Bruce J. Tonge, John L. Bradshaw, John R. Taffe, Zafiris J. Daskalakis, and Paul B. Fitzgerald (doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.09.001). The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 71, Issue 5 (March 1, 2012), published by Elsevier.
The authors’ affiliations, and disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available in the article.
John H. Krystal, M.D., is Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine and a research psychiatrist at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System. His disclosures of financial and conflicts of interests are available here.
Elsevier Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Elsevier. “Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 5 Mar. 2012. Web.
9 Mar. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Nancy on 6 Mar 2012 at 6:15 am

My impression from the article is that in order for the
Child to comprehend the movement , it should be repeated or
Exaggerated in order for there to be comprehension.

In practicality it does not make sense to me.

Please correct me as to it’s application.

Thanks,
Nancy

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‘Mirror Neuron System Impaired In Autism’

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Types Of Autism Revealed

The term “autism” is a generalized term which falls inside a larger medical category oftentimes called “the 5 Pervasive Development Disorders”. Autism is the most common type of development disorder and can appear in a range of  types and severity of condition. This has led to the term “Autism Spectrum Disorder” which can be often used to identify and discuss the differing types of autism. What this implies is that someone diagnosed as having autism will have one of several different types of autism which have features that are comparable in some respects and different in others.

Inside the Autism Spectrum Disorder there exists four subcategories of autism which are Asperger Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder and Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified or “PDD-NOS”. Seeing as each of these are types of autism they all share some general autism traits.

It is generally acknowledged that autism is related to the brain or what some are now calling “mindblindness”. At some point between birth and the first two-and-a-half years of age there’s a serious development problem inside the brain that prevents parts of the brain from functioning as one. As the child gets older they find it more and more difficult to communicate and connect to other people around them in what we deem a normal and socially acceptable manner. Dependant upon how bad the brain disorder was early on in life will determine how serious the type of autism is when the child becomes older.

What we have discussed thus far has told us that all types of autism are linked to a condition within the brain. Now we will look at how each of the types of autism are different.

1. Asperger Syndrome (AS)

indicated by impaired speech and communication skills
restrictive patterns in the manner the individual behaves and thinks

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Children with Asperger Syndrome often exhibit very obsessive behavior towards a single subject or topic and refuse to focus on anything else. This makes it very difficult for them to socialize with others, especially their peer group and they find it hard to talk and interact normally. Also very common is delayed learning when it comes to motor skills like riding a bike, being able to catch a ball or even climbing on playground equipment. The child is usually thought of as being clumsy and inept.

2. Rett Syndrome

symptoms tend to be noticed earlier on in a child’s life than other types of autism
generally is encountered only in girls and unexpectedly begins to surface some six to eighteen months after a normal infant development pattern

A baby with Rett Syndrome exhibits a slow down or oftentimes even a loss of customary development skills that were already developed before Rett Syndrome. Added signs of this infant disorder may include problems learning to walk, increased delay in learning basic motor skills and often there is a lessening in skull growth rate.

3. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD)

less common type of autism
occurs later than other types of autism, not until around age 3 or four
frequently a dramatic loss of social, communication and other kinds of skills

A child afflicted with CDD generally has demonstrated normal development well beyond that phase where other types of autism may become evident. Everything appears fine, until unexpectedly around the ages of 3 or 4 the child in a short time begins to have difficulty speaking normally, doing social activities with others and begins to fall behind in normal skill development for their age group. In very severe cases this may even lead to mental retardation.

4. Pervasive Development Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS)

generally the mildest type of autism and is usually diagnosed around 4 years old
core features are problems with social interaction and communication

A child with PDD-NOS enjoys the company of other people but has a difficult time reacting appropriately and making genuine connections with their friends. For example they find it difficult to relate to the feelings of others, and as such would not know how to appriopriately react if someone is laughing or crying. Areas of difficulty with respect to communicating with other people include a restricted vocabulary, repetitive language, narrow interests and poor nonverbal communication.

As you can see the definition of autism just isn’t so simple as many people presume it to be. Differing autism features have given rise to a number of different types of autism that will impinge on children and adults in a wide range of ways, often depending upon how severe the condition is for that person.

It is extremely important to understand that the above facts about autism, together with the types of autism discussed, are merely general guidelines and are in no way intended to be a medical diagnosis. If you believe that your son or daughter may have autism, then please seek out medical advice from a physician.

Take action now to find out more about what is autism disorder and learn to help your child and yourself as a concerned parent or an adult dealing with autism. Visit our website now to learn more about the types of autism and much more. Articles on autism, videos and links to other resources including books on autism. Let us help you as we have already helped hundreds of other concerned parents with autistic children as well as adults with autism .
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Autism Spectrum Disorder

INTRODUCTION

Every parent has hopes and dreams for their children and all parents want their kids to

be the best and even though no one is ever perfect, they would still try to make them

perfect, But all this may be shattered once this little boy or girl gets diagnosed with

one of the most alarming disorders in the world of childhood disorders which is not

only a serious disability; but is also a bewildering one this disorder is called Autism.

A. Title:

Autism Spectrum Disorder

B. Why Autism?

there were six childhood psychological disorders other then autism that any person would find very interesting to do a research about, but autism is found to be one of the most dangerous and confusing childhood disorder any parent can find also learning a bit about autism in Oman made it very important to talk and explain this disorder to Omani parents and the Omani community as a whole.

C. Purpose:

To spread awareness on the Autistic Spectrum Disorder in Oman and this will have a great and positive impact on the treatment of the Omani children that were diagnosed with Autism.

 

 

D. Objectives:
To give the reader a clear and detailed information on the Autistic Spectrum Disorder.
To spread awareness on the Autistic Spectrum Disorder to the Omani people in specific.
E. Limits and Difficulties:
The time given before the dead-line was not enough.
References like books, articles, etc… Related to the subject were very limited.

 

F. Methodology:

The methods used to complete this report included reading from different sources including: Books, Magazines, and Web sites also visiting The Muscat Autism Center was very helpful.

 

 

 

 

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder

The Root of the word “Autism:

The word Autism comes or drives from the Greek word “Auto” which means self, and the adjective word “Autistic” literally means alone.

In the world of psychology and psychiatry autism or Autistic Spectrum Disorder is defined as:

A life-long brain disorder that is normally diagnosed in early childhood.
A disorder that causes kids to experience the world differently from the way most other kids do.
A complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others.

The history of Autism:

The word “Autism” was first used in 1943 by a psychiatric and physician called Leo Kanner who wrote a paper on “Autistic Disturbance of Attitude contact ” for a journal called: nervous child” which does not exist anymore, Dr. Leo wrote that article after conducting a research on 11 children of ages between two to eight years old who had similar symptoms which included difficulties communicating with others, difficulties interacting with others, and having unusual interests. Before the publication of that article children with the previous symptoms were labeled as “schizophrenic”. (Kocgel & Lazebnik)

 

Types of Autism

 

There are many types of autism some are known while others are not known, but there are 5 main types that most researchers agree with, which are:

1) Classic Autism:

This type can be recognized before the age of 3 years, but can be diagnosed later in life. Children diagnosed with classic autism show lack of eye to eye contact, lack of affection or emotional contact with others, difficulty to socialize and interact with others, intense wish for sameness in routine, and develop language late or not at all.

Children diagnosed with Classic autism also show high levels of Visio -spatial skills* but major difficulties in other areas.

2) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which  includes:

A)    Aspergers Syndrome:

Is a form of autism in which speech development and IQ are normal, but in which social disabilities can be compounded by depression and mental health problems [1]. This syndrome is a higher functioning disorder than classic autism and can range from mild to saver. A child diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome can exhibit a number of characteristics, show deficiencies in social skills and have difficulties with transition or change ( they compulsively stick to rituals and any changes in their routine can upset them), they also find it difficult to read body language and to determine the proper body space.

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Some of the kids that were diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome have shown reduced sensitivity to pain & an increased sensitivity to bright light and loud noises.

*Visual Spatial Learners have a very wide imagination, that helps them make a whole movie just by reading something, that is because they can draw a picture in their mind about anything they read or hear.

 

B)  Rett Syndrome or Rex Syndrome:

This is a neurological & developmental disorder that is marked by poor head growth. Some doctors claim that Rett or Rex Syndrome is not a part of autism spectrum disorder, the reason behind this claim is that Rett or Rex Syndrome is a disorder that mostly occurs in females whereas autism affects mostly males.

Children suffering from this syndrome show loss of muscle tone, diminished eye contact, and crawling or walking problems, they also stop using their hands and often develop stereotyped hand movements such as: wringing, clapping, or patting their hands. Kids diagnosed with Rett or Rex Syndrome loses the ability to perform motor skills.

C) Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD):

This disorder occurs a little late in the child’s life, first the child seems perfectly normal then by the age of 2-4 years they start to regress, where they stop socializing with people, loss potty-training skills, stop playing, and stop making friends. The difference between autism and CDD is the long period of normal development below age 2. (Bock & Stauth, 1999)

D) Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS):

A child that exhibits some but not all of the classic autism symptoms is said to have PDD-NOS.

Children with PDD-NOS either do not fully meet the criteria of symptoms used to diagnose any of the four specific types of autism or do not have the degree of impairment described in any of the above four specific types.

Causes of Autism

Until this very day no one knows what the exact cause of autism is the only thing that is clear is that autism affects 1 of 150 kids.

The brain contains over 100 billion nerve cells called neurons. Each neuron may have hundreds or thousands of connections that carry massages to other nerve cells in the brain and body. The connections and the chemical messengers (called neurotransmitters) let the neurons that help you see, move, remember, and work together as they should, but for some reason some of the cells and connections in the brain of a kid with autism –especially those that affect communication, emotion, and senses- don’t develop properly or get damaged. Scientists are still trying to understand how and why this happens [1].

Is lack of a mother’s affection a cause for autism?

While the definite causes of autism is not yet found or clear, it is clear that there is no any connection between bad parenting or having a cold mother and the development of autism.

At first Dr. Leo Kanner, the psychiatrist who first described autism as a unique condition in 1943, believed that it was caused by cold, unloving mothers. Bruno Bettelheim, a renowned professor of child development supported this misinterpretation of autism. Their promotion of the idea that unloving mothers caused their children’s autism created a generation of parents who carried the tremendous burden of guilt for their children’s disability.

In the 1960s and 70s, Dr. Bernard Remand, the father of a son with autism, who later founded the Autism Society of America and the Autism Research Institute, helped the medical community understand that autism is not caused by cold parents but rather is a biological disorder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The diagnosis of Autism

There are no any biological tests that can be done to detect if a child is suffering from autism or not, the diagnosis of autism depends solely on observation and also educational and psychological testing.

An autism-specific screening tool, such as the Modified Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (MCHAT) should be used. The MCHAT is a list of simple questions about the child. The answers determine whether he or she should be referred to a specialist, usually a Developmental Pediatrician, a Neurologist, a Psychiatrist or a Psychologist, for further evaluation.

What do doctors do?

Often, specialists work together as a team to figure out what is wrong. The team might include a pediatrician, a pediatric neurologist, a pediatric develop- mentalist, a child psychiatrist, a child psychologist, speech and language therapists, and others. The team members study how the child plays, learns, communicates, and behaves. The team listens carefully to what parents have noticed, too. Using the information they have gathered doctors can decide whether a child has autism or not.

DSM-IV criteria for a diagnosis of Autism:

A total of six (or more) items from heading (A), (B), and (C), with at least two from (A), and one each from (B) and (C):

(A) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

• Marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to- eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction.
• Failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level.
• A lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people, (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people).
• A lack of social or emotional reciprocity.

(B) Qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:

• Delay in or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime).
• In individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others.
• Stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language.
• Lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level.

(C) Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least two of the following:

• Encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus.
• Apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals.
• Stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. Hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements).
• Persistent preoccupation with parts of objects.

II. Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

(A) Social interaction.
(B) Language is used in social communication.
(C) Symbolic or imaginative play.

III. The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett’s Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.[1]

 

 

 

 

 

[1] (diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders , fourth edition)

 

Treatments used to cure clients diagnosed with Autism

There is no cure for autism but there are treatments that will help reduce the intense of the disorder and help the child and the family cope with the disorder.

Treatment for autism is a very intensive, comprehensive undertaking that involves the child’s entire family and a team of professionals. Some programs may take place in the child’s home with professionals and trained therapists and may include Parent Training for the child under supervision of a professional. Some programs are delivered in a specialized center, classroom or preschool.

There are many therapies and treatments for autism here are some of the most common ones [1] :

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)
Pivotal Response Therapy (PRT)
Verbal therapy
Floor time
Relationship Development Intervention

 

 

 

 

 

[1] (http://www.autismspeaks.org/treatment/floortime.php)

Autism in Oman

As mention in the beginning of the report the main objective from this report is to spread introduce the “Autism Spectrum Disorder” to the Omani people, because after a field research that was made in Oman on children suffering from autism the number 4000,200,1, and 0 was the result of this research.

What does 4000, 200, 1, and 0 stand for?

4000 = number cases of autism in Oman.

200 = number of cases diagnosed in Oman.

1 = number of child psychiatry clinic in Oman.

0 = the future number of undiagnosed cases of autism in Oman.

After reading and understanding the above number it is belived that no more words or discussion is need accept:

“There is a problem you are the solution. There is a dream, you make it real”

Dr. Yahya Al-Farsi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a very scary developmental disorder that deserves special attention, and having as much knowledge about this disorder makes it easier to notice it and diagnosing it earlier and this will help lower the risk of it becoming a sever and un-curable disorder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Mild Autism Children – Symptoms Of Mild Autism

Mild Autism Children

Autism is a type of brain disorder this starts shaping up in the beginning of childhood and runs during the overall lifetime of an individual. Symptoms of mild autism are normally associated provided one more neurobiological disorder renowned as Asperger’s Syndrome.

A child may not normally demonstrate any signs of autism until reaching the age of 3 decades and it is easily past the current age that the parents may create observing symptoms of mild autism. In most cases the children exhibiting symptoms of mild autism substantiate up to hold ordinary IQ market value and sometimes still higher. In order to windfall parents to correctly identify such symptoms in a timely manner, we are outlining some of them as follows:

No. 1: A child suffering with symptoms normally finds it difficult to initiate conversation or making friendships with other children. Even in the cases where the child initiates a discussion, he/she is unable to sustain it for long.

No. 2: The child may get so preoccupied in playing with a certain toy that he/she may completely ignore the presence of other people around him/her. On certain occasions, the child showing symptoms may also continue to stare at a particular toy for a long stretch of time period.

No. 3: Some children who show very odd characteristics of communication like talking too much or talking about totally unrelated things are said to be showing symptoms of mild autism.

No. 4: In some cases, the individual displays immense interest right up to the minute details of non-trivial things or topics. For example, the individual may be able to name and count each and every part that goes into the making of a vacuum cleaner. Mild Autism Children

No. 5: Children ailing from mild autism may find it extremely difficult in maintaining eye-to-eye contact with others for long.

No. 6: If your child shows very strange characteristics like severe mood swings at an early age or lack of consideration for others, he/she may be suffering from mild form of autism

No. 7: Another common characteristic of children exhibiting symptoms is that they very often keep repeating lines from a certain book, movie or previous conversation.

No. 8: The kid may also display serious problems in figuring out another individuals body language and show very poor motor skills. It is normally observed that children with symptoms of mild autism are regularly teased and pulled up by their friends and relatives.

Parents should take care that kids with such type of special condition are dealt with utmost care. If neglected, all such teasing and ignorance can lead to child becoming seriously autistic. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Mild Autism Children program now!

Mild Autism Children is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

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Early Sign Of Autism In Infants – Autism Symptoms in Infants and Toddlers

Early Sign Of Autism In Infants

Autism is a multifaceted brain disorder the present influences a lot of parts in a simple progress, that includes his social, motor and communication skills. The good shock is, there are many slow but sure studies which seek to understand autism. Experts say that early detection and treatment of autism is vital. Early Sign Of Autism In Infants

There is increasing evidence overly it’s possible to detect autism in infants because the first part of intervention can make a big difference in minimizing the symptoms and any a great deal more unpleasent impact of the disorder, it is imperative for parents to comprehend autism’s signs and symptoms.

The symptoms of autism are normally noticeable by 18 to 36 months, and other mild symptoms may be apparent earlier than that; even during infancy. Therefore, parents should closely monitor or track their child’s progress. If the symptoms are identified by 12 months of age or earlier, rigorous treatment may reverse the signs.

Symptoms at the onset are easier to overlook primarily because it entails the lack of normal behaviors; and not the existence of abnormal ones. For instance, most babies with autism normally don’t reach out to get toys, or make signals to get your attention. Most parents misinterpret autism symptoms as signs of being a “good baby,” because the baby is withdrawn and is not demanding. True, a baby with those characteristics are easy to take care of, but these signs are some of the warnings that parents should be vigilant of. Early Sign Of Autism In Infants

What exactly are symptoms that parents should look out for? Here are some warning signs that you should watch for to ensure that your child is developing at a normal rate:

* One of the first signs of autism is if the baby does not look, make eye contact, or turn after hearing their name. * If the baby doesn’t smile in response.

* If the baby doesn’t mimic what you’re doing.

* If the baby doesn’t make attempts to talk (gibberish, babbling)

* If the baby is not visually attracted to things. Here are signs to watch out for toddlers:

* If the child is having difficulty communicating his needs.

* If the child suddenly stops to make attempts to talk.

* If the child has trouble developing his language skills. It’s normal for a parent to become worried once they see their child manifest these symptoms. If you have observed these signs from your infant or toddler, it’s prudent for you to make an appointment with your health provider. Early Sign Of Autism In Infants

Actually, it’s best if you’ll have your child undergo screening even though he seems to develop normally. Don’t let your child suffer anymore! Lead your child out of his world through Early Sign Of Autism In Infants program now!

Early Sign Of Autism In Infants is a proven Autism Solution for your Child.

Try The Program and change child’s life forever!
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